References of "Van Maldergem, Lionel"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMutations in FKBP10 cause recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and bruck syndrome.
Kelley, B. P.; Malfait, F.; Bonafe, L. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011)

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and post-translational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal ... [more ▼]

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and post-translational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal dominant OI is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Bruck syndrome is a recessive disorder featuring congenital contractures in addition to bone fragility; Bruck syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in PLOD2 encoding collagen lysyl hydroxylase, while Bruck Syndrome type 1 has been mapped to 17q12 but the gene has remained elusive so far. Recently, the molecular spectrum of OI has been expanded with the description of the basis of a unique post-translational modification of type I procollagen, i.e. 3-prolyl-hydroxylation. Three proteins, cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl-3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1, encoded by the LEPRE1 gene), and the prolyl cis-trans isomerase cyclophilin-B (PPIB) form a complex that is required for fibrillar collagen 3-prolyl-hydroxylation and mutations in each gene have been shown to cause recessive forms of OI. Since then, an additional putative collagen chaperone complex, composed of FKBP10 (also known as FKBP65) and SERPINH1 (also known as HSP47), has also been shown to be mutated in recessive OI. Here, we describe five families with OI-like bone fragility in association with congenital contractures who all had FKBP10 mutations. Given the previous mapping of Bruck syndrome type 1 to the chromosomal region containing FKBP10, we conclude that FKBP10 mutations are the cause of Bruck syndrome type 1. (c) 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHuman TUBB3 mutations perturb microtubule dynamics, kinesin interactions, and axon guidance.
Tischfield, Max A; Baris, Hagit N; Wu, Chen et al

in Cell (2010), 140(1), 74-87

We report that eight heterozygous missense mutations in TUBB3, encoding the neuron-specific beta-tubulin isotype III, result in a spectrum of human nervous system disorders that we now call the TUBB3 ... [more ▼]

We report that eight heterozygous missense mutations in TUBB3, encoding the neuron-specific beta-tubulin isotype III, result in a spectrum of human nervous system disorders that we now call the TUBB3 syndromes. Each mutation causes the ocular motility disorder CFEOM3, whereas some also result in intellectual and behavioral impairments, facial paralysis, and/or later-onset axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Neuroimaging reveals a spectrum of abnormalities including hypoplasia of oculomotor nerves and dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, anterior commissure, and corticospinal tracts. A knock-in disease mouse model reveals axon guidance defects without evidence of cortical cell migration abnormalities. We show that the disease-associated mutations can impair tubulin heterodimer formation in vitro, although folded mutant heterodimers can still polymerize into microtubules. Modeling each mutation in yeast tubulin demonstrates that all alter dynamic instability whereas a subset disrupts the interaction of microtubules with kinesin motors. These findings demonstrate that normal TUBB3 is required for axon guidance and maintenance in mammals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIRF6 Screening of Syndromic and a priori Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: Identification of a New Type of Minor VWS Sign.
Desmyter, L.; Ghassibe, M.; Revencu, N. et al

in Molecular Syndromology (2010), 1(2), 67-74

Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), caused by dominant IRF6 mutation, is the most common cleft syndrome. In 15% of the patients, lip pits are absent and the phenotype mimics isolated clefts. Therefore, we ... [more ▼]

Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), caused by dominant IRF6 mutation, is the most common cleft syndrome. In 15% of the patients, lip pits are absent and the phenotype mimics isolated clefts. Therefore, we hypothesized that some of the families classified as having non-syndromic inherited cleft lip and palate could have an IRF6 mutation. We screened in total 170 patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P): 75 were syndromic and 95 were a priori part of multiplex non-syndromic families. A mutation was identified in 62.7 and 3.3% of the patients, respectively. In one of the 95 a priori non-syndromic families with an autosomal dominant inheritance (family B), new insights into the family history revealed the presence, at birth, of lower lip pits in two members and the diagnosis was revised as VWS. A novel lower lip sign was observed in one individual in this family. Interestingly, a similar lower lip sign was also observed in one individual from a 2nd family (family A). This consists of 2 nodules below the lower lip on the external side. In a 3rd multiplex family (family C), a de novo mutation was identified in an a priori non-syndromic CL/P patient. Re-examination after mutation screening revealed the presence of a tiny pit-looking lesion on the inner side of the lower lip leading to a revised diagnosis of VWS. On the basis of this data, we conclude that IRF6 should be screened when any doubt rises about the normality of the lower lip and also if a non-syndromic cleft lip patient (with or without cleft palate) has a family history suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMutations in GRIN2A and GRIN2B encoding regulatory subunits of NMDA receptors cause variable neurodevelopmental phenotypes.
Endele, Sabine; Rosenberger, Georg; Geider, Kirsten et al

in Nature Genetics (2010), 42(11), 1021-6

N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Two glycine-binding NR1 subunits and two glutamate-binding NR2 subunits each form highly Ca(2 ... [more ▼]

N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Two glycine-binding NR1 subunits and two glutamate-binding NR2 subunits each form highly Ca(2)(+)-permeable cation channels which are blocked by extracellular Mg(2)(+) in a voltage-dependent manner. Either GRIN2B or GRIN2A, encoding the NMDA receptor subunits NR2B and NR2A, was found to be disrupted by chromosome translocation breakpoints in individuals with mental retardation and/or epilepsy. Sequencing of GRIN2B in 468 individuals with mental retardation revealed four de novo mutations: a frameshift, a missense and two splice-site mutations. In another cohort of 127 individuals with idiopathic epilepsy and/or mental retardation, we discovered a GRIN2A nonsense mutation in a three-generation family. In a girl with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, we identified the de novo GRIN2A mutation c.1845C>A predicting the amino acid substitution p.N615K. Analysis of NR1-NR2A(N615K) (NR2A subunit with the p.N615K alteration) receptor currents revealed a loss of the Mg(2)(+) block and a decrease in Ca(2)(+) permeability. Our findings suggest that disturbances in the neuronal electrophysiological balance during development result in variable neurological phenotypes depending on which NR2 subunit of NMDA receptors is affected. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMechanisms for nonrecurrent genomic rearrangements associated with CMT1A or HNPP: rare CNVs as a cause for missing heritability.
Zhang, Feng; Seeman, Pavel; Liu, Pengfei et al

in American Journal of Human Genetics (2010), 86(6), 892-903

Genomic rearrangements involving the peripheral myelin protein gene (PMP22) in human chromosome 17p12 are associated with neuropathy: duplications cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A ... [more ▼]

Genomic rearrangements involving the peripheral myelin protein gene (PMP22) in human chromosome 17p12 are associated with neuropathy: duplications cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), whereas deletions lead to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Our previous studies showed that >99% of these rearrangements are recurrent and mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Rare copy number variations (CNVs) generated by nonrecurrent rearrangements also exist in 17p12, but their underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated 21 subjects with rare CNVs associated with CMT1A or HNPP by oligonucleotide-based comparative genomic hybridization microarrays and breakpoint sequence analyses, and we identified 17 unique CNVs, including two genomic deletions, ten genomic duplications, two complex rearrangements, and three small exonic deletions. Each of these CNVs includes either the entire PMP22 gene, or exon(s) only, or ultraconserved potential regulatory sequences upstream of PMP22, further supporting the contention that PMP22 is the critical gene mediating the neuropathy phenotypes associated with 17p12 rearrangements. Breakpoint sequence analysis reveals that, different from the predominant NAHR mechanism in recurrent rearrangement, various molecular mechanisms, including nonhomologous end joining, Alu-Alu-mediated recombination, and replication-based mechanisms (e.g., FoSTeS and/or MMBIR), can generate nonrecurrent 17p12 rearrangements associated with neuropathy. We document a multitude of ways in which gene function can be altered by CNVs. Given the characteristics, including small size, structural complexity, and location outside of coding regions, of selected rare CNVs, their identification remains a challenge for genome analysis. Rare CNVs may potentially represent an important portion of "missing heritability" for human diseases. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExome sequencing in Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome.
Johnson, Janel O; Gibbs, J Raphael; Van Maldergem, Lionel ULg et al

in American Journal of Human Genetics (2010), 87(4), 567-9569-70

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailType I hyperprolinemia: genotype/phenotype correlations.
Guilmatre, Audrey; Legallic, Solenn; Steel, Gary et al

in Human Mutation (2010), 31(8), 961-5

Type I hyperprolinemia (HPI) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with cognitive and psychiatric troubles, caused by alterations of the Proline Dehydrogenase gene (PRODH) at 22q11. HPI results ... [more ▼]

Type I hyperprolinemia (HPI) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with cognitive and psychiatric troubles, caused by alterations of the Proline Dehydrogenase gene (PRODH) at 22q11. HPI results from PRODH deletion and/or missense mutations reducing proline oxidase (POX) activity. The goals of this study were first to measure in controls the frequency of PRODH variations described in HPI patients, second to assess the functional effect of PRODH mutations on POX activity, and finally to establish genotype/enzymatic activity correlations in a new series of HPI patients. Eight of 14 variants occurred at polymorphic frequency in 114 controls. POX activity was determined for six novel mutations and two haplotypes. The c.1331G>A, p.G444D allele has a drastic effect, whereas the c.23C>T, p.P8L allele and the c.[56C>A; 172G>A], p.[Q19P; A58T] haplotype result in a moderate decrease in activity. Among the 19 HPI patients, 10 had a predicted residual activity <50%. Eight out of nine subjects with a predicted residual activity > or = 50% bore at least one c.824C>A, p.T275N allele, which has no detrimental effect on activity but whose frequency in controls is only 3%. Our results suggest that PRODH mutations lead to a decreased POX activity or affect other biological parameters causing hyperprolinemia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTemple-Baraitser syndrome: a rare and possibly unrecognized condition.
Jacquinet, Adeline ULg; Gerard, Marion; Gabbett, Michael T et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2010), 152A(9), 2322-6

Temple-Baraitser syndrome, previously described in two unrelated patients, is the association of severe mental retardation and abnormal thumbs and great toes. We report two additional unrelated patients ... [more ▼]

Temple-Baraitser syndrome, previously described in two unrelated patients, is the association of severe mental retardation and abnormal thumbs and great toes. We report two additional unrelated patients with Temple-Baraitser syndrome, review clinical and radiological features of previously reported cases and discuss mode of inheritance. Patients share a consistent pattern of anomalies: hypo or aplasia of the thumb and great toe nails and broadening and/or elongation of the thumbs and halluces, which have a tubular aspect. All patients were born to unrelated parents and occurred as a single occurrence in multiple sibships, suggesting sporadic inheritance from a de novo mutation mechanism. Comparative genomic hybridization in Patients 1, 2 and 3 did not reveal any copy number variations. We confirm that Temple-Baraitser syndrome represents a distinct syndrome, probably unrecognized, possibly caused by a de novo mutation in a not yet identified gene. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLoss-of-function mutations in ATP6V0A2 impair vesicular trafficking, tropoelastin secretion and cell survival.
Hucthagowder, Vishwanathan; Morava, Eva; Kornak, Uwe et al

in Human Molecular Genetics (2009), 18(12), 2149-65

Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2 (ARCL2), a syndrome of growth and developmental delay and redundant, inelastic skin, is caused by mutations in the a2 subunit of the vesicular ATPase H+-pump ... [more ▼]

Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2 (ARCL2), a syndrome of growth and developmental delay and redundant, inelastic skin, is caused by mutations in the a2 subunit of the vesicular ATPase H+-pump (ATP6V0A2). The goal of this study was to define the disease mechanisms that lead to connective tissue lesions in ARCL2. In a new cohort of 17 patients, DNA sequencing of ATP6V0A2 detected either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations. Considerable allelic and phenotypic heterogeneity was observed, with a missense mutation of a moderately conserved residue p.P87L leading to unusually mild disease. Abnormal N- and/or mucin type O-glycosylation was observed in all patients tested. Premature stop codon mutations led to decreased ATP6V0A2 mRNA levels by destabilizing the mutant mRNA via the nonsense-mediated decay pathway. Loss of ATP6V0A2 either by siRNA knockdown or in ARCL2 cells resulted in distended Golgi cisternae, accumulation of abnormal lysosomes and multivesicular bodies. Immunostaining of ARCL2 cells showed the accumulation of tropoelastin (TE) in the Golgi and in large, abnormal intracellular and extracellular aggregates. Pulse-chase studies confirmed impaired secretion and increased intracellular retention of TE, and insoluble elastin assays showed significantly reduced extracellular deposition of mature elastin. Fibrillin-1 microfibril assembly and secreted lysyl oxidase activity were normal in ARCL2 cells. TUNEL staining demonstrated increased rates of apoptosis in ARCL2 cell cultures. We conclude that loss-of-function mutations in ATP6V0A2 lead to TE aggregation in the Golgi, impaired clearance of TE aggregates and increased apoptosis of elastogenic cells. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGJA1 mutations, variants, and connexin 43 dysfunction as it relates to the oculodentodigital dysplasia phenotype.
Paznekas, William A; Karczeski, Barbara; Vermeer, Sascha et al

in Human Mutation (2009), 30(5), 724-33

The predominantly autosomal dominant disorder, oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) has high penetrance with intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability. Abnormalities observed in ODDD affect the eye ... [more ▼]

The predominantly autosomal dominant disorder, oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) has high penetrance with intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability. Abnormalities observed in ODDD affect the eye, dentition, and digits of the hands and feet. Patients present with a characteristic facial appearance, narrow nose, and hypoplastic alae nasi. Neurological problems, including dysarthria, neurogenic bladder disturbances, spastic paraparesis, ataxia, anterior tibial muscle weakness, and seizures, are known to occur as well as conductive hearing loss, cardiac defects, and anomalies of the skin, hair, and nails. In 2003, our analysis of 17 ODDD families revealed that each had a different mutation within the human gap junction alpha 1 (GJA1) gene which encodes the protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Since then at least 17 publications have identified an additional 26 GJA1 mutations and in this study, we present 28 new cases with 18 novel GJA1 mutations. We include tables summarizing the 62 known GJA1 nucleotide changes leading to Cx43 protein alterations and the phenotypic information available on 177 affected individuals from 54 genotyped families. Mutations resulting in ODDD occur in each of the nine domains of the Cx43 protein, and we review our functional experiments and those in the literature, examining the effects of 13 different Cx43 mutations upon gap junction activity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMutations in PYCR1 cause cutis laxa with progeroid features.
Reversade, Bruno; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Dimopoulou, Aikaterini et al

in Nature Genetics (2009), 41(9), 1016-21

Autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) describes a group of syndromal disorders that are often associated with a progeroid appearance, lax and wrinkled skin, osteopenia and mental retardation. Homozygosity ... [more ▼]

Autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) describes a group of syndromal disorders that are often associated with a progeroid appearance, lax and wrinkled skin, osteopenia and mental retardation. Homozygosity mapping in several kindreds with ARCL identified a candidate region on chromosome 17q25. By high-throughput sequencing of the entire candidate region, we detected disease-causing mutations in the gene PYCR1. We found that the gene product, an enzyme involved in proline metabolism, localizes to mitochondria. Altered mitochondrial morphology, membrane potential and increased apoptosis rate upon oxidative stress were evident in fibroblasts from affected individuals. Knockdown of the orthologous genes in Xenopus and zebrafish led to epidermal hypoplasia and blistering that was accompanied by a massive increase of apoptosis. Our findings link mutations in PYCR1 to altered mitochondrial function and progeroid changes in connective tissues. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRenal insufficiency, a frequent complication with age in oral-facial-digital syndrome type I.
Saal, S.; Faivre, L.; Aral, B. et al

in Clinical Genetics (2009)

Saal S, Faivre L, Aral B, Gigot N, Toutain A, Van Maldergem L, Destree A, Maystadt I, Cosyns J-P, Jouk P-S, Loeys B, Chauveau D, Bieth E, Layet V, Mathieu M, Lespinasse J, Teebi A, Franco B, Gautier E ... [more ▼]

Saal S, Faivre L, Aral B, Gigot N, Toutain A, Van Maldergem L, Destree A, Maystadt I, Cosyns J-P, Jouk P-S, Loeys B, Chauveau D, Bieth E, Layet V, Mathieu M, Lespinasse J, Teebi A, Franco B, Gautier E, Binquet C, Masurel-Paulet A, Mousson C, Gouyon J-B, Huet F, Thauvin-Robinet C. Renal insufficiency, a frequent complication with age in oral-facial-digital syndrome type I. The oral-facial-digital syndrome type I (OFD I) is characterized by multiple congenital malformations of the face, oral cavity and digits. A polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is found in about one-third of patients but long-term outcome and complications are not well described in the international literature. Renal findings have been retrospectively collected in a cohort of 34 females all carrying a pathogenic mutation in the OFD1 gene with ages ranging from 1 to 65 years. Twelve patients presented with PKD - 11/16 (69%) if only adults were considered -with a median age at diagnosis of 29 years [IQR (interquartile range) = (23.5-38)]. Among them, 10 also presented with renal impairment and 6 were grafted (median age = 38 years [IQR = (25-48)]. One grafted patient under immunosuppressive treatment died from a tumor originated from a native kidney. The probability to develop renal failure was estimated to be more than 50% after the age of 36 years. Besides, neither genotype-phenotype correlation nor clinical predictive association with renal failure could be evidenced. These data reveal an unsuspected high incidence rate of the renal impairment outcome in OFD I syndrome. A systematic ultrasound (US) and renal function follow-up is therefore highly recommended for all OFD I patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSevere cardiac phenotype of Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy in an infant with homozygous E189X BSCL2 mutation
Friguls, B.; Coroleu, W.; Del Alcazar, R. et al

in European Journal of Medical Genetics (2009), 52(1), 14-16

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGenomic deletions of OFD1 account for 23% of oral-facial-digital type 1 syndrome after negative DNA sequencing.
Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Franco, Brunella; Saugier-Veber, Pascale et al

in Human Mutation (2008), 30(2), 320-9

Oral-facial-digital type I syndrome (OFDI) is characterised by an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance with lethality in males. Clinical features include facial dysmorphism with oral, dental and distal ... [more ▼]

Oral-facial-digital type I syndrome (OFDI) is characterised by an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance with lethality in males. Clinical features include facial dysmorphism with oral, dental and distal abnormalities, polycystic kidney disease and central nervous system malformations. Considerable allelic heterogeneity has been reported within the OFD1 gene, but DNA bi-directional sequencing of the exons and intron-exon boundaries of the OFD1 gene remains negative in more than 20% of cases. We hypothesized that genomic rearrangements could account for the majority of the remaining undiagnosed cases. Thus, we took advantage of two independent available series of patients with OFDI syndrome and negative DNA bi-directional sequencing of the exons and intron-exon boundaries of the OFD1 gene from two different European labs: 13/36 cases from the French lab; 13/95 from the Italian lab. All patients were screened by a semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex method (QFMPSF) and relative quantification by real-time PCR (qPCR). Six OFD1 genomic deletions (exon 5, exons 1-8, exons 1-14, exons 10-11, exons 13-23 and exon 17) were identified, accounting for 5% of OFDI patients and for 23% of patients with negative mutation screening by DNA sequencing. The association of DNA direct sequencing, QFMPSF and qPCR detects OFD1 alteration in up to 85% of patients with a phenotype suggestive of OFDI syndrome. Given the average percentage of large genomic rearrangements (5%), we suggest that dosage methods should be performed in addition to DNA direct sequencing analysis to exclude the involvement of the OFD1 transcript when there are genetic counselling issues. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVariable phenotypes associated with 10q23 microdeletions involving the PTEN and BMPR1A genes
Menko, F. H.; Kneepkens, C. M.; de Leeuw, N. et al

in Clinical Genetics (2008), 74(2), 145-154

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCongenital genralized lipodystrophy in an Indian patient with a novel mutation in BSCL2 gene
Shirwalkar, H. U.; Patel, Z. M.; Magre, J. et al

in Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease (2008), 12

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA position effect on TRPS1 us associated with Ambras syndrome in humans and the Koala phenotype in mice
Fantauzzo, K. A.; Tadin-Strapps, M.; You, Y. et al

in Human Molecular Genetics (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCobblestone-like brain dysgenesis and altered glycosylation in congenital cutis laxa. Debre type
Van Maldergem, Lionel ULg; Yuksel-Apak, M.; Kayserili, H. et al

in Neurology (2008), 71(20), 1602-1608

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNovel causative mutations in patients with Nance-Horan syndrome and altered localization of the mutant NHS-A protein isoform
Shama, S.; Burdon, K. P.; Dave, A. et al

in Molecular Vision (2008), 14

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical findings and PDS mutations in 15 patients with hearing loss and dilatation of the vestibular aqueduct
Courtmans, I.; Mancilla, V.; Ligny, C. et al

in Journal of Laryngology and Otology (2007), 121(4), 312-317

Following systematic skull imaging of hundred and sixty seven individuals attending a medical referral centre for the deaf in Brussels, Belgium, fifteen patients (9 per cent) aged between two and 25 years ... [more ▼]

Following systematic skull imaging of hundred and sixty seven individuals attending a medical referral centre for the deaf in Brussels, Belgium, fifteen patients (9 per cent) aged between two and 25 years were diagnosed with dilatation of the vestibular aqueduct. Careful audiological study, with a baseline assessment then longitudinal follow up, indicated mild to profound deafness with a progressive course (i.e. an average loss of 3.3 dB per year) and frequent dizziness. Sequencing of PDS was performed in all individuals. Alterations of this gene (either homozygous, heterozygous or compound heterozygous base changes) were found in 53 per cent of patients with a large vestibular aqueduct. Four new mutations (two missense, a splice site and a four base pair insertion) were described. We were unable to confirm a correlation between homozygosity, heterozygosity and a Pendred or deafness-only phenotype. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)