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See detailExtra-solar planet imaging: ground vs space based coronagraphs
Hanot, Charles ULg; Absil, Olivier ULg; Boccaletti, A. et al

Conference (2010, October 28)

In the context of exoplanet detection, a large majority of the 400 detected exoplanets have been found by indirect methods. Today, progress in the field of high contrast and angular resolution imaging has ... [more ▼]

In the context of exoplanet detection, a large majority of the 400 detected exoplanets have been found by indirect methods. Today, progress in the field of high contrast and angular resolution imaging has allowed direct images of several exoplanetary systems to be taken (cf. HR 8799, Fomalhaut and β Pic). In the near future, several new instruments are going to dramatically improve our sensitivity to exoplanet detection. Among these, SPHERE (Spectro Polarimetric High contrast Exoplanet REsearch) at the VLT, MIRI (Mid Infra-Red Instrument) onboard JWST and EPICS at the ELT will be equipped with coronagraphs to reveal faint objects in the vicinity of nearby stars. We made use of the Lyon group (COND) evolutionary models of young (sub-)stellar objects and exoplanets to compare the sensitivities of these different instruments using their estimated coronagraphic profiles. From this comparison, we present a catalogue of targets which are particularly well suited for the different instruments. [less ▲]

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See detailDiversity among other worlds: characterization of exoplanets by direct detection (Update of a White Paper submitted to the ESA ExoPlanet Roadmap Advisory Team)
Schneider, J.; Boccaletti, A.; Aylward, A. et al

Report (2008)

The physical characterization of exoplanets will require to take spectra at several orbital positions. For that purpose, a direct imaging capability is necessary. Direct imaging requires an efficient ... [more ▼]

The physical characterization of exoplanets will require to take spectra at several orbital positions. For that purpose, a direct imaging capability is necessary. Direct imaging requires an efficient stellar suppression mechanism, associated with an ultrasmooth telescope. We show that before future large space missions (interferometer, 4-8 m class coronograph, external occulter or Fresnel imager), direct imaging of giant planets and close-by super-Earth are at the cross-road of a high scientific interest and a reasonable feasibility. The scientific interest lies in the fact that super-Earths share common geophysical attributes with Earths. They already begin to be detected by radial velocity (RV) and, together with giant planets, they have a larger area than Earths, making them detectable with a 1.5-2 m class telescope in reflected light. We propose such a (space) telescope be a first step before large direct imaging missions. [less ▲]

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