References of "Vanderick, Sylvie"
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See detailBayesian single-step genomic evaluations combining local and foreign information in Walloon Holsteins
Colinet, Frédéric ULiege; Vandenplas, J.; Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege et al

in Animal (2017)

Most dairy cattle populations found in different countries around the world are small to medium sized and use many artificial insemination bulls imported from different foreign countries. The Walloon ... [more ▼]

Most dairy cattle populations found in different countries around the world are small to medium sized and use many artificial insemination bulls imported from different foreign countries. The Walloon population in the southern part of Belgium is a good example for such a small-scale population. Wallonia has also a very active community of Holstein breeders requesting high level genetic evaluation services. Single-step Genomic BLUP (ssGBLUP) methods allow the simultaneous use of genomic, pedigree and phenotypic information and could reduce potential biases in the estimation of genomically enhanced breeding values (GEBV). Therefore, in the context of implementing a Walloon genomic evaluation system for Holsteins, it was considered as the best option. However, in contrast to multi-step genomic predictions, natively ssGBLUP will only use local phenotypic information and is unable to use directly important other sources of information coming from abroad, for example Multiple Across Country Evaluation (MACE) results as provided by the Interbull Center (Uppsala, Sweden). Therefore, we developed and implemented single-step Genomic Bayesian Prediction (ssGBayes), as an alternative method for the Walloon genomic evaluations. The ssGBayes method approximated the correct system of equations directly using estimated breeding values (EBV) and associated reliabilities (REL) without any explicit deregression step. In the Walloon genomic evaluation, local information refers to Walloon EBV and REL and foreign information refers to MACE EBV and associated REL. Combining simultaneously all available genotypes, pedigree, local and foreign information in an evaluation can be achieved but adding contributions to left-hand and right-hand sides subtracting double-counted contributions. Correct propagation of external information avoiding double counting of contributions due to relationships and due to records can be achieved. This ssGBayes method computed more accurate predictions for all types of animals. For example, for genotyped animals with low Walloon REL (<0.25) without MACE results but sired by genotyped bulls with MACE results, the average increase of REL for the studied traits was 0.38 points of which 0.08 points could be traced to the inclusion of MACE information. For other categories of genotyped animals, the contribution by MACE information was also high. The Walloon genomic evaluation system passed for the first time the Interbull GEBV tests for several traits in July 2013. Recent experiences reported here refer to its use in April 2016 for the routine genomic evaluations of milk production, udder health and type traits. Results showed that the proposed methodology should also be of interest for other, similar, populations. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic evaluation for birth and conformation traits in dual-purpose Belgian Blue cattle using a mixed inheritance model
REIS MOTA, Rodrigo ULiege; Mayeres, P.; Bastin, Catherine et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2017)

The segregation of the causal mutation (mh) in the muscular hypertrophy gene in dual-purpose Belgian Blue (dpBB) cattle is considered to result in greater calving difficulty (dystocia). Establishing ... [more ▼]

The segregation of the causal mutation (mh) in the muscular hypertrophy gene in dual-purpose Belgian Blue (dpBB) cattle is considered to result in greater calving difficulty (dystocia). Establishing adapted genetic evaluations might overcome this situation through efficient selection. However, the heterogeneity of dpBB populations at the mh locus implies separating the major gene and other polygenic effects in complex modeling. The use of mixed inheritance models may be an interesting option because they simultaneously assume both influences. A genetic evaluation in dpBB based on a mixed inheritance model was developed for birth and conformation traits: gestation length (GL), calving difficulty (CD), birth weight (BiW), and body conformation score (BC). A total of 27,362 animals having records were used for analyses. The total number of animals in the pedigree used to build the numerator relationship matrix was 62,617. Genotypes at the mh locus were available for 2,671 animals. Missing records at this locus were replaced with genotype probabilities. A total of 13,221 (48.3%) were registered as dpBB, 1,287 (4.7%) as beef Belgian Blue, and 12,854 (47.0%) were unknown. From those 13,221dpBB animals, 650, 849, and 534 had double or single copies or no copy, respectively, of the causal mutation (mh) in the muscular hypertrophy gene, whereas 11,188 had missing genotypes. This heterogeneity at the mh locus may be the reason for high variability in the studied traits, that is, high heritability estimates of 0.33, 0.30, 0.38, and 0.43 for GL, CD, BiW, and BC, respectively. In general, additive (P < 0.05) and dominance (P < 0.001) allele substitution for calves and dams had significant impact for all traits. The moderate coefficient of genetic variation (27.80%) and high direct heritability (0.28) for CD suggested genetic variability in dpBB and possible genetic improvement through selection. This variability has allowed dpBB breeders to successfully apply mass selection in the past. Genetic trend means from 1988 to 2016 showed that sire selection for CD within genotype was progressively applied by breeders. The selection intensity was more important for CD in double-muscled lines than in segregated lines. Our study illustrated the possible confusion caused by the use of major genes in selection and the importance of fitting appropriate models such as mixed inheritance models that combine polygenic and gene content information. [less ▲]

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See detailImprovement of genetic evaluation systems for maternally influenced traits and multi-breed livestock populations
Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2017)

Animal breeding programs are designed to genetically improve livestock populations over many generations to enhance farm sustainability and competitiveness. Genetic improvement is achieved by selecting ... [more ▼]

Animal breeding programs are designed to genetically improve livestock populations over many generations to enhance farm sustainability and competitiveness. Genetic improvement is achieved by selecting genetically superior animals, based on estimated breeding values, to be the parents of the next generation. These estimated breeding values are calculated by solving mixed model equations characterizing appropriate statistical genetic evaluation models. To guarantee effective genetic selection, genetic evaluation models must be tailored to the specific characteristics of the traits and population under evaluation. This PhD thesis focused on the development of genetic evaluation models suitable for categorical maternally influenced traits and for multi-breed populations. Appropriate genetic animal models were developed and assessed: (1) for two categorical maternally influenced traits based on calving ease scores from Walloon Holstein dairy cattle and on lamb survival data from a New Zealand sheep population; (2) for two multi-breed populations based on milk yield records of New Zealand purebred and crossbred dairy cattle, and on purebred and crossbred calving ease scores from Walloon Belgian Blue and Holstein cattle. Results showed that (1) fitting maternal effects was required to avoid biasing the estimated breeding values, and there was no clear advantage in using non-linear mixed models instead of linear mixed models for the genetic analysis of the two categorical maternal traits studied; (2) breed-dependent breeding values could be estimated using the proposed multi-breed models, and that combining purebred and crossbred data had a positive influence on the accuracy of the breeding values of purebred animals. Finally, part of the research presented in this thesis contributed to the development of the genetic evaluation systems currently used in Walloon Region of Belgium and in New Zealand. [less ▲]

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See detailUsefulness of multi-breed models in genetic evaluation of direct and maternal calving ease in Holstein and Belgian Blue Walloon purebreds and crossbreds
Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege; Gillon, Alain; Glorieux, Géry et al

in Livestock Science (2017), 198

The objective of this study was to verify the feasibility of a joint genetic evaluation system for calving ease trait of Belgian Blue (BBB) and Holstein (HOL) Walloon cattle based on data of purebred and ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to verify the feasibility of a joint genetic evaluation system for calving ease trait of Belgian Blue (BBB) and Holstein (HOL) Walloon cattle based on data of purebred and crossbred animals. Variance components and derived genetic parameters for purebred BBB and HOL animals were estimated by using single-breed linear animal models. This analysis showed clear genetic differences between breeds. Estimates of direct and maternal heritabilities (± standard error) were 0.34 (±0.02) and 0.09 (±0.01) for BBB, respectively, but only 0.09 (±0.01) and 0.04 (±0.01) for HOL, respectively. Moreover, a significant negative genetic correlation between direct and maternal effects was obtained in both breeds: −0.46 (±0.04) for BBB and −0.29 (±0.11) for HOL. Variance components and derived genetic parameters for purebred BBB and HOL and crossbred BBB ×× HOL cattle were then estimated by using two multi-breed linear animal models: a multi-breed model based on a random regression test-day model (Model MBV), and a multi-breed model based on the random regression multi-breed model (Model MBSM). Both multi-breed models use different functions of breed proportions as random regressions, thereby enabling modelling different additive effects according to animal's breed composition. The main difference between these models is the way in which relationships between breeds are accounted for in the genetic (co)variance structure. Genetic parameters differed between single-breed and multi-breed analysis, but are similar to the literature. For BBB, estimates of direct and maternal heritabilities (±SE) were 0.45 (±0.07) and 0.08 (±0.01) by using Model MBV, and 0.45 (±0.08) and 0.09 (±0.02) for Model MBSM, respectively. For HOL, these estimates were 0.18 (±0.04) and 0.05 (±0.01) using Model MBV, and 0.16 (±0.04) and 0.05 (±0.01) for Model MBSM, respectively. Reliability gains (up to 25%) indicated that the use of crossbred data in the multi-breed models had a positive influence on the estimation of genetic merit of purebred animals. A slight re-ranking of purebred sires and maternal grandsires was observed between single-breed and multi-breed models. Moreover, both multi-breed models can be considered as quasi-equivalent models because they performed almost equally well with respect to MSE and correlations, for purebred and crossbred animals. [less ▲]

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See detailCapitalizing on fine milk composition for breeding and management of dairy cows
Gengler, Nicolas ULiege; Soyeurt, Hélène ULiege; Dehareng, Fréderic et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2016), 99

The challenge of managing and breeding dairy cows is permanently adapting to changing production circumstances under socio-economic constraints. If managing and breeding address different timeframes of ... [more ▼]

The challenge of managing and breeding dairy cows is permanently adapting to changing production circumstances under socio-economic constraints. If managing and breeding address different timeframes of action, both need relevant phenotypes that allow for precise monitoring of the status of the cows, and their health, behavior, and well-being as well as their environmental impact and the quality of their products (i.e., milk and subsequently dairy products). Milk composition has been identified as an important source of information because it could reflect, at least partially, all these elements. Major conventional milk components such as fat, protein, urea, and lactose contents are routinely predicted by mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry and have been widely used for these purposes. But, milk composition is much more complex and other nonconventional milk components, potentially predicted by MIR, might be informative. Such new milk-based phenotypes should be considered given that they are cheap, rapidly obtained, usable on a large scale, robust, and reliable. In a first approach, new phenotypes can be predicted from MIR spectra using techniques based on classical prediction equations. This method was used successfully for many novel traits (e.g., fatty acids, lactoferrin, minerals, milk technological properties, citrate) that can be then useful for management and breeding purposes. An innovation was to consider the longitudinal nature of the relationship between the trait of interest and the MIR spectra (e.g., to predict methane from MIR). By avoiding intermediate steps, prediction errors can be minimized when traits of interest (e.g., methane, energy balance, ketosis) are predicted directly from MIR spectra. In a second approach, research is ongoing to detect and exploit patterns in an innovative manner, by comparing observed with expected MIR spectra directly (e.g., pregnancy). All of these traits can then be used to define best practices, adjust feeding and health management, improve animal welfare, improve milk quality, and mitigate environmental impact. Under the condition that MIR data are available on a large scale, phenotypes for these traits will allow genetic and genomic evaluations. Introduction of novel traits into the breeding objectives will need additional research to clarify socio-economic weights and genetic correlations with other traits of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailSystème d'évaluations génomiques des bovins laitiers en Wallonie (Belgique)
Colinet, Frédéric ULiege; Vandenplas, Jérémie; Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege et al

Computer development (2015)

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See detailDerivation of a new lamb survival trait for the New Zealand sheep industry
Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege; Auvray, Benoit; Newman, Sheryl-Anne et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2015), 93

Previous research identified that a review of the current industry New Zealand lamb survival trait was necessary as its recording accuracy was reliant on farmers notifying their Sheep Improvement Limited ... [more ▼]

Previous research identified that a review of the current industry New Zealand lamb survival trait was necessary as its recording accuracy was reliant on farmers notifying their Sheep Improvement Limited bureau of lamb deaths. This paper reports the decision rules and genetic parameters for a new lamb survival trait for the New Zealand sheep industry. These rules define the new lamb survival trait (NEWSUR) using lamb birth fate (BFATE) codes and the presence/absence of lamb weight measurements. Six univariate animal models were tested and used to estimate variance or covariance components and the resulting direct and maternal heritabilities for NEWSUR. The models differed in the way they adjust for the effect of day of birth, the exclusion or inclusion of a litter (dam/year of birth) random effect and the application or not of a logit transformation of the phenotypes. For both the linear and logistic methods, models including the random effect of litter provided the best fit for NEWSUR according to log-likelihood values. Log-likelihoods for the linear and logistic models cannot be compared, therefore a cross-validation method was used to assess whether the logit transformation was appropriate by analyzing the predictive ability of the models. The mean square errors were slightly lower for the linear compared to the logistic model and therefore the linear model was recommended for industry use. The heritability attributed to direct effects ranged from 2 to 5.5%. A direct heritability of 5.5% resulted from a linear model without litter effect and omitting the effect of day of birth on survival, whereas a direct heritability of 2% resulted from the logistic model fitting a random litter effect. The heritability attributed to maternal genetic effects ranged from 1.9 to 7.7%. A maternal genetic heritability of 7.7% resulted from the logistic model omitting the litter effect, whereas a maternal genetic heritability of 1.9% resulted from the linear model fitting a random litter effect. The addition of the litter random effect decreased the maternal heritabilities substantially in all cases and was recommended for industry use to avoid overestimation of the maternal genetic variance. SIL has implemented NEWSUR and the associated genetic evaluation model based on information described in this paper. Industry wide implementation will enable sheep breeders to produce more accurate genetic evaluations to their commercial clients. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic parameters for direct and maternal calving ease in Walloon dairy cattle based on linear and threshold models
Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege; Troch, Thibault ULiege; Gillon, Alain et al

in Journal of Animal Breeding & Genetics (2014), 131(6), 513-521

Calving ease scores from Holstein dairy cattle in the Walloon Region of Belgium were analysed using univariate linear and threshold animal models. Variance components and derived genetic parameters were ... [more ▼]

Calving ease scores from Holstein dairy cattle in the Walloon Region of Belgium were analysed using univariate linear and threshold animal models. Variance components and derived genetic parameters were estimated from a dataset including 33,155 calving records. Included in the models were season, herd and sex of calf age of dam classes group of calvings interaction as fixed effects, herd year of calving, maternal permanent environment and animal direct and maternal additive genetic as random effects. Models were fitted with the genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive genetic effects either estimated or constrained to zero. Direct heritability for calving ease was about 8% with linear models and about 12% with threshold models. Maternal heritabilities were about 2% and 4%, respectively. Genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive effects was found to be not significantly different from zero. Models were compared in terms of goodness of fit and predictive ability. Criteria of comparison such as mean squared error, correlation between observed and predicted calving ease scores as well as between estimated breeding values were estimated from 85,118 calving records. The results provided few differences between linear and threshold models even though correlations between estimated breeding values from subsets of data for sires with progeny from linear model were 17% and 23 % greater for direct and maternal genetic effects, respectively, than from threshold model. For the purpose of genetic evaluation for calving ease in Walloon Holstein dairy cattle, the linear animal model without covariance between direct and maternal additive effects was found to be the best choice. [less ▲]

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See detailConsequences of Selection for Environmental Impact Traits in Dairy Cows
Kandel, Purna Bhadra ULiege; Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege; Vanrobays, Marie-Laure ULiege et al

in Proceedings, 10th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Production (2014, August)

Genetic selection programs aiming to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions require the estimation of genetic correlations with other production and economical traits and predicted selection response. CH4 ... [more ▼]

Genetic selection programs aiming to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions require the estimation of genetic correlations with other production and economical traits and predicted selection response. CH4 intensity was predicted from Mid-infrared spectra of milk samples from Holstein cows. Genetic correlations between CH4 intensity and milk yield (MY) was -0.68, fat yield (FY) -0.13, protein yield (PY) -0.47, somatic cell score (SCS) 0.07, longevity 0.05, fertility 0.31, body condition score (BCS) 0.17. Adding 25% relative weight on CH4 intensity to the current Walloon selection index, the response to selection would reduce CH4 intensity by 24%, increase MY by 30%, FY by 17%, PY by 29%, SCS by -14%, longevity by 24% but also reduce fertility by 11% and BCS by 13%. In conclusion, environmental traits can be added without jeopardizing production traits, but energy balance related traits have to be protected. [less ▲]

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See detailContributions à l’amélioration des systèmes d’évaluations génétiques
Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege; Gengler, Nicolas ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

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See detailConsequences of Selection for Environmental Impact Trait in Dairy Cows
Kandel, Purna Bhadra ULiege; Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege; Vanrobays, Marie-Laure ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2014, February 07)

Environmental sustainability is gaining importance in dairy industry due to enteric methane (CH4) emission from dairy cows. We predicted CH4 indicator trait (CH4 intensity: CH4 g/kg of milk) from Mid ... [more ▼]

Environmental sustainability is gaining importance in dairy industry due to enteric methane (CH4) emission from dairy cows. We predicted CH4 indicator trait (CH4 intensity: CH4 g/kg of milk) from Mid-infrared spectra of milk samples and recorded milk yield. Genetic correlations between CH4 intensity and milk production traits were estimated on Holstein cows from correlations of estimated breeding values. Genetic correlations between CH4 intensity and milk yield (MY) was -0.67, fat yield (FY) -0.13, protein yield (PY) -0.46, somatic cell score (SCS) 0.02, longevity -0.07, fertility 0.31, body condition score (BCS) 0.27 and average of confirmation traits -0.23. Currently, there is no CH4 emission trait in genetic evaluation selection index. Putting an hypothetical 25% weight on CH4 intensity on current Walloon genetic evaluation selection index and proportional reduction on other selection traits, the response to selection will be reduction of CH4 emission intensity by 24%, increase in MY by 30%, FY by 17%, PY by 29%, SCS by -15%, longevity by 24%, fertility by -11%, BCS by -13% and conformation traits by 24%. In conclusion, introduction of environmental traits in current selection index will affect selection responses. As there is no economic value of these traits presently alternative methods like putting correlated traits with clear economic value (e.g. feed efficiency) in the selection objective could generate appropriate index weights. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic evaluation of calving ease for Walloon Holstein dairy cattle
Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege; Troch, Thibault ULiege; Gillon, Alain et al

Conference (2013, August 25)

Calving complications have an incidence on the economic profitability of dairy herds. In the Walloon Region of Belgium, calving ease data recording is being done on voluntary basis since 2000. This allows ... [more ▼]

Calving complications have an incidence on the economic profitability of dairy herds. In the Walloon Region of Belgium, calving ease data recording is being done on voluntary basis since 2000. This allows now the implementation of a genetic evaluation of Holstein dairy cattle addressing the need of dairy breeders to select bulls in order to reduce frequency of calving problems. Calving ease scores were analyzed using univariate animal linear models, which were fitted with the genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive genetic effects either estimated or constrained to zero. Variance components and related genetic parameters were estimated from a dataset including 33,155 calving records. Included in the models were fixed season effects, fixed herd effects and fixed sex of calf*age of dam classes*group of calvings interaction effects, random herd*year of calving effects, random maternal permanent environment effects, and random animal direct and maternal additive genetic effects. For both models, direct and maternal heritabilities for calving ease were about 8% and about 2%, respectively. Genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive effects was found to be non-significantly different from zero. So, an animal linear model with genetic correlation between direct and maternal effects constrained to zero was adopted for the routine genetic evaluation of calving ease for Walloon Holstein dairy cattle. This model was validated by Interbull in January 2013 and, since April 2013, the Walloon Region of Belgium has officially participated to the international MACE evaluation for calving traits. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic evaluation of calving ease for Walloon Holstein dairy cattle.
Vanderick, Sylvie ULiege; Troch, Thibault ULiege; Gillon, Alain et al

in Interbull Bulletin (2013), 47

Calving complications have an incidence on the economic profitability of dairy herds. In the Walloon Region of Belgium, calving ease data recording is being done on voluntary basis since 2000. This allows ... [more ▼]

Calving complications have an incidence on the economic profitability of dairy herds. In the Walloon Region of Belgium, calving ease data recording is being done on voluntary basis since 2000. This allows now the implementation of a genetic evaluation of Holstein dairy cattle addressing the need of dairy breeders to select bulls in order to reduce frequency of calving problems. Calving ease scores were analyzed using univariate animal linear models, which were fitted with the genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive genetic effects either estimated or constrained to zero. Variance components and related genetic parameters were estimated from a dataset including 33,155 calving records. Included in the models were fixed season effects, fixed herd effects and fixed sex of calf*age of dam classes*group of calvings interaction effects, random herd*year of calving effects, random maternal permanent environment effects, and random animal direct and maternal additive genetic effects. For both models, direct and maternal heritabilities for calving ease were about 8% and about 2%, respectively. Genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive effects was found to be non-significantly different from zero. So, an animal linear model with genetic correlation between direct and maternal effects constrained to zero was adopted for the routine genetic evaluation of calving ease for Walloon Holstein dairy cattle. This model was validated by Interbull in January 2013 and, since April 2013, the Walloon Region of Belgium has officially participated to the international MACE evaluation for calving traits. [less ▲]

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