References of "Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose et douleurs chroniques
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg; STAQUET, Cécile ULg; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg

in Roelans, F.; Watremez, C.; Ogez, D. (Eds.) L’hypnose médicale : un outil pour améliorer l’accompagnement du patient atteint d’un cancer ? (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (5 ULg)
See detailDisorders of consciousness: new advances in neuroimaging techniques
Soddu, Andrea ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg et al

in Zanotti, Bruno (Ed.) Vegetative State (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose: on it’s very existence
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg

Conference (2016, April 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRepeated Behavioral Assessments in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
Wannez, Sarah ULg; Annen, Jitka ULg; Aubinet, Charlène ULg et al

Conference (2016, March 04)

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might ... [more ▼]

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might suffer from consciousness fluctuations, but it is not specified how many assessments are needed. The present study included 131 patients with DOC. They have been assessed at least 6 times during a 14-days period with the CRS-R. Results show that 5 CRS-R assessments are needed to reach a reliable diagnosis, and that all the CRS-R subscales are influenced by consciousness fluctuations. We here showed that consciousness fluctuations influence the behavioral diagnosis, and that 5 assessments within a short period of time are needed to get a reliable clinical diagnosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCorrelation between resting state fMRI total neuronal activity and PET metabolism in healthy controls and patients with disorders of consciousness
Soddu, Andrea ULg; Gomez, Francisco; Heine, Lizette ULg et al

in Brain and Behavior (2016)

Introduction: The mildly invasive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging technique to measure ‘resting state’ cerebral metabolism. This technique made ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The mildly invasive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging technique to measure ‘resting state’ cerebral metabolism. This technique made it possible to assess changes in metabolic activity in clinical applications, such as the study of severe brain injury and disorders of consciousness. Objective: We assessed the possi- bility of creating functional MRI activity maps, which could estimate the rela- tive levels of activity in FDG-PET cerebral metabolic maps. If no metabolic absolute measures can be extracted, our approach may still be of clinical use in centers without access to FDG-PET. It also overcomes the problem of recogniz- ing individual networks of independent component selection in functional mag- netic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting state analysis. Methods: We extracted resting state fMRI functional connectivity maps using independent component analysis and combined only components of neuronal origin. To assess neu- ronality of components a classification based on support vector machine (SVM) was used. We compared the generated maps with the FDG-PET maps in 16 healthy controls, 11 vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients and four locked-in patients. Results: The results show a significant similarity with q = 0.75  0.05 for healthy controls and q = 0.58  0.09 for vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients between the FDG- PET and the fMRI based maps. FDG-PET, fMRI neuronal maps, and the conjunction analysis show decreases in frontoparietal and medial regions in vegetative patients with respect to controls. Subsequent analysis in locked-in syndrome patients produced also consistent maps with healthy controls. Conclusions: The constructed resting state fMRI functional connectivity map points toward the possibility for fMRI resting state to estimate relative levels of activity in a metabolic map. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (11 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation clinique des états de conscience altérée
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg

Conference (2015, November 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCerebral functional connectivity periodically (de)synchronizes with anatomical constraints
Liegeois, Raphaël ULg; Ziegler, Erik; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Brain Structure and Function (2015)

This paper studies the link between resting-state functional connectivity (FC), measured by the correlations of the fMRI BOLD time courses, and structural connectivity (SC), estimated through fiber ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the link between resting-state functional connectivity (FC), measured by the correlations of the fMRI BOLD time courses, and structural connectivity (SC), estimated through fiber tractography. Instead of a static analysis based on the correlation between SC and the FC averaged over the entire fMRI time series, we propose a dynamic analysis, based on the time evolution of the correlation between SC and a suitably windowed FC. Assessing the statistical significance of the time series against random phase permutations, our data show a pronounced peak of significance for time window widths around 20-30 TR (40-60 sec). Using the appropriate window width, we show that FC patterns oscillate between phases of high modularity, primarily shaped by anatomy, and phases of low modularity, primarily shaped by inter-network connectivity. Building upon recent results in dynamic FC, this emphasizes the potential role of SC as a transitory architecture between different highly connected resting state FC patterns. Finally, we show that networks implied in consciousness-related processes, such as the default mode network (DMN), contribute more to these brain-level fluctuations compared to other networks, such as the motor or somatosensory networks. This suggests that the fluctuations between FC and SC are capturing mind-wandering effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (16 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose et recherche
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg

Conference (2015, May 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe use of hypnosis in healthcare
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg

in Revue du Praticien (La) (2015), 65(4), 457-459

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThalamic volume as a biomarker for Disorders Of Consciousness. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging
Rubeaux, M; Mahalingam, J; Gomez, F et al

in Proceedings of SPIE (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnosis and pain modulation.
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg; Gillet, Aline ULg; NYSSEN, Anne-Sophie ULg et al

in Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Jackson, PL (Eds.) Pain in the Conscious Brain (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEfficacy and cost-effectiveness: A study of different treatment approaches in a tertiary pain centre
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg; Gillet, Aline ULg; MALAISE, Nicole ULg et al

in European Journal of Pain (London, England) (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSwallowing in disorders of consciousness
Bicego, Aminata; Lejoly, Kelly ULg; Maudoux, Audrey et al

in Revue Neurologique (2014), 170(10),

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurophysiology of hypnosis
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg

in Clinical Neurophysiology (2014), 44

We here review behavioral, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies of hypnosis as a state, as well as hypnosis as a tool to modulate brain responses to painful stimulations. Studies have shown that ... [more ▼]

We here review behavioral, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies of hypnosis as a state, as well as hypnosis as a tool to modulate brain responses to painful stimulations. Studies have shown that hypnotic processes modify internal (self awareness) as well as external (environmental awareness) brain networks. Brain mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain perception under hypnotic conditions involve cortical as well as subcortical areas including anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, basal ganglia and thalami. Combined with local anesthesia and conscious sedation in patients undergoing surgery, hypnosis is associated with improved peri- and postoperative comfort of patients and surgeons. Finally, hypnosis can be considered as a useful analogue for simulating conversion and dissociation symptoms in healthy subjects, permitting better characterization of these challenging disorders by producing clinically similar experiences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (8 ULg)