References of "Vanhaelst, L"
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See detailTotal joint replacement of hip or knee as an outcome measure for structure modifying trials in osteoarthritis
Altman, R. D.; Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 10

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of agents used in the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: updated recommendations from GREES
Abadie, Eric ULg; Devogealer, Jean-Pierre; Ringe, J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 47

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See detailTotal joint replacement of hip or knee as an outcome measure for structure modifying trials in osteoarthritis
Altman, R. D.; Abadie, Eric ULg; Avouac, B. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2005), 13(1), 13-19

Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working group to assess the value of time to joint surgery as a potential therapeutic failure outcome criterion ... [more ▼]

Objective: The Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES) organized a working group to assess the value of time to joint surgery as a potential therapeutic failure outcome criterion for osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee in the assessment of potential structure modifying agents. Methods: PubMed was searched for manuscripts from 1976 to 2004. Relevant studies were discussed at a 1-day meeting. Results: There are no accepted guidelines for 'time to' and 'indications for' joint replacement surgery. A limited number of trials have examined joint replacement surgery within the study population. Several parameters, particularly joint space narrowing (interbone distance), correlate with surgical intervention. However, at the level of the knee, none of the parameters have positive predictive value for joint replacement surgery better than 30%. In contrast, lack of significant joint space narrowing has a strong negative predictive value for joint replacement surgery (> 90%), that remains after controlling for OA pain severity. Conclusion: At this time, GREES cannot recommend time to joint surgery as a primary endpoint of failure for structure modifying trials of hip or knee OA-as the parameter has sensitivity but lacks specificity. In contrast, in existing trials, a lack of progression of joint space narrowing has predictive value of > 90% for not having surgery. GREES suggests utilizing joint space narrowing (e.g., > 0.3-0.7 mm) combined with a lack of clinically relevant improvement in symptoms (e.g., greater than or equal to 20-25%) for 'failure' of a secondary outcome in structure modifying trials of the hip and knee. (C) 2004 OsteoArthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDo estrogens effectively prevent osteoporosis-related fractures?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Audan, M. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2000), 67

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See detailL'ostéoporose d'involution chez la femme
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Devogelaer, J. P.; Kaufman, J. M. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1999), 54(4), 335-40

Postmenopausal osteoporosis is now considered a major public health problem in aging women, due to the burden related to the consequent fractures. Over recent years, several pharmacological approaches ... [more ▼]

Postmenopausal osteoporosis is now considered a major public health problem in aging women, due to the burden related to the consequent fractures. Over recent years, several pharmacological approaches were developed for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Besides regular physical exercise and calcium rich diet, calcium supplementation can be suggested to both genders, after seventy years as well as systematic vitamin D supplementation in order to cope with the frequent lack observed in our country. Hormone replacement therapy is the first choice in prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Based on a careful evaluation of the needs of a postmenopausal woman as well as on the risk/benefit ratio derived from her individual risk factors, selective estrogen receptor modulators (raloxifene) or second generation bisphosphonates (alendronate) can be considered as alternative to estrogens. Due to its prohibitive cost, nasal calcitonin should be only considered for very specific cases. In osteoporosis confirmed by bone densitometry or by occurrence of fractures, bisphosphonate (alendronate) reduces subsequent fracture rate. Fluoride salts can, in some cases, improve spinal symptomatic osteoporosis. The use of etidronate, a molecule from the past, should be avoided as much as possible and, at any rate, strictly restricted to its legal indication including women with several vertebral crush fractures and severely decreased bone mineral density. [less ▲]

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See detailComment j'explore ... l'ostéoporose: mesure de la masse osseuse et analyses biologiques
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Devogelaer, J. P.; Kaufman, J. M. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1999), 54(3), 184-8

The use of bone densitometry, by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, allows the identification, at an early stage, of subjects who will, 15-20 years later, present a fracture event. Furthermore, this ... [more ▼]

The use of bone densitometry, by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, allows the identification, at an early stage, of subjects who will, 15-20 years later, present a fracture event. Furthermore, this technique is the most appropriate to confirm the efficacy of preventive or curative therapeutic approaches of osteoporosis. A balanced utilisation of biochemical tests is mandatory to exclude a secondary cause of osteoporosis, to help in the choice of the most appropriate therapeutic strategy and to evaluate the early response of patients to the administered drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of drugs intended for use in the treatment of male osteoporosis
Kaufman, JM; Compston, J; Audran, MA et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1999), 65

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See detailPoints to consider for the development of new indications for hormone replacement therapies and estrogen-like molecules
Stevenson, JC; GASPARD, Ulysse ULg; Avouac, B et al

in Climacteric : The Journal of the International Menopause Society (1998), 1

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See detailTwo years of replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency.
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Vandeweghe, M. et al

in Clinical Endocrinology (1997), 47(4), 485-494

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large groups of patients treated for more than one year. In addition, the optimal dose of rhGH for each patient and the baseline parameters that predict which patients will benefit most from therapy or will have adverse events are not entirely elucidated. DESIGN: 148 adult GHD patients were enrolled in a multicentre 2-year rhGH replacement study which was placebo controlled for the first six months. rhGH (Genotropin/Genotonorm Pharmacia & Upjohn) was given in a dose of 0.25 IU/kg/week sc (1.5 IU/m2/day). MEASUREMENTS: Every 3-6 months body composition was measured using body impedance analysis and general well being was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and social self-reporting questionnaire. At the same time patients had a full clinical examination and blood was sampled for glucose, HbA1c, IGF-1, creatinine, full blood count, thyroid hormones and liver function tests. RESULTS: With rhGH therapy IGF-1 levels increased from -2.00 +/- 2.60 SDS to 1.47 +/- 2.6 SDS after six months (P < 0.001), continued to rise despite no change in dose to 1.84 +/- 2.8 SDS after one year and remained constant thereafter (1.98 +/- 2.4 after 2 years). 56% of patients ultimately attained supranormal IGF-1 levels (+2 SD), 22% had levels below the mean, of which 9% were below -2 SD. Within 3 months lean body mass (LBM) increased by +5.09% (P < 0.001), total body water (TBW) by +5.40% (P < 0.001), while body fat (BF) dropped by -10.89% (P < 0.001) and waist circumference by -1.42% (P < 0.004). These effects were maintained during the first year of therapy, but the effect was attenuated after 24 months: LBM, +3.91% (P < 0.001); TBW, +3.28%, P < 0.001, BF, -6.42% (P < 0.001) and waist -2.22% (P < 0.009). Individual differences in response were large and could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters, except for a better response in males. Treatment resulted in a large and progressive improvement on the NHP scale, especially energy, emotions and sleep, but a similar change was also found in patients during placebo treatment. With rhGH the number of full days of sick leave/6 months decreased from 12.17 +/- 3.90 days (SEM) to 7.15 +/- 3.50 days after six months (P = 0.009), 2.93 +/- 1.55 days after 12 months (P = 0.01), 0.39 +/- 0.17 days after 18 months (P < 0.001) and 3.3 +/- 2.51 days after 24 months (P = 0.026). Similarly, the hospitalization rate went down from 14.9 to 7% after 6 months and remained at this level thereafter (P = 0.12). About one third of patients on rhGH experienced fluid-related adverse events, most often within the first 3 months. They usually disappeared spontaneously or responded well to dose reduction. Cumulative dropout rates were 29% after 1 year and 38% after two years. Two thirds of these patients stopped treatment because of insufficient subjective improvement. Neither drop-outs nor fluid retention could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed in a large group of patients the beneficial effects of rhGH therapy on body composition, metabolic parameters and general well-being and found a consistent drop in number of sick days and hospitalization rate. These effects were maintained during two years of therapy, except for an attenuation in body composition changes after 24 months. The high incidence of fluid-related adverse events suggests that it may be better to start with lower doses of rhGH and to increase the dose more slowly over a number of weeks. The finding of suboptimal high or low IGF-1 levels in many patients reinforces guidelines not to give rhGH in a weight-dependent dose but to titrate it individually for each patient. [less ▲]

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of agents used in the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis
Compston, JE; Audran, M; Avouac, B et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1996), 59

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See detailTwo years or replacement therapy in 148 adults with growth hormone déficiency in Belgium
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Mockel, J. et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of new chemical entities used in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Compston, JE; Jones, EA et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1995), 57

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See detailThe treatment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in adults : the 148 belgian patients
Beckers, Albert ULg; Moreau, L.; Mockel, J. et al

in The Endocrine Society : Annual meeting, Washington DC, June 1995 (1995)

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See detailCellular localization of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs in immature hypophysectomized rat testis and epididymis after in vivo hormonal treatment.
Dombrowicz, D.; Hooghe-Peters, E. L.; GOTHOT, André ULg et al

in Archives internationales de physiologie, de biochimie et de biophysique (1992), 100(5), 303-8

IGF-I and II genes expression has been localized by in situ hybridization in testis and epididymis of immature hypophysectomized rats treated in vivo with either pFSH, hLH, bGH, hPRL or with saline. IGF-I ... [more ▼]

IGF-I and II genes expression has been localized by in situ hybridization in testis and epididymis of immature hypophysectomized rats treated in vivo with either pFSH, hLH, bGH, hPRL or with saline. IGF-I mRNA expression was found in both Sertoli and Leydig cells after treatment with either FSH or LH. IGF-I mRNA was highly expressed in germ cells after FSH stimulation and to a lesser extent after GH or LH treatments. However, its expression was very low in hypophysectomized control or PRL treated rats. IGF-I mRNA was also expressed in stromal cells of epididymis after LH treatment and to a lesser extent after GH stimulation. In contrast, IGF-II mRNA expression was detected in all testicular cell types whatever the hormonal treatment (FSH, LH, GH, PRL). For each hormonal treatment testicular sections were examined after immunohistochemical staining with specific antisera against IGF-I and IGF-II. Both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical data were examined in order to determine the testicular sites of synthesis of IGF-I and IGF-II. [less ▲]

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See detailCyclical Cushing's disease : a case report.
Velkeniers, B.; Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg et al

in Pathology - Research & Practice (1991), 187(5), 603-607

A 41-year-old man with clinical Cushing's syndrome and intermittent central ACTH hypersecretion for a period of 9 1/2 years follow-up is described. Episodes of biochemical and clinical remission ... [more ▼]

A 41-year-old man with clinical Cushing's syndrome and intermittent central ACTH hypersecretion for a period of 9 1/2 years follow-up is described. Episodes of biochemical and clinical remission alternated with periods of florid Cushing's disease, characterized by circadian hyperpulsatile ACTH and cortisol secretion. Responses to metyrapone and inhibition of ACTH and cortisol hypersecretion after high dose dexamethasone during active phases of the disease favored a central origin of ACTH hypersecretion, confirmed by simultaneous bilateral venous sampling of the sinus petrosus inferior. Prolonged clinical remission followed near total anterior hypophysectomy. However, on anatomopathological examination of the pituitary neither corticotroph cell hyperplasia nor a microadenoma could be documented. The possibility of a functional ACTH hypersecretion is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCyclical Cushing's disease : a case report.
Velkeniers, B.; Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg et al

in Société Belge de Médecine Interne (1990)

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See detailLocalization of interleukin 6 mRNA in human tonsils by in situ hybridization.
Bosseloir, A.; Hooghe-Peters, E. L.; Heinen, Ernst ULg et al

in European Journal of Immunology (1989), 19(12), 2379-81

We have investigated which areas produce interleukin 6 (IL 6) in human tonsils. This growth factor is required for the terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasmocytes. Using 35S-labeled IL 6 ... [more ▼]

We have investigated which areas produce interleukin 6 (IL 6) in human tonsils. This growth factor is required for the terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasmocytes. Using 35S-labeled IL 6 cDNA we demonstrated IL 6 gene expression over various areas of the tonsils, with consistent exception of the follicles, by in situ hybridization. It is, therefore, proposed that B cells are stimulated during their migration out of the follicles. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscrepancy between prolactin (PRL) messenger ribonucleic acid and PRL content in rat fetal pituitary cells: possible role of dopamine
Hooghe-Peters, E. L.; Belayew, A.; Herregodts, P. et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (1988), 2(12), 1163-8

Data are controversial concerning the time when PRL-synthesizing cells are detected for the first time in the rat pituitary. Using a very sensitive immunocytochemical technique, we could visualize only a ... [more ▼]

Data are controversial concerning the time when PRL-synthesizing cells are detected for the first time in the rat pituitary. Using a very sensitive immunocytochemical technique, we could visualize only a few PRL cells before day 10 after birth. At that time, pituitary PRL was still 200 times less abundant than in the adult (on a tissue weight basis) whereas PRL mRNA per mg total RNA was only 80 times lower than in the adult. However, by in situ hybridization, we could demonstrate the presence of PRL mRNA in cells from fetal day 18 on. We have also followed the expression of GH gene in rat pituitary cells during development. In contrast to results obtained with PRL cells, quantitative analysis of cDNA probe hybridization to GH mRNA correlated well with measurements of immunostained cells. We found that PRL was released in the blood from fetal day 19 onwards. Thus, at that time PRL is synthesized and secreted but not stored. We therefore measured brain dopamine levels, and the data support the idea that the rise in dopamine levels after birth contributes to PRL storage. We confirmed in vitro that newborn pituitary cells can store PRL when cultured in the presence of dopamine. [less ▲]

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