References of "Vanhaeverbeek, Michel"
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See detailMyeloperoxidase-Dependent LDL Modifications in Bloodstream Are Mainly Predicted by Angiotensin II, Adiponectin, and Myeloperoxidase Activity: A Cross-Sectional Study in Men
Zouaoui Boudjeltia, Karim; Delporte, Cédric; Van Antwerpen, Pierre et al

in Mediators of Inflammation (2013), 2013

The present paradigm of atherogenesis proposes that low density lipoproteins (LDLs) are trapped in subendothelial space of the vascular wall where they are oxidized. Previously, we showed that oxidation ... [more ▼]

The present paradigm of atherogenesis proposes that low density lipoproteins (LDLs) are trapped in subendothelial space of the vascular wall where they are oxidized. Previously, we showed that oxidation is not restricted to the subendothelial location. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme secreted by neutrophils and macrophages, can modify LDL (Mox-LDL) at the surface of endothelial cells. In addition we observed that the activation of the endothelial cells by angiotensin II amplifies this process. We suggested that induction of the NADPH oxidase complex was a major step in the oxidative process. Based on these data, we asked whether there was an independent association, in 121 patients, between NADPH oxidase modulators, such as angiotensin II, adiponectin, and levels of circulating Mox-LDL. Our observations suggest that the combination of blood angiotensin II, MPO activity, and adiponectin explains, at least partially, serum Mox-LDL levels. [less ▲]

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See detailSimultaneous measurement of protein-bound 3-chlorotyrosine and homocitrulline by LC-MS/MS after hydrolysis assisted by microwave: application to the study of myeloperoxidase activity during hemodialysis.
Delporte, Cedric; Franck, Thierry ULg; Noyon, Caroline et al

in Talanta (2012), 99

A high degree of uremia is common in patients with end-stage renal disease and has been linked to the development of chronic inflammation and cardiovascular diseases. In conditions where transplantation ... [more ▼]

A high degree of uremia is common in patients with end-stage renal disease and has been linked to the development of chronic inflammation and cardiovascular diseases. In conditions where transplantation is not possible, uremia can be reduced by hemodialysis although the repeated interventions have been implicated in loss of renal function, partially as a result of chronic inflammation and/or oxidative stress processes. In this context, it has been suggested that myeloperoxidase (MPO) can contribute to the oxidative stress during hemodialysis and to the cardiovascular risk. Protein damages due to MPO activity have never been assessed during hemodialysis although two of its reaction products, 3-chlorotyrosine and homocitrulline, are of interest. Indeed, the first one is a specific product of MPO activity and the formation of the second one could be catalyzed by MPO. In order to analyze these products in plasma proteins, a total hydrolysis method followed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis was developed. Different conditions of hydrolysis were tested and the optimized procedure was assessed for complete hydrolysis and artifactual chlorination. Finally, the method was used for analyzing 3-chlorotyrosine and homocitrulline in plasma proteins during a hemodialysis session in fifteen patients and data were related to measurements of MPO concentration and activity. Both increases in MPO activity and protein-bound 3-chlorotyrosine were observed, highlighting the involvement of MPO in oxidative stress during hemodialysis and further demonstrating the link between hemodialysis and cardiovascular diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailBenefits of napping and an extended duration of recovery sleep on alertness and immune cells after acute sleep restriction.
Faraut, Brice; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Dyzma, Michal et al

in Brain, Behavior & Immunity (2011), 25(1), 16-24

Understanding the interactions between sleep and the immune system may offer insight into why short sleep duration has been linked to negative health outcomes. We, therefore, investigated the effects of ... [more ▼]

Understanding the interactions between sleep and the immune system may offer insight into why short sleep duration has been linked to negative health outcomes. We, therefore, investigated the effects of napping and extended recovery sleep after sleep restriction on the immune and inflammatory systems and sleepiness. After a baseline night, healthy young men slept for a 2-h night followed by either a standard 8-h recovery night (n=12), a 30-min nap (at 1 p.m.) in addition to an 8-h recovery night (n=10), or a 10-h extended recovery night (n=9). A control group slept 3 consecutive 8-h nights (n=9). Subjects underwent continuous electroencephalogram polysomnography and blood was sampled every day at 7 a.m. Leukocytes, inflammatory and atherogenesis biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-8, myeloperoxidase, fibrinogen and apolipoproteins ApoB/ApoA), sleep patterns and sleepiness were investigated. All parameters remained unchanged in the control group. After sleep restriction, leukocyte and - among leukocyte subsets - neutrophil counts were increased, an effect that persisted after the 8-h recovery sleep, but, in subjects who had a nap or a 10-h recovery sleep, these values returned nearly to baseline. Inflammatory and atherogenesis biomarkers were unchanged except for higher myeloperoxidase levels after sleep restriction. The increased sleepiness after sleep restriction was reversed better in the nap and extended sleep recovery conditions. Saliva cortisol decreased immediately after the nap. Our results indicate that additional recovery sleep after sleep restriction provided by a midday nap prior to recovery sleep or a sleep extended night can improve alertness and return leukocyte counts to baseline values. [less ▲]

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See detailIr-LBP, an ixodes ricinus tick salivary LTB4-binding lipocalin, interferes with host neutrophil function.
Beaufays, Jérôme ULg; Adam, Benoit; Menten-Dedoyart, Catherine ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2008), 3(12), 3987

BACKGROUND: During their blood meal, ticks secrete a wide variety of proteins that can interfere with their host's defense mechanisms. Among these proteins, lipocalins play a major role in the modulation ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: During their blood meal, ticks secrete a wide variety of proteins that can interfere with their host's defense mechanisms. Among these proteins, lipocalins play a major role in the modulation of the inflammatory response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We previously identified 14 new lipocalin genes in the tick Ixodes ricinus. One of them codes for a protein that specifically binds leukotriene B4 with a very high affinity (Kd: +/-1 nM), similar to that of the neutrophil transmembrane receptor BLT1. By in silico approaches, we modeled the 3D structure of the protein and the binding of LTB4 into the ligand pocket. This protein, called Ir-LBP, inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro and delays LTB4-induced apoptosis. Ir-LBP also inhibits the host inflammatory response in vivo by decreasing the number and activation of neutrophils located at the tick bite site. Thus, Ir-LBP participates in the tick's ability to interfere with proper neutrophil function in inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These elements suggest that Ir-LBP is a "scavenger" of LTB4, which, in combination with other factors, such as histamine-binding proteins or proteins inhibiting the classical or alternative complement pathways, permits the tick to properly manage its blood meal. Moreover, with regard to its properties, Ir-LBP could possibly be used as a therapeutic tool for illnesses associated with an increased LTB4 production. [less ▲]

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