References of "Vanootighem, Valentine"
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See detailVerbal overshadowing of face memory does occur in children too!
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Frontiers in Psychology (2013)

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See detailThe influence of verbal descriptions and delay on face identification in children and adults.
Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2012, May 10)

Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect (VO)” (Schooler & Englster-Schooler ... [more ▼]

Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect (VO)” (Schooler & Englster-Schooler, 1990). In spite of a large body of literature on the suggestibility of children testimony, only one study has examined whether descriptions also impaired children’s identification abilities in a single group of children (8-9 years old) and no evidence of VO was found (Memon & Rose, 2002). However, the method might not have been appropriate to observe this effect as the description and the control tasks were not completed immediately but after a 24h delay that has sometimes been associated to a release of the VO effect (e.g. Schooler & Englster-Schooler, 1990; Finger & Pezdek, 1999). The aim of this experiment was to examine the influence of verbal descriptions and delay on face identification in several groups of children (7-8, 10-11, 13-14 years old) and adults when assigned either to “No delay”, “Post description delay” or “Post encoding delay” condition. The quality and influence of descriptors across the ages were also examined. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes delay release the verbal overshadowing effect in child and adult eyewitnesses?
Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in Perception (2012), 41(supplement), 194

The verbal overshadowing effect (VO) (eg, Schooler and Engstler-Schooler, 1990 Cognitive Psychology 22(1) 36–71) suggests that the fact of generating a verbal description of a previously seen face may ... [more ▼]

The verbal overshadowing effect (VO) (eg, Schooler and Engstler-Schooler, 1990 Cognitive Psychology 22(1) 36–71) suggests that the fact of generating a verbal description of a previously seen face may impair subsequent performance on a lineup identification task in adults. Previous research has examined whether descriptions also impaired children’s identification abilities but no evidence of VO was found (Memon and Rose, 2002 Psychology, Crime and Law 8(3), 229–242). However, the method might not have been appropriate to observe this effect as, for instance, a 24-hour delay between the description and the identification tasks (associated with a release of the VO effect in adults) was used. Hence, in this current experiment, groups of children (7–8, 10–11, 13–14 years old) and adults were presented with a short video and then assigned to a description or a no description condition before the identification task. Participants were also assigned either to a “no delay”, a “24-hour post encoding delay” or a “24-hour post description delay” condition to determine the influence of delay on the VO effect. Results indicated that, compared to the control condition, the description decreased correct identification performance in both children and adults and no release of VO was found with delay. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence of a verbal overshadowing effect in children
Vanootighem, Valentine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2011, August 01)

The report of verbal descriptions of a culprit by adult witnesses may impair their later identification ability, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect (VO)” (Schooler & Englster-Schooler ... [more ▼]

The report of verbal descriptions of a culprit by adult witnesses may impair their later identification ability, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect (VO)” (Schooler & Englster-Schooler, 1990). In spite of a large body of literature on the suggestibility of children testimony, only one study has examined whether descriptions also impaired children’s identification abilities in a single group of children (8-9 years old) and no evidence of VO was found (Memon & Rose, 2002). However, some procedural details were not controlled in this experiment and the absence of a control adult group did not allow determining whether the procedure used was able to induce a VO effect. Hence, 2 experiments were conducted on several groups of children (7-8, 10-11, 13-14 years old) and adults to determine the influence of development on the VO effect. Overall, a VO effect on face identification was found in both experiments. The quality and influence of descriptors across the ages were also examined. [less ▲]

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See detailCortisol awakening response (CAR)’s flexibility leads to larger and more consistent associations with psychological factors than CAR magnitude
Mikolajczak, M.; Quoidbach, Jordi ULg; Vanootighem, Valentine ULg et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2010)

The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is increasingly recognized as a potential biological marker of psychological and physical health status. Yet, the CAR literature is replete with contradictory results ... [more ▼]

The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is increasingly recognized as a potential biological marker of psychological and physical health status. Yet, the CAR literature is replete with contradictory results: both supposedly protective and vulnerability psychosocial factors have been associated with both increased and decreased CAR. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the CAR flexibility would be a better indicator of psychological status than CAR magnitude. Forty-two men measures of happiness, perceived stress and neuroticism, and took saliva samples immediately on awakening, then at 15, 30, 45 and 60 min post-awakening on three study days (i.e., Sunday, Monday and Tuesday). When considering the CAR magnitude, our effects perfectly reflect the inconsistencies previously observed in the literature (i.e., the main effects of the psychological predictors are not consistent with each other, and the effect of one predictor on a given day contradicts the effect of the same predictor on another day). However, considering the CAR flexibility leads to a fully consistent pattern: protective factors (i.e., high happiness, low stress, low neurotiscim) are associated with a flexible CAR (i.e., lower CAR during weekends compared to workdays) whereas vulnerability factors (i.e., low happiness, high stress, high neurotiscim) are associated with a stiff CAR (i.e., same magnitude during weekends and workdays). We conclude that considering the CAR flexibility (e.g., between weekends and workdays) rather than the traditional CAR magnitude might be a way to understand the apparent conflicts in the CAR literature. [less ▲]

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