References of "Van Beeumen, G"
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See detailOrgan Procurement After Euthanasia: Belgian Experience
Ysebaert, dirk; Van Beeumen, G.; De Greef, K. et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41

Euthanasia was legalized in Belgium in 2002 for adults under strict conditions. The patient must be in a medically futile condition and of constant and unbearable physical or mental suffering that cannot ... [more ▼]

Euthanasia was legalized in Belgium in 2002 for adults under strict conditions. The patient must be in a medically futile condition and of constant and unbearable physical or mental suffering that cannot be alleviated, resulting from a serious and incurable disorder caused by illness or accident. Between 2005 and 2007, 4 patients (3 in Antwerp and 1 in Liège) expressed their will for organ donation after their request for euthanasia was granted. Patients were aged 43 to 50 years and had a debilitating neurologic disease, either after severe cerebrovascular accident or primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Ethical boards requested complete written scenario with informed consent of donor and relatives, clear separation between euthanasia and organ procurement procedure, and all procedures to be performed by senior staff members and nursing staff on a voluntary basis. The euthanasia procedure was performed by three independent physicians in the operating room. After clinical diagnosis of cardiac death, organ procurement was performed by femoral vessel cannulation or quick laparotomy. In 2 patients, the liver, both kidneys, and pancreatic islets (one case) were procured and transplanted; in the other 2 patients, there was additional lung procurement and transplantation. Transplant centers were informed of the nature of the case and the elements of organ procurement. There was primary function of all organs. The involved physicians and transplant teams had the well-discussed opinion that this strong request for organ donation after euthanasia could not be waived. A clear separation between the euthanasia request, the euthanasia procedure, and the organ procurement procedure is necessary. [less ▲]

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See detailAn 11 - Year Overview of the belgian donor and transplant statistics bsed on a consecutive yearly data follow-up and comparing two periods : 1997 to 2005 versus 2006 to 2007
Van Gelder, F.; Delbouille, Marie-Hélène ULg; Vandervennet, M. et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41

Background. The Belgian Transplant Coordinators Section is responsible for the yearly data follow-up concerning donor and transplantation statistics in Belgium and presents herein a 10-year overview ... [more ▼]

Background. The Belgian Transplant Coordinators Section is responsible for the yearly data follow-up concerning donor and transplantation statistics in Belgium and presents herein a 10-year overview. Methods. The procurement and transplant statistics were compared between 2 periods: Period 1 (P1, 1997–2005) versus Period 2 (P2, 2006–2007). Results. The kidney and liver waiting lists (P1 vs P2) showed an overall decrease for a period of 2 consecutive years in P2; kidney ( 170 patients; 18%), and liver ( 83 patients; 34%). All other waiting lists (heart, lung, pancreas) remained stable. Mean ED further increased (P1 vs P2); 229 (P1) versus 280 (P2, 22.27%). Non–heart-beating donors were significantly ( 288%) more often procured in P2. Mean donor age was 37.9 17.8 years (P1) versus 46.5 19.9 years (P2), and mean organ yield per donor was 3.48 1.7 (P1) versus 3.38 1.8 (P2). Overall transplant activity per million inhabitants increased 21.1%. Conclusion. For 2 consecutive years, the Belgian statistics showed significantly increased donor activity with an impact on waiting list dynamics and transplantation. The mean organ yield per donor was not influenced despite an increased average age and change in reason for death. [less ▲]

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See detailOverview of the Belgian Donor and Transplant Statistics 2006: Results of Consecutive Yearly Data Follow-up by the Belgian Section of Transplant Coordinators
Van Gelder, F.; Delbouille, Marie-Hélène ULg; Vandervennet, M. et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2007), 39

Background. The Belgian Section of Transplant Coordinators, created in 1997 under the auspices of the Belgian Transplant Society, is in charge of the collection of the national data about donor ... [more ▼]

Background. The Belgian Section of Transplant Coordinators, created in 1997 under the auspices of the Belgian Transplant Society, is in charge of the collection of the national data about donor/procurement activities. Methods. Data are collected in all Belgian transplant centers. An annual report is finalized by combining these data with data from the Eurotransplant database. Results. An increase of both potential donors (n 501, 14.4%) and effective donors (n 273, 16.7%) was observed in 2006 versus 2005. Among effective donors, 28 were non–heart-beating donors (10.25%). Overall donor ratio was 26.26 donors per million inhabitants. Within potential donors, absence of organ harvesting was due to medical contraindications (28%), family refusal (13%), or legal refusal (2%). Donor mean age was 46.4 years and mean organs/donor was 3.21 1.7. An overall reduction of Belgian waiting lists was observed in 2006 as compared with 2005 ( 5.7% for kidney, 25.7% for liver, 9.4% for heart, 6.7% for lung, and 11.7% for pancreas), while waiting list mortality was 18% for liver, 11% for heart, and 7% for lung. As compared with 2005, transplant activities increased for kidney (n 485, 24.3%), heart lungs (n 73, 7.3%), and lungs (n 83, 39.4%) but decreased for liver (n 236, 2.1%). Living donation represented 8.45% for kidney ( 28.1% vs 2005) and 8% for liver transplantation ( 29.6%). Conclusion. Globally, a marked increase of procurement and transplant activities was observed in 2006, allowing to limit waiting list and waiting list mortality. Further increase of living donor activity and non–heart-beating donation remains necessary to extend the donor pool. [less ▲]

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