References of "Van Mele, Paul"
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See detailLinking farmers’ access to rural radio, gender and livelihoods: case study of rice processors in Benin
Zossou, Enangnon ULg; Vodouhe, Davo Simplice; Van Mele, Paul et al

Conference (2012, May 21)

As most of sub-Saharan Africa countries, Benin has noted a growth of rural radio stations over the past few decades as part of a broader process of democratisation. This paper examines the level of ... [more ▼]

As most of sub-Saharan Africa countries, Benin has noted a growth of rural radio stations over the past few decades as part of a broader process of democratisation. This paper examines the level of farmers’ access to rural radio in relation to gender and livelihood assets. The study was conducted in the north and south of Benin with 18 rural radio stations and 240 rice processors selected at random in 12 villages. We used the Sustainable Livelihoods (SL) framework with 120 rice processors randomly selected among the 240 surveyed rice processors. About 67% of the women rice processors had their own radio set compared to 87% of the men. Although the study did not allow to draw conclusions on causal relationships, rice processors who often listened to agricultural broadcasts had better social, financial and human capital stocks compared to those who didn’t listen to agricultural broadcasts. Despite the applaudable efforts of 72% of the radio stations to link up with extension services, half of the rice processors rarely or never listened to agricultural broadcasts, because the timing of the broadcasts was inappropriate. Interactive radio sessions with farmers that involve government officials will need to address this if they are to become more effective. [less ▲]

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See detailParticipatory impact assessment of rice parboiling videos with women in Benin
Zossou, Enangnon ULg; Van Mele, Paul; Wanvoeke, Jonas et al

in Experimental agriculture (2012), 48(3), 438-447

Using the sustainable livelihoods framework to evaluate the impact of a farmer-to-farmer video on the improved rice parboiling technology, women in Benin rated financial, social, human, natural and ... [more ▼]

Using the sustainable livelihoods framework to evaluate the impact of a farmer-to-farmer video on the improved rice parboiling technology, women in Benin rated financial, social, human, natural and physical capital stocks for the baseline year (2006) and the impact year (2009) on a 0–5 scale. Women who had watched the video and those who had not, but who lived in the same villages, perceived a significant improvement in four out of five livelihood capitals while processors in control villages did not perceive any significant change. Apart from testing the sustainable livelihoods conceptual framework as a participatory impact assessment tool for video-mediated rural learning, this study shows how farmer-to-farmer training videos helped to improve multiple livelihood assets. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of improved parboiling methods on the physical and cooked grain characteristics of rice varieties in Benin
Fofana, Mamadou; Wanvoeke, Jonas; Manful, John et al

in International Food Research Journal [=IFRJ] (2011), 18

The efficiency of traditional, intermediate and improved parboilers was compared through their effects on certain physical and cooking quality traits. Two varieties (NERICA 4 and Gambiaka) commonly ... [more ▼]

The efficiency of traditional, intermediate and improved parboilers was compared through their effects on certain physical and cooking quality traits. Two varieties (NERICA 4 and Gambiaka) commonly cultivated and consumed in Benin were used. Results showed that the traditional parboiler had the highest level of heat-damaged grains (90%) with the improved equipment having the least (17%). The improved and intermediate parboiling technology produced grains of comparable hardness (4 kg and 6 kg, respectively, for Gambiaka and NERICA 4) while the traditional method resulted in a sample with the least hardness for both Gambiaka (4 kg) and NERICA 4 (3 kg). The improved method and the intermediate technology using wooden sticks at the bottom of the vessel had higher water uptake (2.97 ml/grain) and grain swelling ratios (5.41) as compared to the traditional and intermediate methods using a container with a perforated bottom. [less ▲]

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See detailStrengthening local innovations in rice processing through video in Benin
Zossou, Enangnon ULg; Van Mele, Paul; Vodouhe, Davo Simplice et al

Conference (2010, November)

In Africa, rice processing provides employment for many rural people. A survey on local rice processing methods in the north, central and south of Benin shows that local rice is often parboiled before ... [more ▼]

In Africa, rice processing provides employment for many rural people. A survey on local rice processing methods in the north, central and south of Benin shows that local rice is often parboiled before milling. Rice parboiling is an important transformation process that contributes greatly to enhancing quality of rice. This important income generating activity is exclusively done by women from rice producing communities. In Benin, the traditional rice parboiling method is still prevailing and does not lead to quality rice. To address this, an improved rice parboiling technology was developed. AfricaRice subsequently developed a video where rural women explain how to use this improved technology. Four NGOs in central Benin publicly screened the video in 80 villages. After women watched the video, they started using the improved parboiler equipment individually or collectively. Women who didn’t have the financial support to buy the improved equipment understood its principle and developed creative solutions based on the idea of pre-cooking paddy with steam. Video watching also made women pay attention to reducing the loss of steam and to use local resources innovatively to conserve energy. Women also improved the quality of their parboiled rice by removing dirt, properly washing rice and drying rice on tarpaulins. On the other hand, in the north and south of Benin where there were no public video screenings, the traditional rice parboiling method is still predominant. This study shows the potential of farmer-to-farmer video to improve farmers’ practices and their attitudes to work collectively in agro-processing and marketing. [less ▲]

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See detailWomen groups formed in response to public video screenings on rice processing in Benin
Zossou, Enangnon ULg; Van Mele, Paul; Vodouhe, Davo Simplice

in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL SUSTAINABILITY (2010), 8(4), 270-277

When the Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice)1 introduced improved parboiling technology in Benin in 2006 through farmer-to-farmer video, it enhanced women’s creativity and motivation to parboil more and ... [more ▼]

When the Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice)1 introduced improved parboiling technology in Benin in 2006 through farmer-to-farmer video, it enhanced women’s creativity and motivation to parboil more and better the quality of rice. Their rice attracted more buyers and fetched a higher price which increased their profits and strengthened the women’s social cohesion. The video motivated women to start parboiling as a group and to express group-based requests for credit and training. However, newly established women’s groups in villages with strong negative experiences from the cotton sector did not last because of fear and mistrust. The video helped local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to improve their training methods and strengthened their relations with rural communities and between the women rice processors and input and output markets. Although these NGOs responded by facilitating access to micro-finance institutions, they were unwilling to provide credit to the groups because of past bad experiences. Instead, informal credit suppliers proved more responsive. Rice producers who attended the open-air video shows at the same time as the women rice processors became more willing to sell them rice on credit. We discuss the conditions and challenges of farmer-to-farmer video in creating organizational and institutional changes among service providers and rural entrepreneurs. [less ▲]

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See detailEnhancing rural learning, linkages, and institutions: the rice videos in Africa
Van Mele, Paul; Wanvoeke, Jonas; Zossou, Enangnon ULg

in Development in Practice (2010), 20(414), 421

Africa Rice Center (WARDA) facilitated the development and translation of 11 rice videos. From 2005 to 2009, WARDA partners translated them into more than 30 African languages. Open-air video ... [more ▼]

Africa Rice Center (WARDA) facilitated the development and translation of 11 rice videos. From 2005 to 2009, WARDA partners translated them into more than 30 African languages. Open-air video presentations enhanced learning, experimentation, confidence, trust, and group cohesion among rural people. The videos strengthened capacities of more than 500 organisations and hundreds of thousands of farmers. WARDA’s integrated rural learning approach also helped women to access new markets and credit. Learning videos allow for unsupervised learning; unleash local creativity and experimentation; facilitate institutional innovations; and improve social inclusion of the poor, youth, and women. [less ▲]

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See detailEntrepreneurial mindset and institutional innovations triggered by rice parboiling video in Benin
Zossou, Enangnon ULg; Van Mele, Paul; Vodouhe, Davo Simplice et al

Conference (2010, March 24)

To improve rice parboiling in Benin, an improved parboiling process with new equipment is being released. Farmer-to-farmer video (initiated by Africa Rice Center) was used by four local NGOs in the ... [more ▼]

To improve rice parboiling in Benin, an improved parboiling process with new equipment is being released. Farmer-to-farmer video (initiated by Africa Rice Center) was used by four local NGOs in the Department of Collines to disseminate the technology. In order to explore changes that have been made in this rural area following the use of this learning approach, 160 women and 17 women’s associations were surveyed in 16 villages where the video was shown. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected using focus groups, semi-structured interviews, participant observations, questionnaires and photographs. The video had not only improved women’s creative spirit, but also their motivation and awareness about the importance of parboiling as a revenue-generating activity. Women have become organized around rice parboiling leading to the creation of associations, more appeals to NGOs for additional training in rice parboiling, improved service delivery and improved packaging and marketing of parboiled rice. Improving women’s entrepreneurial spirit contributed to improving the quality of parboiled rice and therefore to an increase in its price, which increased women’s revenues and strengthened social cohesion. The video favored not only the improvement of extension methods used by facilitators, but also the strengthening of relationships among facilitators, rural communities, women processors, microfinance institutions, and input and output markets. Women had more access to formal credit because of their improved organization. Rice producers who attended the open-air video shows at the same time as the women rice processors became more willing to sell rice on credit to the women. The results of this study have allowed us to understand how video can favor the development of institutional innovations and reinforce relationships between facilitators and rural entrepreneurs. [less ▲]

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See detailComparing Farmer-to-Farmer Video with Workshops to Train Rural Women in Improved Rice Parboiling in Central Benin
Zossou, Enangnon ULg; Van Mele, Paul; Vodouhe, Davo Simplice et al

in Journal of Agricultural Education & Extension (2009), 15(4), 329-339

This article deals with the comparison of the conventional training based on two day community workshops and farmer-to-farmer video used as methodologies for the dissemination of improved rice parboiling ... [more ▼]

This article deals with the comparison of the conventional training based on two day community workshops and farmer-to-farmer video used as methodologies for the dissemination of improved rice parboiling process in Benin. From November 2007 to May 2008, we interviewed 160 women and 17 women groups who had been exposed to both, one or other of the methodologies. Data were analysed using ANOVA and logistic binomial regressions. Video reached more women (74%) than conventional training (27%). The conventional training was biased by participant selection, stakes in per diem payment and monopoly by the elite class. Video helped to overcome local power structures and reduced conflict at the community level. More than 95% of those who watched the video adopted drying their rice on tarpaulins and removed their shoes before stirring the rice, compared to about 50% of those who received traditional training and did not watch the video. Group use of the improved equipment was significantly higher for those who watched the video (pB0.05). By 2009, the various rice videos had been translated into over 30 African languages by Africa Rice Centre (Africa Rice) partners and involved 500 organizations and over 130,000 farmers. This study helps to give a better understanding of the role that farmer-to-farmer video could play in agricultural extension. This comparative analysis is an opportunity for a better understanding of how farmer-to-farmer video improves farmers’ practices and attitudes in agricultural technology dissemination. [less ▲]

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See detailThe power of video to trigger innovation: rice processing in central Benin
Zossou, Enangnon ULg; Van Mele, Paul; Vodouhe, Davo Simplice et al

in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL SUSTAINABILITY (2009), 7(2), 119-129

Understanding how to stimulate innovation among farmers and processors is crucial for attaining sustainable agriculture. To explore how farmer-to-farmer learning videos and training workshops changed ... [more ▼]

Understanding how to stimulate innovation among farmers and processors is crucial for attaining sustainable agriculture. To explore how farmer-to-farmer learning videos and training workshops changed women’s rice processing practices, we interviewed 200 women and 17 women’s groups in 20 villages in central Benin, including four villages which had received no intervention at all. Video on improved rice parboiling (a process whereby paddy is pre-cooked by steam without touching the water) had reached three times more women (74%) than hands-on training workshops organized by local NGOs and contributed to more equitable knowledge sharing within communities. In the villages where the NGOs had shown the video, 24% of the women started to use the improved parboiler equipment individually and 56% collectively within their group, compared to none in the control villages. About 92% of the women who attended both video and workshops developed creative solutions based on the idea of pre-cooking paddy with steam, compared to 72% for those who learned only through video. Fewer women innovated after learning through workshops only (19%) and after being informed by their peers (15%). Video watching also made women pay attention to reducing the loss of steam and to use local resources innovatively to conserve energy. More than 90% of the women who watched the video improved the quality of their parboiled rice, for example, by removing dirt, washing rice several times and drying rice on tarpaulins. Workshops stimulated innovations less than video did. Farmer-to-farmer video has great potential to enhance sustainable agriculture by encouraging local innovations. [less ▲]

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