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See detailCTIP2 is a negative regulator of P-TEFb.
Cherrier, Thomas ULg; Le Douce, Valentin; Eilebrecht, Sebastian et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013), 110(31), 12655-60

The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is involved in physiological and pathological events including inflammation, cancer, AIDS, and cardiac hypertrophy. The balance between its active ... [more ▼]

The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is involved in physiological and pathological events including inflammation, cancer, AIDS, and cardiac hypertrophy. The balance between its active and inactive form is tightly controlled to ensure cellular integrity. We report that the transcriptional repressor CTIP2 is a major modulator of P-TEFb activity. CTIP2 copurifies and interacts with an inactive P-TEFb complex containing the 7SK snRNA and HEXIM1. CTIP2 associates directly with HEXIM1 and, via the loop 2 of the 7SK snRNA, with P-TEFb. In this nucleoprotein complex, CTIP2 significantly represses the Cdk9 kinase activity of P-TEFb. Accordingly, we show that CTIP2 inhibits large sets of P-TEFb- and 7SK snRNA-sensitive genes. In hearts of hypertrophic cardiomyopathic mice, CTIP2 controls P-TEFb-sensitive pathways involved in the establishment of this pathology. Overexpression of the beta-myosin heavy chain protein contributes to the pathological cardiac wall thickening. The inactive P-TEFb complex associates with CTIP2 at the MYH7 gene promoter to repress its activity. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that CTIP2 controls P-TEFb function in physiological and pathological conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailHost-pathogen interactome mapping for HTLV-1 and -2 retroviruses.
Simonis, Nicolas; Rual, Jean-Francois; Lemmens, Irma et al

in Retrovirology (2012), 9

BACKGROUND: Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 both target T lymphocytes, yet induce radically different phenotypic outcomes. HTLV-1 is a causative agent of Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 both target T lymphocytes, yet induce radically different phenotypic outcomes. HTLV-1 is a causative agent of Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), whereas HTLV-2, highly similar to HTLV-1, causes no known overt disease. HTLV gene products are engaged in a dynamic struggle of activating and antagonistic interactions with host cells. Investigations focused on one or a few genes have identified several human factors interacting with HTLV viral proteins. Most of the available interaction data concern the highly investigated HTLV-1 Tax protein. Identifying shared and distinct host-pathogen protein interaction profiles for these two viruses would enlighten how they exploit distinctive or common strategies to subvert cellular pathways toward disease progression. RESULTS: We employ a scalable methodology for the systematic mapping and comparison of pathogen-host protein interactions that includes stringent yeast two-hybrid screening and systematic retest, as well as two independent validations through an additional protein interaction detection method and a functional transactivation assay. The final data set contained 166 interactions between 10 viral proteins and 122 human proteins. Among the 166 interactions identified, 87 and 79 involved HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 -encoded proteins, respectively. Targets for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proteins implicate a diverse set of cellular processes including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, the apoptosis, different cancer pathways and the Notch signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: This study constitutes a first pass, with homogeneous data, at comparative analysis of host targets for HTLV-1 and -2 retroviruses, complements currently existing data for formulation of systems biology models of retroviral induced diseases and presents new insights on biological pathways involved in retroviral infection. [less ▲]

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See detailHistone methyltransferase inhibitors induce HIV-1 recovery in resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected HAART-treated patients.
Bouchat, Sophie; GATOT, Jean-Stéphane ULg; Kabeya, Kabamba et al

in AIDS (London, England) (2012), 26(12), 1473-82

OBJECTIVE: Reactivation of HIV-1 expression in persistent reservoirs together with an efficient HAART has been proposed as an adjuvant therapy aimed at reaching a functional cure for HIV. Previously, H3K9 ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Reactivation of HIV-1 expression in persistent reservoirs together with an efficient HAART has been proposed as an adjuvant therapy aimed at reaching a functional cure for HIV. Previously, H3K9 methylation was shown to play a major role in chromatin-mediated repression of the HIV-1 promoter. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of histone methyltransferase inhibitors (HMTIs) in reactivating HIV-1 from latency. DESIGN: We evaluated the reactivation potential of two specific HMTIs (chaetocin and BIX-01294, two specific inhibitors of Suv39H1 and G9a, respectively) in ex-vivo cultures of resting CD4 T cells isolated from HIV-1-infected HAART-treated individuals. METHODS: We measured HIV-1 recovery in ex-vivo cultures treated with an HMTI alone or in combination with other HIV-1 inducers (in absence of IL-2 and of allogenic stimulation) of CD8-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or of resting CD4 T cells isolated from 67 HIV-infected, HAART-treated patients with undetectable viral load. RESULTS: We demonstrated, for the first time, that chaetocin induced HIV-1 recovery in 50% of CD8-depleted PBMCs cultures and in 86% of resting CD4 T-cell cultures isolated from HIV-1-infected, HAART-treated patients, whereas BIX-01294 reactivated HIV-1 expression in 80% of resting CD4 T-cell cultures isolated from similar patients. Moreover, we showed that combinatory treatments including one HMTI and either the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid or the non-tumor-promoting NF-kappaB inducer prostratin had a higher reactivation potential than these compounds alone. CONCLUSION: Our results constitute a proof-of-concept for the therapeutic potential of HMTIs in strategies aiming at reducing the pool of latent reservoirs in HIV-infected, HAART-treated patient. [less ▲]

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See detailLSD1 cooperates with CTIP2 to promote HIV-1 transcriptional silencing.
Le Douce, Valentin; Colin, Laurence; Redel, Laetitia et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2012), 40(5), 1904-15

Microglial cells are the main HIV-1 targets in the central nervous system (CNS) and constitute an important reservoir of latently infected cells. Establishment and persistence of these reservoirs rely on ... [more ▼]

Microglial cells are the main HIV-1 targets in the central nervous system (CNS) and constitute an important reservoir of latently infected cells. Establishment and persistence of these reservoirs rely on the chromatin structure of the integrated proviruses. We have previously demonstrated that the cellular cofactor CTIP2 forces heterochromatin formation and HIV-1 gene silencing by recruiting HDAC and HMT activities at the integrated viral promoter. In the present work, we report that the histone demethylase LSD1 represses HIV-1 transcription and viral expression in a synergistic manner with CTIP2. We show that recruitment of LSD1 at the HIV-1 proximal promoter is associated with both H3K4me3 and H3K9me3 epigenetic marks. Finally, our data suggest that LSD1-induced H3K4 trimethylation is linked to hSET1 recruitment at the integrated provirus. [less ▲]

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See detailThe AP-1 binding sites located in the pol gene intragenic regulatory region of HIV-1 are important for viral replication.
Colin, Laurence; Vandenhoudt, Nathalie; de Walque, Stephane et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(4), 19084

Our laboratory has previously identified an important intragenic region in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome, whose complete functional unit is composed of the 5103 fragment, the ... [more ▼]

Our laboratory has previously identified an important intragenic region in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome, whose complete functional unit is composed of the 5103 fragment, the DNaseI-hypersensitive site HS7 and the 5105 fragment. These fragments (5103 and 5105) both exhibit a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-inducible enhancer activity on the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. Here, we characterized the three previously identified AP-1 binding sites of fragment 5103 by showing the PMA-inducible in vitro binding and in vivo recruitment of c-Fos, JunB and JunD to this fragment located at the end of the pol gene. Functional analyses demonstrated that the intragenic AP-1 binding sites are fully responsible for the PMA-dependent enhancer activity of fragment 5103. Moreover, infection of T-lymphoid Jurkat and promonocytic U937 cells with wild-type and mutant viruses demonstrated that mutations of the intragenic AP-1 sites individually or in combination altered HIV-1 replication. Importantly, mutations of the three intragenic AP-1 sites led to a decreased in vivo recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the viral promoter, strongly supporting that the deleterious effect of these mutations on viral replication occurs, at least partly, at the transcriptional level. Single-round infections of monocyte-derived macrophages confirmed the importance of intragenic AP-1 sites for HIV-1 infectivity. [less ▲]

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See detailHIV-1 regulation of latency in the monocyte-macrophage lineage and in CD4+ T lymphocytes.
Redel, Laetitia; Le Douce, Valentin; Cherrier, Thomas ULg et al

in Journal of Leukocyte Biology (2010), 87(4), 575-88

The introduction in 1996 of the HAART raised hopes for the eradication of HIV-1. Unfortunately, the discovery of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in CD4+ T cells and in the monocyte-macrophage lineage proved the ... [more ▼]

The introduction in 1996 of the HAART raised hopes for the eradication of HIV-1. Unfortunately, the discovery of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in CD4+ T cells and in the monocyte-macrophage lineage proved the optimism to be premature. The long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs constitute a major obstacle to the eradication of HIV-1. In this review, we focus on the establishment and maintenance of HIV-1 latency in the two major targets for HIV-1: the CD4+ T cells and the monocyte-macrophage lineage. Understanding the cell-type molecular mechanisms of establishment, maintenance, and reactivation of HIV-1 latency in these reservoirs is crucial for efficient therapeutic intervention. A complete viral eradication, the holy graal for clinicians, might be achieved by strategic interventions targeting latently and productively infected cells. We suggest that new approaches, such as the combination of different kinds of proviral activators, may help to reduce dramatically the size of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in patients on HAART. [less ▲]

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See detailSynergistic activation of HIV-1 expression by deacetylase inhibitors and prostratin: implications for treatment of latent infection
Reuse, sophie; Calao, Miriam; Kabeya, Kabamba et al

in PLoS ONE (2009), 4(6), 6093

The persistence of transcriptionally silent but replication-competent HIV-1 reservoirs in Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART)-treated infected individuals, represents a major hurdle to virus ... [more ▼]

The persistence of transcriptionally silent but replication-competent HIV-1 reservoirs in Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART)-treated infected individuals, represents a major hurdle to virus eradication. Activation of HIV-1 gene expression in these cells together with an efficient HAART has been proposed as an adjuvant therapy aimed at decreasing the pool of latent viral reservoirs. Using the latently-infected U1 monocytic cell line and latently-infected J-Lat T-cell clones, we here demonstrated a strong synergistic activation of HIV-1 production by clinically used histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) combined with prostratin, a non-tumor-promoting nuclear factor (NF)- kappaB inducer. In J-Lat cells, we showed that this synergism was due, at least partially, to the synergistic recruitment of unresponsive cells into the expressing cell population. A combination of prostratin+HDACI synergistically activated the 5' Long Terminal Repeat (5'LTR) from HIV-1 Major group subtypes representing the most prevalent viral genetic forms, as shown by transient transfection reporter assays. Mechanistically, HDACIs increased prostratin-induced DNA-binding activity of nuclear NF-kappaB and degradation of cytoplasmic NF-kappaB inhibitor, IkappaBalpha . Moreover, the combined treatment prostratin+HDACI caused a more pronounced nucleosomal remodeling in the U1 viral promoter region than the treatments with the compounds alone. This more pronounced remodeling correlated with a synergistic reactivation of HIV-1 transcription following the combined treatment prostratin+HDACI, as demonstrated by measuring recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the 5'LTR and both initiated and elongated transcripts. The physiological relevance of the prostratin+HDACI synergism was shown in CD8(+)-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HAART-treated patients with undetectable viral load. Moreover, this combined treatment reactivated viral replication in resting CD4(+) T cells isolated from similar patients. Our results suggest that combinations of different kinds of proviral activators may have important implications for reducing the size of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in HAART-treated patients. [less ▲]

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See detailHIV-1 protease inhibitors do not interfere with provirus transcription and host cell apoptosis induced by combined treatment TNF-alpha plus TSA
Vandergeeten, Claire ULg; Quivy, Vincent; Moutschen, Michel ULg et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2007), 73(11), 1738-1748

HIV-1 latency represents a major hurdle to the complete eradication of the virus from patients under highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. One solution to this problem would be to ... [more ▼]

HIV-1 latency represents a major hurdle to the complete eradication of the virus from patients under highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. One solution to this problem would be to eliminate the latently infected cellular reservoirs by forcing gene expression in presence of HAART to prevent spreading of the infection by the newly synthesized viruses. Many studies have reported that a combination of a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) (i.e. TSA, NaBut, Valproic acid,...) with a pro-inflammatory cytokine (i.e. TNF alpha, IL-1,...) reactivates in a synergistic manner HIV-1 transcription in latently infected cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) used in HAART (such as Saquinavir, Indinavir, Nelfinavir, Lopinavir, Ritonavir and Amprenavir) could interfere with the potential purge of the cellular reservoirs induced by a combined treatment involving TSA and TNF alpha. We showed, in two HIV-1 latently infected cell lines (ACH-2 and U1) that all PIs efficiently inhibited release of mature viral particles but did neither affect cell apoptosis nor NF-kappa B induction and HIV-1 transcription activation following combined treatment with TNF alpha + TSA. This study is encouraging in the fight against HIV-1 and shows that PIs should be compatible with an inductive adjuvent therapy for latent reservoir reduction/elimination in association with efficient HAART regimens. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHistone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A sustains sodium pervanadate-induced NF-kappa B activation by delaying IkappaBalpha mRNA resynthesis : comparison with tumor necrosis factor alpha
Horion, Julie ULg; Gloire, Geoffrey ULg; El Mjiyad, Nadia et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2007), 282(21), 15383

NF-kappaB is a crucial transcription factor tightly regulated by protein interactions and post-translational modifications, like phosphorylation and acetylation. A previous study has shown that ... [more ▼]

NF-kappaB is a crucial transcription factor tightly regulated by protein interactions and post-translational modifications, like phosphorylation and acetylation. A previous study has shown that trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, potentiates tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha-elicited NF-kappaB activation and delays IkappaBalpha cytoplasmic reappearance. Here, we demonstrated that TSA also prolongs NF-kappaB activation when induced by the insulino-mimetic pervanadate (PV), a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor that initiates an atypical NF-kappaB signaling. This extension is similarly correlated with delayed IkappaBalpha cytoplasmic reappearance. However, whereas TSA causes a prolonged IKK activity when addedtoTNFalpha, it does notwhenaddedtoPV.Instead, quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed a decrease of ikappabalphamRNAlevel after TSA addition to PV stimulation. This synthesis deficit of the inhibitor could explain the sustained NF-kappaB residence in the nucleus. In vivo analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays uncovered that, forPVinduction but not forTNFalpha, the presence of TSA provokes several impairments on the ikappabalphapromoter: (i) diminution of RNA Pol II recruitment; (ii) reduced acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3-Lys14 and -Ser10, respectively; (iii) decreased presence of phosphorylated p65-Ser536; and (iv) reduction of IKKalphabinding. The recruitment of these proteins on the icam-1 promoter, another NF-kappaB-regulated gene, is not equally affected, suggesting a promoter specificity of PV with TSA stimulation. Taken together, these data suggest that TSA acts differently depending on the NF-kappaB pathway and the targeted promoter in question. This indicates that one overall histone deacetylase role is to inhibit NF-kappaB activation by molecular mechanisms specific of the stimulus and the promoter. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax oncoprotein regulates G-protein signaling.
Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg; Springael, Jean-Yves; Boxus, Mathieu ULg et al

in Blood (2007), 109(3), 1051-60

Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and neurological syndromes. HTLV-1 encodes the oncoprotein Tax-1, which modulates viral and cellular gene ... [more ▼]

Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and neurological syndromes. HTLV-1 encodes the oncoprotein Tax-1, which modulates viral and cellular gene expression leading to T-cell transformation. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins known and are involved in the regulation of most biological functions. Here, we report an interaction between HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein and the G-protein beta subunit. Interestingly, though the G-protein beta subunit inhibits Tax-mediated viral transcription, Tax-1 perturbs G-protein beta subcellular localization. Functional evidence for these observations was obtained using conditional Tax-1-expressing transformed T-lymphocytes, where Tax expression correlated with activation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Our data indicated that HTLV-1 developed a strategy based on the activation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in the infected cell; this could have tremendous implications for new therapeutic strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailPotentiation of tumor necrosis factor-induced NF-kappa B activation by deacetylase inhibitors is associated with a delayed cytoplasmic reappearance of I kappa B alpha (vol 23, pg 6200, 2003)
Adam, Emmanuelle; Quivy, Vincent; Bex, Françoise et al

in Molecular and Cellular Biology (2004), 24(15), 6890

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See detailCytoplasmic I kappa B alpha increases NF-kappa B-independent transcription through binding to histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 and HDAC3
Viatour, Patrick ULg; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie; van Lint, Carine et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(47), 46541-46548

IkappaBalpha is an inhibitory molecule that sequesters NF-kappaB dimers in the cytoplasm of unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation, NF-kappaB moves to the nucleus and induces the expression of a variety of ... [more ▼]

IkappaBalpha is an inhibitory molecule that sequesters NF-kappaB dimers in the cytoplasm of unstimulated cells. Upon stimulation, NF-kappaB moves to the nucleus and induces the expression of a variety of genes including IkappaBalpha. This newly synthesized IkappaBalpha also translocates to the nucleus, removes activated NF-kappaB from its target genes, and brings it back to the cytoplasm to terminate the phase of NF-kappaB activation. We show here that IkappaBalpha enhances the transactivation potential of several homeodomain-containing proteins such as HOXB7 and Pit-1 through a NF-kappaB-independent association with histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 and HDAC3 but not with HDAC2, -4, -5, and -6. IkappaBalpha bound both HDAC proteins through its ankyrin repeats, and this interaction was disrupted by p65. Immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated further that IkappaBalpha acts by partially redirecting HDAC3 to the cytoplasm. At the same time, an IkappaBalpha mutant, which lacked a functional nuclear localization sequence, interacted very efficiently with HDAC1 and -3 and intensively enhanced the transactivation potential of Pit-1. Our results support the hypothesis that the NF-kappaB inhibitor IkappaBalpha regulates the transcriptional activity of homeodomain-containing proteins positively through cytoplasmic sequestration of HDAC1 and HDAC3, a mechanism that would assign a new and unexpected role to IkappaBalpha. [less ▲]

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See detailPotentiation of tumor necrosis factor-induced NF-kappa B activation by deacetylase inhibitors is associated with a delayed cytoplasmic reappearance of I kappa B alpha
Adam, Emmanuelle; Quivy, Vincent; Bex, Françoise et al

in Molecular and Cellular Biology (2003), 23(17), 6200-6209

Previous studies have implicated acetylases and deacetylases in regulating the transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB. Here, we show that inhibitors of deacetylases such as trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have implicated acetylases and deacetylases in regulating the transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB. Here, we show that inhibitors of deacetylases such as trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium butyrate (NaBut) potentiated TNF-induced expression of several natural NF-kappaB-driven promoters. This transcriptional synergism observed between TNF and TSA (or NaBut) required intact kappaB sites in all promoters tested and was biologically relevant as demonstrated by RNase protection on two instances of endogenous NF-kappaB-regulated gene transcription. Importantly, TSA prolonged both TNF-induced DNA-binding activity and the presence of NF-kappaKB in the nucleus. We showed that the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB was acetylated in vivo. However, this acetylation was weak, suggesting that other mechanisms could be implicated in the potentiated binding and transactivation activities of NF-kappaB after TNF plus TSA versus TNF treatment. Western blot and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy experiments revealed a delay in the cytoplasmic reappearance of the IkappaBalpha inhibitor that correlated temporally with the prolonged intranuclear binding and presence of NF-kappaB. This delay was due neither to a defect in IkappaBalpha mRNA production nor to a nuclear retention of IkappaBalpha but was rather due to a persistent proteasome-mediated degradation of IkappaBalpha. A prolongation of IkappaB kinase activity could explain, at least partially, the delayed IkappaBalpha cytoplasmic reappearance observed in presence of TNF plus TSA. [less ▲]

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See detailSynergistic activation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 promoter activity by NF-kappa B and inhibitors of deacetylases: Potential perspectives for the development of therapeutic strategies
Quivy, Vincent; Adam, Emmanuelle; Collette, Yves et al

in Journal of Virology (2002), 76(21), 11091-11103

The transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a central role in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activation pathway. HIV-1 transcription is also regulated by protein acetylation, since treatment ... [more ▼]

The transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a central role in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activation pathway. HIV-1 transcription is also regulated by protein acetylation, since treatment with deacetylase inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA) or sodium butyrate (NaBut) markedly induces HIV-1 transcriptional activity of the long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. Here, we demonstrate that TSA (NaBut) synergized with both ectopically expressed p50/p65 and tumor necrosis factor alpha/SF2 (TNF)-induced NF-kappaB to activate the LTR. This was confirmed for LTRs from subtypes A through G of the HIV-1 major group, with a positive correlation between the number Of kappaB sites present in the LTRs and the amplitude of the TNF-TSA synergism. Mechanistically, TSA (NaBut) delayed the cytoplasmic recovery of the inhibitory protein IkappaBalpha. This coincided with a prolonged intranuclear presence and DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB. The physiological relevance of the TNF-TSA (NaBut) synergism was shown on HIV-1 replication in both acutely and latently HIV-infected cell lines. Therefore, our results open new therapeutic strategies aimed at decreasing or eliminating the pool of latently HIV-infected reservoirs by forcing viral expression. [less ▲]

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See detailInteracting surface of the receptor-binding domain.
GATOT, Jean-Stéphane ULg; Callebaut, Isabelle; Van Lint, Carine et al

in Société Belge de Biochimie et de Biologie moléculaire. (2002, February 22)

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See detailCBP and histone deacetylase inhibition enhance the transactivation potential of the HOXB7 homeodomain-containing protein
Chariot, Alain ULg; Van Lint, Carine; Chapelier, Muriel et al

in Oncogene (1999), 18

Homeodomain-containing proteins are transcription factors regulating the coordinated expression of multiple target genes involved in development, differentiation and cellular transformation. In this study ... [more ▼]

Homeodomain-containing proteins are transcription factors regulating the coordinated expression of multiple target genes involved in development, differentiation and cellular transformation. In this study, we demonstrated that HOXB7, one member of this family, behaved as a transactivator in breast cancer cells. Deletion of either the HOXB7 N-terminal domain or the C-terminal acidic tail abolished this transcriptional effect, suggesting a combination of distinct functional transactivating domains. HOXB7 physically interacted both in vitro and in vivo with the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). This interaction led to an enhanced transactivating potential and required the N-terminal of HOXB7 as well as two domains located at the C-terminal part of CBP. Moreover, trichostatin A, a deacetylase inhibitor, strongly enhanced the transcriptional properties of HOXB7. Our data therefore indicate that HOX proteins can directly interact with CBP and that acetylation/deacetylation may regulate their transcriptional properties. [less ▲]

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