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See detailMutations in FKBP10 cause recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and bruck syndrome.
Kelley, B. P.; Malfait, F.; Bonafe, L. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011)

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and post-translational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal ... [more ▼]

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and post-translational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal dominant OI is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Bruck syndrome is a recessive disorder featuring congenital contractures in addition to bone fragility; Bruck syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in PLOD2 encoding collagen lysyl hydroxylase, while Bruck Syndrome type 1 has been mapped to 17q12 but the gene has remained elusive so far. Recently, the molecular spectrum of OI has been expanded with the description of the basis of a unique post-translational modification of type I procollagen, i.e. 3-prolyl-hydroxylation. Three proteins, cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl-3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1, encoded by the LEPRE1 gene), and the prolyl cis-trans isomerase cyclophilin-B (PPIB) form a complex that is required for fibrillar collagen 3-prolyl-hydroxylation and mutations in each gene have been shown to cause recessive forms of OI. Since then, an additional putative collagen chaperone complex, composed of FKBP10 (also known as FKBP65) and SERPINH1 (also known as HSP47), has also been shown to be mutated in recessive OI. Here, we describe five families with OI-like bone fragility in association with congenital contractures who all had FKBP10 mutations. Given the previous mapping of Bruck syndrome type 1 to the chromosomal region containing FKBP10, we conclude that FKBP10 mutations are the cause of Bruck syndrome type 1. (c) 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. [less ▲]

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See detailChorea associated with anti-phospholipid antibodies: case report.
DEMONTY, Jean ULg; GONCE, Michel ULg; Ribai, P. et al

in Acta clinica Belgica (2010), 65(5), 350-3

A seventeen year-old boy developed left sided chorea in a few days, subsequently involving the four limbs. Although he presented a marfanoid phenotype, genetic analysis of the Fibrillin 1 was normal. The ... [more ▼]

A seventeen year-old boy developed left sided chorea in a few days, subsequently involving the four limbs. Although he presented a marfanoid phenotype, genetic analysis of the Fibrillin 1 was normal. The genes for familial chorea and Huntington's disease were also negative. Biological tests showed normal serum homocystein, but revealed very high levels of anti-beta2-GP1 IgG, anticardiolipin and lupus anticoagulant, which remained at similar values for a period of over three months. Electroencephalogram and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormalities. Brain PET-scan disclosed bilateral striatal hypermetabolism. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone and low dose of acetylsalicylic acid. He improved markedly after six weeks of treatment, and choreic movements disappeared completely after two months. A control PET-scan performed at this time showed reversion of striated hypermetabolism to a normal pattern. The pathogenic aspects of this relatively rare case of chorea are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailIRF6 Screening of Syndromic and a priori Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: Identification of a New Type of Minor VWS Sign.
Desmyter, L.; Ghassibe, M.; Revencu, N. et al

in Molecular Syndromology (2010), 1(2), 67-74

Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), caused by dominant IRF6 mutation, is the most common cleft syndrome. In 15% of the patients, lip pits are absent and the phenotype mimics isolated clefts. Therefore, we ... [more ▼]

Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), caused by dominant IRF6 mutation, is the most common cleft syndrome. In 15% of the patients, lip pits are absent and the phenotype mimics isolated clefts. Therefore, we hypothesized that some of the families classified as having non-syndromic inherited cleft lip and palate could have an IRF6 mutation. We screened in total 170 patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P): 75 were syndromic and 95 were a priori part of multiplex non-syndromic families. A mutation was identified in 62.7 and 3.3% of the patients, respectively. In one of the 95 a priori non-syndromic families with an autosomal dominant inheritance (family B), new insights into the family history revealed the presence, at birth, of lower lip pits in two members and the diagnosis was revised as VWS. A novel lower lip sign was observed in one individual in this family. Interestingly, a similar lower lip sign was also observed in one individual from a 2nd family (family A). This consists of 2 nodules below the lower lip on the external side. In a 3rd multiplex family (family C), a de novo mutation was identified in an a priori non-syndromic CL/P patient. Re-examination after mutation screening revealed the presence of a tiny pit-looking lesion on the inner side of the lower lip leading to a revised diagnosis of VWS. On the basis of this data, we conclude that IRF6 should be screened when any doubt rises about the normality of the lower lip and also if a non-syndromic cleft lip patient (with or without cleft palate) has a family history suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. [less ▲]

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See detailAbnormalities of the long arm of chromosome 21 in 107 patients with hematopoietic disorders: a collaborative retrospective study of the Groupe Francais de Cytogenetique Hematologique
Jeandidier, E.; Dastugue, N.; Mugneret, F. et al

in Cancer Genetics & Cytogenetics (2006), 166(1), 1-11

Chromosome 21 is frequently rearranged in hematopoietic malignancies. In order to detect new chromosomal aberrations, the Groupe Francais de Cytogenetique Hematologique collected a series of 107 patients ... [more ▼]

Chromosome 21 is frequently rearranged in hematopoietic malignancies. In order to detect new chromosomal aberrations, the Groupe Francais de Cytogenetique Hematologique collected a series of 107 patients with various hematologic disorders and acquired structural abnormalities of the long arm of chromosome 21. The abnormalities were subclassified into 10 groups, according to the location of the 21q breakpoint and the type of abnormality. Band 21q22 was implicated in 72 patients (excluding duplications, triplications, and amplifications). The involvement of the RUNX1 gene was confirmed in 10 novel translocations, but the gene partners were not identified. Eleven novel translocations rearranging band 21q22 with hands 1q25, 2p21, 2q37, 3p21, 3p23, 4q31, 6p24-p25, 6p12, 7p15, 16p11, and 18q21 were detected. Rearrangements of band 21q11 and 21q21 were detected in six novel translocations with 5p15, 6p21, 15q21, 16p13, and 20q11 and with 1p33, 3q27, 5p14, 11q11, and 14q11, respectively. Duplications, triplications, amplifications, and isodicentric chromosomes were detected in eight, three, eight, and three patients, respectively. The present study shows both the wide distribution of the breakpoints on the long arm of chromosome 21 in hematopoietic malignancy and the diversity of the chromosomal rearrangements and the hematologic disorders involved. The findings invite further investigation of the 21q abnormalities to detect their associated molecular rearrangements. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for a relationship between Ehlers-Danlos type VII C in humans and bovine dermatosparaxis.
Nusgens, Betty ULg; Verellen-Dumoulin, C.; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh ULg et al

in Nature Genetics (1992), 1(3), 214-7

Ehlers-Danlos (ED) syndrome type VII is characterized by the accumulation of collagen precursors in connective tissues. ED VII A and B are caused by mutations in the genes of alpha 1 and alpha 2 collagen ... [more ▼]

Ehlers-Danlos (ED) syndrome type VII is characterized by the accumulation of collagen precursors in connective tissues. ED VII A and B are caused by mutations in the genes of alpha 1 and alpha 2 collagen I which result in the disruption of the cleavage site of procollagen I N-proteinase. The existence of ED VII C in humans has been hypothesized on the basis of a disorder in cattle and sheep related to the absence of the enzyme. We now present evidence for the existence of this disease in humans, characterized by skin fragility, altered polymers seen as hieroglyphic pictures with electron microscopy, accumulation of p-N-alpha 1 and p-N-alpha 2 collagen type I in the dermis and absence of processing of the p-N-I polypeptides in fibroblast cultures. [less ▲]

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