References of "Verhelst, J"
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See detailCabergoline in the treatment of Hyoerprolactinemia : A study in 455 patients
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Maiter, D. et al

in 9th Meeting and workshop of the European Neuroendocrine Association - Abstract book (1999)

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See detailTwo years of replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency.
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Vandeweghe, M. et al

in Clinical Endocrinology (1997), 47(4), 485-494

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large groups of patients treated for more than one year. In addition, the optimal dose of rhGH for each patient and the baseline parameters that predict which patients will benefit most from therapy or will have adverse events are not entirely elucidated. DESIGN: 148 adult GHD patients were enrolled in a multicentre 2-year rhGH replacement study which was placebo controlled for the first six months. rhGH (Genotropin/Genotonorm Pharmacia & Upjohn) was given in a dose of 0.25 IU/kg/week sc (1.5 IU/m2/day). MEASUREMENTS: Every 3-6 months body composition was measured using body impedance analysis and general well being was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and social self-reporting questionnaire. At the same time patients had a full clinical examination and blood was sampled for glucose, HbA1c, IGF-1, creatinine, full blood count, thyroid hormones and liver function tests. RESULTS: With rhGH therapy IGF-1 levels increased from -2.00 +/- 2.60 SDS to 1.47 +/- 2.6 SDS after six months (P < 0.001), continued to rise despite no change in dose to 1.84 +/- 2.8 SDS after one year and remained constant thereafter (1.98 +/- 2.4 after 2 years). 56% of patients ultimately attained supranormal IGF-1 levels (+2 SD), 22% had levels below the mean, of which 9% were below -2 SD. Within 3 months lean body mass (LBM) increased by +5.09% (P < 0.001), total body water (TBW) by +5.40% (P < 0.001), while body fat (BF) dropped by -10.89% (P < 0.001) and waist circumference by -1.42% (P < 0.004). These effects were maintained during the first year of therapy, but the effect was attenuated after 24 months: LBM, +3.91% (P < 0.001); TBW, +3.28%, P < 0.001, BF, -6.42% (P < 0.001) and waist -2.22% (P < 0.009). Individual differences in response were large and could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters, except for a better response in males. Treatment resulted in a large and progressive improvement on the NHP scale, especially energy, emotions and sleep, but a similar change was also found in patients during placebo treatment. With rhGH the number of full days of sick leave/6 months decreased from 12.17 +/- 3.90 days (SEM) to 7.15 +/- 3.50 days after six months (P = 0.009), 2.93 +/- 1.55 days after 12 months (P = 0.01), 0.39 +/- 0.17 days after 18 months (P < 0.001) and 3.3 +/- 2.51 days after 24 months (P = 0.026). Similarly, the hospitalization rate went down from 14.9 to 7% after 6 months and remained at this level thereafter (P = 0.12). About one third of patients on rhGH experienced fluid-related adverse events, most often within the first 3 months. They usually disappeared spontaneously or responded well to dose reduction. Cumulative dropout rates were 29% after 1 year and 38% after two years. Two thirds of these patients stopped treatment because of insufficient subjective improvement. Neither drop-outs nor fluid retention could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed in a large group of patients the beneficial effects of rhGH therapy on body composition, metabolic parameters and general well-being and found a consistent drop in number of sick days and hospitalization rate. These effects were maintained during two years of therapy, except for an attenuation in body composition changes after 24 months. The high incidence of fluid-related adverse events suggests that it may be better to start with lower doses of rhGH and to increase the dose more slowly over a number of weeks. The finding of suboptimal high or low IGF-1 levels in many patients reinforces guidelines not to give rhGH in a weight-dependent dose but to titrate it individually for each patient. [less ▲]

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See detail125I-Tyr0-hCRH labelling characteristics of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors: differences between normal and adenomatous corticotrophs.
Abs, R.; Smets, G.; Vauquelin, G. et al

in Neurochemistry International (1997), 30(3), 291-297

The presence of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors has been previously demonstrated in corticotrophs from normal pituitaries using a method combining immunocytochemistry and liquid emulsion ... [more ▼]

The presence of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors has been previously demonstrated in corticotrophs from normal pituitaries using a method combining immunocytochemistry and liquid emulsion autoradiography. The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of the 125I-Tyr0-hCRH binding in corticotrophs from normal pituitaries (three obtained at autopsy and one obtained at surgery) with corticotrophs from pituitary adenomas (six corticotroph adenomas responsible for Cushing's disease and two silent corticotroph adenomas secreting a biologically inactive ACTH molecule). In normal corticotrophs, the larger part of the 125I-Tyr0-hCRH binding was localised in patchy conglomerates at the centre of the cell and, to a much lesser degree, in a diffuse pattern at the cell periphery. In adenomatous corticotrophs, CRH receptor expression is disturbed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Except for a minority of cells in one adenoma, all adenomatous corticotrophs showed only peripherally bound 125I-Tyr0-hCRH and no centrally localised binding. Furthermore, adenomatous corticotrophs revealed a statistically significant lower signal intensity when compared to normal corticotrophs and a strongly negative correlation was found between the labelling area in adenomatous corticotrophs and both the basal and CRH-stimulated plasma ACTH levels. These findings suggest defective processing of CRH receptors and could be relevant to the sustained ACTH secretion by adenomatous corticotrophs in Cushing's disease and, more generally, provide an explanation to its pathology. The silent corticotrophs secreting a biologically inactive ACTH molecule were characterised by a very faint signal intensity, although present on almost every cell. [less ▲]

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See detailCabergoline, a new long-acting dopamine agonist, in the treatment of acromegaly
Abs, R.; Verhelst, J.; Verbessem, G. et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailTwo years or replacement therapy in 148 adults with growth hormone déficiency in Belgium
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Mockel, J. et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailThe treatment of prolactinomas with cabergoline
Beckers, Albert ULg; Louis, O.; Verhelst, J. et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailEffect of naloxone and metoclopropamide on LH secretion in a hyperprolactinemic, hypogonadotropic, postmenopausal woman, fertility and sterility.
Verhelst, J.; Beckers, Albert ULg; Abs, R.

in Fertility and Sterility (1995), 64(5), 969-971

OBJECTIVE: To determine the role of opioidergic and dopaminergic activity in the suppression of GnRH0LH in a hyperprolactinemic state. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENT: A 68-year ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To determine the role of opioidergic and dopaminergic activity in the suppression of GnRH0LH in a hyperprolactinemic state. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENT: A 68-year-old woman with a macroprolactinoma. INTERVENTIONS: Serial 10-hour IV infusions of naloxone and metoclopramide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Serum LH concentration. RESULTS: Naloxone induced a small but significant rise of serum LH levels, which displayed a pulsatile pattern. By contrast, metoclopramide elicited no significant response in LH secretion. CONCLUSION: Opioidergic but not dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a direct role in the suppression of LH secondary to hyperprolactinemia. [less ▲]

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See detailThe treatment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in adults : the 148 belgian patients
Beckers, Albert ULg; Moreau, L.; Mockel, J. et al

in The Endocrine Society : Annual meeting, Washington DC, June 1995 (1995)

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See detailHyperfunctioning unilateral adrenal macronodule in three patients with Cushing's disease: hormonal and imaging characterization.
Abs, R.; Nobels, F.; Verhelst, J. et al

in Acta Endocrinologica (1993), 129(4), 284-90

We aimed to investigate the dynamics of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol secretion in pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome with bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia presenting as a single ... [more ▼]

We aimed to investigate the dynamics of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol secretion in pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome with bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia presenting as a single adrenal macronodule, and to determine the imaging characteristics of this syndrome. Three female patients were studied. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion were studied by determining their rhythmicity and pulsatility and their responses to the administration of ovine corticotropin-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, metyrapone, tetracosactrin, insulin and dexamethasone. Techniques used to localize the anatomical lesion were bilateral simultaneous inferior petrosal sinus sampling, magnetic resonance examination of the pituitary, computed tomography (CT) scanning and [75Se]cholesterol scintigraphy of the adrenal glands. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol levels were measured using a commercial radioimmunoassay and an immunoradiometric assay. The ACTH and cortisol pulse number and amplitude were calculated using established computer software. In all three patients ACTH and cortisol secretory dynamics fulfilled the requirements for diagnosis of pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome. A close relationship between ACTH and cortisol pulses also favored a pituitary dependency. Study of the amplitude of cortisol pulses classified two patients in the group of hypopulsatile Cushing's disease. Adrenal CT scanning demonstrated the presence of a large single nodule. [75Se]Cholesterol scintigraphy showed bilateral radionuclide uptake, although mostly localized over the adrenal nodule. All patients underwent successful trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy. Over a period of 1 year, a slow shrinkage of the adrenal nodule was observed in two patients, while no change in volume was observed in one patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailDecreased number and defect of the initialization process of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors in adenomatous corticotrophs
Smets, G.; Abs, R.; Verhelst, J. et al

in The 75th Annual meeting of the Endocrine society - Abstract book (1993)

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See detailDecreased number and defect of the internalization process of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors in adenomatous corticotrophs
verhelst, j; Abs, R.; Beckers, Albert ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1993), 48

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See detailThe treatment of prolactinomas with cabegoline : results in 56 patients
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Verhaert, G. et al

in Neuro-endocrinologie PRL, VI International prolactin congress - Abstract book (1993)

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See detailLe traitement des prolactinomes par un nouvel agoniste dopaminergique (le CV 205-502) : résultats chez 48 patients.
Beckers, Albert ULg; Ghuysen, A. E.; Abs, R. et al

in Médecine et Hygiène (1992), 50

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See detailEvaluatie van de nieuwe dopamine-agonist CV 205-502 in de behandeling van prolactinomen
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Beckers, Albert ULg et al

in Acta Antwerpiensia (1992), 9

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See detailClinical experience with CV 205-502 (Sandoz) in the treatment of prolactinomas
mahler, c; verhelst, j; abs, r et al

in ninth Internation Congress of Endocrinology-Abstract book (1992)

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See detailHyperfunctioning unilateral adrenal macro-nodule in two patients with cushing's disease : hormonal and imaging characteristics.
Abs, R.; Verhelst, J.; Nobels, F. et al

Conference (1992)

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See detailCV 205-502 : Een niewe lang-werkende dopamine-agonist voor de behandeling van hyperprolactinemie.
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Beckers, Albert ULg et al

in Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde (1991)

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