References of "Verhoye, Marleen"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOwn song selectivity in the songbird auditory pathway: Suppression by norepinephrine
Poirier, Colline; Boumans, Tiny; Vellema, Michiel et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(5), 20131

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (2 ULg)
See detailOwn song selectivity in the songbird auditory pathway: suppression by norepinephrine
Poirier, Colline; Boumans, Tiny; Vellema, Michiel et al

Poster (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOwn-song recognition in the songbird auditory pathway: selectivity and lateralization.
Poirier, Colline; Boumans, Tiny; Verhoye, Marleen et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2009), 29(7), 2252-8

The songbird brain is able to discriminate between the bird's own song and other conspecific songs. Determining where in the brain own- song selectivity emerges is of great importance because experience ... [more ▼]

The songbird brain is able to discriminate between the bird's own song and other conspecific songs. Determining where in the brain own- song selectivity emerges is of great importance because experience-dependent mechanisms are necessarily involved and because brain regions sensitive to self-generated vocalizations could mediate auditory feedback that is necessary for song learning and maintenance. Using functional MRI, here we show that this selectivity is present at the midbrain level. Surprisingly, the selectivity was found to be lateralized toward the right side, a finding reminiscent of the potential right lateralization of song production in zebra finches but also of own-face and own-voice recognition in human beings. These results indicate that a midbrain structure can process subtle information about the identity of a subject through experience-dependent mechanisms, challenging the classical perception of subcortical regions as primitive and nonplastic structures. They also open questions about the evolution of the cognitive skills and lateralization in vertebrates. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA three-dimensional MRI atlas of the zebra finch brain in stereotaxic coordinates.
Poirier, Colline; Vellema, Michiel; Verhoye, Marleen et al

in NeuroImage (2008), 41(1), 1-6

The neurobiology of birdsong, as a model for human speech, is a fast growing area of research in the neurosciences and involves electrophysiological, histological and more recently magnetic resonance ... [more ▼]

The neurobiology of birdsong, as a model for human speech, is a fast growing area of research in the neurosciences and involves electrophysiological, histological and more recently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches. Many of these studies require the identification and localization of different brain areas (nuclei) involved in the sensory and motor control of song. Until now, the only published atlases of songbird brains consisted in drawings based on histological slices of the canary and of the zebra finch brain. Taking advantage of high-magnetic field (7 Tesla) MRI technique, we present the first high-resolution (80 x 160 x 160 microm) 3-D digital atlas in stereotaxic coordinates of a male zebra finch brain, the most widely used species in the study of birdsong neurobiology. Image quality allowed us to discern most of the song control, auditory and visual nuclei. The atlas can be freely downloaded from our Web site and can be interactively explored with MRIcro. This zebra finch MRI atlas should become a very useful tool for neuroscientists working on birdsong, especially for co-registrating MRI data but also for determining accurately the optimal coordinates and angular approach for injections or electrophysiological recordings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSeasonal rewiring of the songbird brain: an in vivo MRI study.
De Groof, Geert; Verhoye, Marleen; Van Meir, Vincent et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2008), 28(12), 2475-852474

The song control system (SCS) of songbirds displays a remarkable plasticity in species where song output changes seasonally. The mechanisms underlying this plasticity are barely understood and research ... [more ▼]

The song control system (SCS) of songbirds displays a remarkable plasticity in species where song output changes seasonally. The mechanisms underlying this plasticity are barely understood and research has primarily been focused on the song nuclei themselves, largely neglecting their interconnections and connections with other brain regions. We investigated seasonal changes in the entire brain, including the song nuclei and their connections, of nine male starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). At two times of the year, during the breeding (April) and nonbreeding (July) seasons, we measured in the same subjects cellular attributes of brain regions using in vivo high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 7 T. An increased fractional anisotropy in the HVC-RA pathway that correlates with an increase in axonal density (and myelination) was found during the breeding season, confirming multiple previous histological reports. Other parts of the SCS, namely the occipitomesencephalic axonal pathway, which contains fiber tracts important for song production, showed increased fractional anisotropy due to myelination during the breeding season and the connection between HVC and Area X showed an increase in axonal connectivity. Beyond the SCS we discerned fractional anisotropy changes that correlate with myelination changes in the optic chiasm and axonal organization changes in an interhemispheric connection, the posterior commissure. These results demonstrate an unexpectedly broad plasticity in the connectivity of the avian brain that might be involved in preparing subjects for the competitive and demanding behavioral tasks that are associated with successful reproduction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (1 ULg)