References of "Van Bambeke, F"
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See detailInteractions Of Ciprofloxacin With Dppc And Dppg: Fluorescence Anisotropy, Atr-Ftir And P-31 Nmr Spectroscopies And Conformational Analysis
Bensikaddour, H.; Snoussi, K.; Lins, Laurence ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Biomembranes (2008), 1778(11), 2535-43

The interactions between a drug and lipids may be critical for the pharmacological activity. We previously showed that the ability of a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin, to induce disorder and ... [more ▼]

The interactions between a drug and lipids may be critical for the pharmacological activity. We previously showed that the ability of a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin, to induce disorder and modify the orientation of the acyl chains is related to its propensity to be expelled from a monolayer upon compression [1]. Here, we compared the binding of ciprofloxacin on DPPC and DPPG liposomes (or mixtures of phospholipids [DOPC:DPPC], and [DOPC:DPPG]) using quasi-elastic light scattering and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy. We also investigated ciprofloxacin effects on the transition temperature (T(m)) of lipids and on the mobility of phosphate head groups using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared-Red Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) respectively. In the presence of ciprofloxacin we observed a dose-dependent increase of the size of the DPPG liposomes whereas no effect was evidenced for DPPC liposomes. The binding constants K(app) were in the order of 10(5) M(-1) and the affinity appeared dependent on the negative charge of liposomes: DPPG>DOPC:DPPG (1:1; M:M)>DPPC>DOPC:DPPC (1:1; M:M). As compared to the control samples, the chemical shift anisotropy (Deltasigma) values determined by (31)P NMR showed an increase of 5 and 9 ppm for DPPC:CIP (1:1; M:M) and DPPG:CIP (1:1; M:M) respectively. ATR-FTIR experiments showed that ciprofloxacin had no effect on the T(m) of DPPC but increased the order of the acyl chains both below and above this temperature. In contrast, with DPPG, ciprofloxacin induced a marked broadening effect on the transition with a decrease of the acyl chain order below its T(m) and an increase above this temperature. Altogether with the results from the conformational analysis, these data demonstrated that the interactions of ciprofloxacin with lipids depend markedly on the nature of their phosphate head groups and that ciprofloxacin interacts preferentially with anionic lipid compounds, like phosphatidylglycerol, present at a high content in these membranes. [less ▲]

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See detailPiracetam Inhibits The Lipid-Destabilising Effect Of The Amyloid Peptide A Beta C-Terminal Fragment
Mingeot-Leclercq, Mp.; Lins, Laurence ULg; Bensliman, M. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Biomembranes (2003), 1609(1), 28-38

Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is a 40/42-residue proteolytic fragment of a precursor protein (APP), implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The hypothesis that interactions between Abeta ... [more ▼]

Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is a 40/42-residue proteolytic fragment of a precursor protein (APP), implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The hypothesis that interactions between Abeta aggregates and neuronal membranes play an important role in toxicity has gained some acceptance. Previously, we showed that the C-terminal domain (e.g. amino acids 29-42) of Abeta induces membrane permeabilisation and fusion, an effect which is related to the appearance of non-bilayer structures. Conformational studies showed that this peptide has properties similar to those of the fusion peptide of viral proteins i.e. a tilted penetration into membranes. Since piracetam interacts with lipids and has beneficial effects on several symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, we investigated in model membranes the ability of piracetam to hinder the destabilising effect of the Abeta 29-42 peptide. Using fluorescence studies and 31P and 2H NMR spectroscopy, we have shown that piracetam was able to significantly decrease the fusogenic and destabilising effect of Abeta 29-42, in a concentration-dependent manner. While the peptide induced lipid disorganisation and subsequent negative curvature at the membrane-water interface, the conformational analysis showed that piracetam, when preincubated with lipids, coats the phospholipid headgroups. Calculations suggest that this prevents appearance of the peptide-induced curvature. In addition, insertion of molecules with an inverted cone shape, like piracetam, into the outer membrane leaflet should make the formation of such structures energetically less favourable and therefore decrease the likelihood of membrane fusion. [less ▲]

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See detailMembrane Destabilization Induced By Beta-Amyloid Peptide 29-42: Importance Of The Amino-Terminus
Mingeot-Leclercq, Mp.; Lins, Laurence ULg; Bensliman, M. et al

in Chemistry and Physics of Lipids (2002), 120(1-2), 57-74

Increasing evidence implicates interactions between Abeta-peptides and membrane lipids in Alzheimer's disease. To gain insight into the potential role of the free amino group of the N-terminus of Abeta29 ... [more ▼]

Increasing evidence implicates interactions between Abeta-peptides and membrane lipids in Alzheimer's disease. To gain insight into the potential role of the free amino group of the N-terminus of Abeta29-42 fragment in these processes, we have investigated the ability of Abeta29-42 unprotected and Abeta29-42 N-protected to interact with negatively-charged liposomes and have calculated the interaction with membrane lipids by conformational analysis. Using vesicles mimicking the composition of neuronal membranes, we show that both peptides have a similar capacity to induce membrane fusion and permeabilization. The fusogenic effect is related to the appearance of non-bilayer structures where isotropic motions occur as shown by 31P and 2H NMR studies. The molecular modeling calculations confirm the experimental observations and suggest that lipid destabilization could be due to the ability of both peptides to adopt metastable positions in the presence of lipids. In conclusion, the presence of a free or protected (acetylated) amino group in the N-terminus of Abeta29-42 is therefore probably not crucial for destabilizing properties of the C-terminal fragment of Abeta peptides. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental And Conformational Analyses Of Interactions Between Butenafine And Lipids
Mingeot-Leclercq, Mp.; Gallet, X.; Flore, Christelle ULg et al

in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2001), 45(12), 3347-54

Butenafine (N-4-tert-butylbenzyl-N-methyl-1-naphtalenemethylamine hydrochloride) is an antifungal agent of the benzylamine class that has excellent therapeutic efficacy and a remarkably long duration of ... [more ▼]

Butenafine (N-4-tert-butylbenzyl-N-methyl-1-naphtalenemethylamine hydrochloride) is an antifungal agent of the benzylamine class that has excellent therapeutic efficacy and a remarkably long duration of action when applied topically to treat various mycoses. Given the lipophilic nature of the molecule, efficacy may be related to an interaction with cell membrane phospholipids and permeabilization of the fungal cell wall. Similarly, high lipophilicity could account for the long duration of action, since fixation to lipids in cutaneous tissues might allow them to act as local depots for slow release of the drug. We have therefore used computer-assisted conformational analysis to investigate the interaction of butenafine with lipids and extended these observations with experimental studies in vitro using liposomes. Conformational analysis of mixed monolayers of phospholipids with the neutral and protonated forms of butenafine highlighted a possible interaction with both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains of membrane phospholipids. Studies using liposomes demonstrated that butenafine increases membrane fluidity [assessed by fluorescence polarization of 1-(4-trimethylammonium-phenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and 1,6-diphenylhexatriene] and membrane permeability (studied by release of calcein from liposomes). The results show, therefore, that butenafine readily interacts with lipids and is incorporated into membrane phospholipids. These findings may help explain the excellent antifungal efficacy and long duration of action of this drug when it is used as a topical antifungal agent in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailLysosomal phospholipases inhibition by emetine, strychnopentamine and usambarensine
Quetin-Leclercq, Joelle; Schomer, G; Van Bambeke, F et al

Poster (1999)

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See detailInteractions Of Macrolide Antibiotics (Erythromycin A, Roxithromycin, Erythromycylamine [Dirithromycin], And Azithromycin) With Phospholipids: Computer-Aided Conformational Analysis And Studies On Acellular And Cell Culture Models
Montenez, Jp.; Van Bambeke, F.; Piret, J. et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1999), 156(2), 129-40

The potential of 14/15 membered macrolides to cause phospholipidosis has been prospectively assessed, and structure-effects examined, using combined experimental and conformational approaches. Biochemical ... [more ▼]

The potential of 14/15 membered macrolides to cause phospholipidosis has been prospectively assessed, and structure-effects examined, using combined experimental and conformational approaches. Biochemical studies demonstrated drug binding to phosphatidylinositol-containing liposomes and inhibition of the activity of lysosomal phospholipase A1 toward phosphatidylcholine included in the bilayer, in close correlation with the number of cationic groups carried by the drugs (erythromycin A </= roxithromycin < erythromycylamine </= azithromycin). In cultured cells (fibroblasts), phospholipidosis (affecting all major phospholipids except sphingomyelin) was observed after 3 days with the following ranking: erythromycin A </= roxithromycin < erythromycylamine < azithromycin (roxithromycin could, however, not be studied in detail due to intrinsic toxicity). The difference between erythromycylamine and azithromycin was accounted for by the lower cellular accumulation of erythromycylamine. In parallel, based on a methodology developed and validated to study drug-membrane interactions, the conformational analyses revealed that erythromycin A, roxithromycin, erythromycylamine, and azithromycin penetrate into the hydrophobic domain of a phosphatidylinositol monolayer through their desosamine and cladinose moieties, whereas their macrocycle is found close to the interface. This position allows the aminogroups carried by the macrocycle of the diaminated macrolides (erythromycylamine and azithromycin) to come into close contact with the negatively charged phosphogroup of phosphatidylinositol, whereas the amine located on the C-3 of the desosamine, common to all four drugs, is located at a greater distance from this phosphogroup. Our study suggests that all macrolides have the potential to cause phospholipidosis but that this effect is modulated by toxicodynamic and toxicokinetic parameters related to the drug structure and mainly to their cationic character. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular description of the interactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics with negatively-charged phospholipids. Theoretical molecular modelling and experimental results.
Mingeot-Leclercq, M. P.; Schanck, A.; Van Bambeke, F. et al

in Pharmacology (1995), 14

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