References of "Vanderplanck, Maryse"
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See detailHow Does Pollen Chemistry Impact Development and Feeding Behaviour of Polylectic Bees?
Vanderplanck, Maryse; Moerman, Romain; Rasmont, Pierre et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(1), 9

Larvae and imagos of bees rely exclusively on floral rewards as a food source but host-plant range can vary greatly among bee species. While oligolectic species forage on pollen from a single family of ... [more ▼]

Larvae and imagos of bees rely exclusively on floral rewards as a food source but host-plant range can vary greatly among bee species. While oligolectic species forage on pollen from a single family of host plants, polylectic bees, such as bumblebees, collect pollen from many families of plants. These polylectic species contend with interspecific variability in essential nutrients of their host-plants but we have only a limited understanding of the way in which chemicals and chemical combinations influence bee development and feeding behaviour. In this paper, we investigated five different pollen diets (Calluna vulgaris, Cistus sp., Cytisus scoparius, Salix caprea and Sorbus aucuparia) to determine how their chemical content affected bumblebee colony development and pollen/syrup collection. Three compounds were used to characterise pollen content: polypeptides, amino acids and sterols. Several parameters were used to determine the impact of diet on micro-colonies: (i) Number and weight of larvae (total and mean weight of larvae), (ii) weight of pollen collected, (iii) pollen efficacy (total weight of larvae divided by weight of the pollen collected) and (iv) syrup collection. Our results show that pollen collection is similar regardless of chemical variation in pollen diet while syrup collection is variable. Micro-colonies fed on S. aucuparia and C. scoparius pollen produced larger larvae (i.e. better mates and winter survivors) and fed less on nectar compared to the other diets. Pollen from both of these species contains 24-methylenecholesterol and high concentrations of polypeptides/total amino acids. This pollen nutritional “theme” seems therefore to promote worker reproduction in B. terrestris micro-colonies and could be linked to high fitness for queenright colonies. As workers are able to selectively forage on pollen of high chemical quality, plants may be evolutionarily selected for their pollen content, which might attract and increase the degree of fidelity of generalist pollinators, such as bumblebees. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavioral response of Harmonia axyridis towards their footprints according to their physiological state
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse et al

Poster (2012, August)

In order to survive cold, the multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during winter. It has been recently highlighted that overwintering H. axyridis ... [more ▼]

In order to survive cold, the multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during winter. It has been recently highlighted that overwintering H. axyridis individuals lay an area marking while walking, which is used by conspecifics to locate aggregation sites. These footprints are made-up of hydrocarbons, comprising both saturated and unsaturated homologues. However, it has not been demonstrated whether this “following area marking” behavior is specific to the overwintering individuals. The work presented herein was oriented to the study of the chemical evolution of these footprints according to the physiological state of H. axyridis. Monthly GC-MS analyses revealed that the area marking contained a greater amount of di-unsaturated compounds when laid by overwintering ladybeetles, suggesting the great importance of these chemicals in the ladybeetles aggregation process. In the second instance, behavioral investigations conducted in a Y-shaped glass tube were performed to assess (1) the evolution of H. axyridis behavior towards their footprints and (2) whether this behavioral modification is due to an evolution of the ladybeetles sensitivity or rather to an evolution of the area marking attractiveness. The results revealed that only the overwintering individuals follow their area marking, and that this behavior is linked to the ladybeetle physiological state rather than to the chemical profile of the marking biomolecules. [less ▲]

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See detailMicro-quantitative method for analysis of sterol levels in honeybees and their pollen loads
Vanderplanck, Maryse; Michez, Denis; Vancraenenbroeck, Sophie ULg et al

in Analytical Letters (2011), 44(10), 1807-1820

A Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector method for characterization and micro-quantification of sterols was developed. The applicability of this method was evaluated for determining sterolic ... [more ▼]

A Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector method for characterization and micro-quantification of sterols was developed. The applicability of this method was evaluated for determining sterolic compounds in pollen loads, larvae, and adults of the honeybee. After a multi-step procedure to extract and purify sterols, the compounds were identified on the basis of their retention data and quantified on the basis of peak areas from analyses. Quantifications were feasible with a limited amount of samples, allowing single specimen analyses and estimation of inter-individual variation. The reliability of this microquantitative method for sterol analysis was also investigated. [less ▲]

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