References of "Van Assche, Gert"
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See detailGenetic association and functional role of Crohn disease risk alleles involved in microbial sensing, autophagy, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.
Hoefkens, Eveline; Nys, Kris; John, Jestinah M. et al

in Autophagy (2013), 9(12), 2046-55

Genome-wide association studies have identified several genes implicated in autophagy (ATG16L1, IRGM, ULK1, LRRK2, and MTMR3), intracellular bacterial sensing (NOD2), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress ... [more ▼]

Genome-wide association studies have identified several genes implicated in autophagy (ATG16L1, IRGM, ULK1, LRRK2, and MTMR3), intracellular bacterial sensing (NOD2), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (XBP1 and ORMDL3) to be associated with Crohn disease (CD). We studied the known CD-associated variants in these genes in a large cohort of 3451 individuals (1744 CD patients, 793 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and 914 healthy controls). We also investigated the functional phenotype linked to these genetic variants. Association with CD was confirmed for NOD2, ATG16L1, IRGM, MTMR3, and ORMDL3. The risk for developing CD increased with an increasing number of risk alleles for these genes (P<0.001, OR 1.26 [1.20 to 1.32]). Three times as many (34.8%) CD patients carried a risk allele in all three pathways, in contrast to 13.3% of the controls (P<0.0001, OR = 3.46 [2.77 to 4.32]). For UC, no significant association for one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found, but the risk for development of UC increased with an increasing total number of risk alleles (P = 0.001, OR = 1.10 [1.04 to 1.17]). We found a genetic interaction between reference SNP (rs)2241880 (ATG16L1) and rs10065172 (IRGM) in CD. Functional experiments hinted toward an association between an increased genetic risk and an augmented inflammatory status, highlighting the relevance of the genetic findings. [less ▲]

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See detailUnique gene expression and MR T2 relaxometry patterns define chronic murine dextran sodium sulphate colitis as a model for connective tissue changes in human Crohn's disease.
Breynaert, Christine; Dresselaers, Tom; Perrier, Clementine et al

in PloS one (2013), 8(7), 68876

INTRODUCTION: Chronically relapsing inflammation, tissue remodeling and fibrosis are hallmarks of inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in connective tissue in a ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Chronically relapsing inflammation, tissue remodeling and fibrosis are hallmarks of inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in connective tissue in a chronic murine model resulting from repeated cycles of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) ingestion, to mimic the relapsing nature of the human disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DSS in drinking water for 1 week, followed by a recovery phase of 2 weeks. This cycle of exposure was repeated for up to 3 times (9 weeks in total). Colonic inflammation, fibrosis, extracellular matrix proteins and colonic gene expression were studied. In vivo MRI T 2 relaxometry was studied as a potential non-invasive imaging tool to evaluate bowel wall inflammation and fibrosis. RESULTS: Repeated cycles of DSS resulted in a relapsing and remitting disease course, which induced a chronic segmental, transmural colitis after 2 and 3 cycles of DSS with clear induction of fibrosis and remodeling of the muscular layer. Tenascin expression mirrored its expression in Crohn's colitis. Microarray data identified a gene expression profile different in chronic colitis from that in acute colitis. Additional recovery was associated with upregulation of unique genes, in particular keratins, pointing to activation of molecular pathways for healing and repair. In vivo MRI T2 relaxometry of the colon showed a clear shift towards higher T2 values in the acute stage and a gradual regression of T2 values with increasing cycles of DSS. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated cycles of DSS exposure induce fibrosis and connective tissue changes with typical features, as occurring in Crohn's disease. Colonic gene expression analysis revealed unique expression profiles in chronic colitis compared to acute colitis and after additional recovery, pointing to potential new targets to intervene with the induction of fibrosis. In vivo T2 relaxometry is a promising non-invasive assessment of inflammation and fibrosis. [less ▲]

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See detailAdalimumab dose escalation and dose de-escalation success rate and predictors in a large national cohort of Crohn's patients.
Baert, Filip; Glorieus, Elien; Reenaers, Catherine et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis (2013), 7(2),

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Adalimumab is efficacious in inducing and maintaining remission in Crohn's disease but dose escalation is needed in 30-40% after 1year. Attempts for dose de-escalation have not been ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Adalimumab is efficacious in inducing and maintaining remission in Crohn's disease but dose escalation is needed in 30-40% after 1year. Attempts for dose de-escalation have not been studied. This study aimed to assess the need for, predictors, and outcome of dose escalation and de-escalation in a large cohort of adalimumab treated Crohn's patients. METHODS: All consecutive patients treated with open label adalimumab for active Crohn's disease from the participating centres were included in this cohort study. A detailed retrospective chart review was performed to look for possible factors predicting outcome. RESULTS: Eighty four percent of 720 patients had a primary response and were followed up for a median of 14months. Thirty four percent needed escalation after a median of 7months (0-55months). Multivariate predictors for dose escalation were the following: prior anti-TNF use (p<0.0001), no concomitant azathioprine or <3m (p<0.02) and abnormal CRP at start (p<0.05). Dose escalation re-induced response for at least 6months in 67%. Only abnormal CRP at start correlated with failure of dose escalation (p=0.02). Dose de-escalation was attempted in 54% and was successful in 63%. After a median follow-up of 14m adalimumab was discontinued in 29% of patients. CONCLUSION: In this study real life nationwide cohort of Crohn's patients treated with adalimumab dose escalation was needed in 34% and was successful in 67%. Dose de-escalation was attempted in 54% and was successful in 63%. Overall 71% of patients maintained long term response on adalimumab. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of infliximab therapy on transmural lesions as assessed by magnetic resonance enteroclysis in patients with ileal Crohn's disease.
Van Assche, Gert; Herrmann, Karin A.; Louis, Edouard ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn's & colitis (2013), 7(12), 950-7

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Anti TNF therapy induces mucosal healing in patients with Crohn's disease, but the effects on transmural inflammation in the ileum are not well understood. Magnetic resonance ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Anti TNF therapy induces mucosal healing in patients with Crohn's disease, but the effects on transmural inflammation in the ileum are not well understood. Magnetic resonance-enteroclysis (MRE) offers excellent imaging of transmural and peri-enteric lesions in Crohn's ileitis and we aimed to study its responsiveness to anti TNF therapy. METHODS: In this multi-center prospective trial, anti TNF naive patients with ileal Crohn's disease and with increased CRP and contrast enhanced wall thickening received infliximab 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2 and 6, and q8 weeks maintenance MRE was performed at baseline, 2 weeks and 6 months and assessed based on a predefined MRE score of severity in ileal Crohn's Disease. RESULTS: Twenty patients were included; of those, 18 patients underwent MRE at week 2 and 15 patients at weeks 2 and 26 as scheduled. Inflammatory components of the MRE index decreased by >/=2 points and by >/=50% at week 26 (primary endpoint) in 40% and 32% of patients (per protocol and intention to treat analysis, respectively). The MRE index improved in 44% at week 2 and in 80% at week 26. Complete absence of inflammatory lesions was observed in 0/18 at week 2 and 13% (2/15) at week 26. The obstructive elements did not change. Clinical and CRP improvement occurred as early as wk 2, but only CDAI correlated with the MRE index. CONCLUSION: Improvement of MRE occurs from 2 weeks after infliximab therapy onwards and correlates with clinical response but normalization of MRE is rare. [less ▲]

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See detailVedolizumab as induction and maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis.
Feagan, Brian G.; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sands, Bruce E. et al

in The New England journal of medicine (2013), 369(8), 699-710

BACKGROUND: Gut-selective blockade of lymphocyte trafficking by vedolizumab may constitute effective treatment for ulcerative colitis. METHODS: We conducted two integrated randomized, double-blind ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Gut-selective blockade of lymphocyte trafficking by vedolizumab may constitute effective treatment for ulcerative colitis. METHODS: We conducted two integrated randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of vedolizumab in patients with active disease. In the trial of induction therapy, 374 patients (cohort 1) received vedolizumab (at a dose of 300 mg) or placebo intravenously at weeks 0 and 2, and 521 patients (cohort 2) received open-label vedolizumab at weeks 0 and 2, with disease evaluation at week 6. In the trial of maintenance therapy, patients in either cohort who had a response to vedolizumab at week 6 were randomly assigned to continue receiving vedolizumab every 8 or 4 weeks or to switch to placebo for up to 52 weeks. A response was defined as a reduction in the Mayo Clinic score (range, 0 to 12, with higher scores indicating more active disease) of at least 3 points and a decrease of at least 30% from baseline, with an accompanying decrease in the rectal bleeding subscore of at least 1 point or an absolute rectal bleeding subscore of 0 or 1. RESULTS: Response rates at week 6 were 47.1% and 25.5% among patients in the vedolizumab group and placebo group, respectively (difference with adjustment for stratification factors, 21.7 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11.6 to 31.7; P<0.001). At week 52, 41.8% of patients who continued to receive vedolizumab every 8 weeks and 44.8% of patients who continued to receive vedolizumab every 4 weeks were in clinical remission (Mayo Clinic score </=2 and no subscore >1), as compared with 15.9% of patients who switched to placebo (adjusted difference, 26.1 percentage points for vedolizumab every 8 weeks vs. placebo [95% CI, 14.9 to 37.2; P<0.001] and 29.1 percentage points for vedolizumab every 4 weeks vs. placebo [95% CI, 17.9 to 40.4; P<0.001]). The frequency of adverse events was similar in the vedolizumab and placebo groups. CONCLUSIONS: Vedolizumab was more effective than placebo as induction and maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis. (Funded by Millennium Pharmaceuticals; GEMINI 1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00783718.). [less ▲]

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See detailCancer risk in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID).
Beyaert, Rudi; Beaugerie, Laurent; Van Assche, Gert et al

in Molecular cancer (2013), 12(1), 98

Inflammation and cancer have a profound yet ambiguous relationship. Inflammation - especially chronic inflammation - has protumorigenic effects, but inflammatory cells also mediate an immune response ... [more ▼]

Inflammation and cancer have a profound yet ambiguous relationship. Inflammation - especially chronic inflammation - has protumorigenic effects, but inflammatory cells also mediate an immune response against the tumor and immunosuppression is known to increase the risk for certain tumors.This article reviews current literature on the role of inflammation in cancer and the cancer risk in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). We discuss the effect on cancer risk of different drug classes used in the treatment of IMIDs treatment, including biologicals such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors.Overall cancer incidence and mortality risk are similar to the general population in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and slightly increased for rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, with risk profiles differing for different tumor types. Increased risk for non-melanoma skin cancer is associated with thiopurine treatment in IBD, with the combination of anti-TNF and methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis and with PUVA, cyclosporine and anti-TNF treatment in psoriasis. Data on the safety of using biologic or immunosuppressant therapy in IMID patients with a history of cancer are scarce.This review provides clinicians with a solid background to help them in making decisions about treatment of immune-mediated diseases in patients with a tumor history.This article is related to another review article in Molecular Cancer: http://www.molecular-cancer.com/content/12/1/86. [less ▲]

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See detailPrognostic Value of Serologic and Histologic Markers on Clinical Relapse in Ulcerative Colitis Patients With Mucosal Healing
Bessissow, Talat; Lemmens, Bart; Ferrante, Marc et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2012), 11(107), 1684-92

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See detailMucosal gene expression of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after infliximab treatment.
Arijs, Ingrid; De Hertogh, Gert; Machiels, Kathleen et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2011), 106(4), 748-61

OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a continuous influx of leukocytes into the gut wall. This migration is regulated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and selective ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a continuous influx of leukocytes into the gut wall. This migration is regulated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and selective antimigration therapies have been developed. This study investigated the effect of infliximab therapy on the mucosal gene expression of CAMs in IBD. METHODS: Mucosal gene expression of 69 leukocyte/endothelial CAMs and E-cadherin was investigated in 61 IBD patients before and after first infliximab infusion and in 12 normal controls, using Affymetrix gene expression microarrays. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and western blotting were used to confirm the microarray data. RESULTS: When compared with control colons, the colonic mucosal gene expression of most leukocyte/endothelial adhesion molecules was upregulated and E-cadherin gene expression was downregulated in active colonic IBD (IBDc) before therapy, with no significant colonic gene expression differences between ulcerative colitis and colonic Crohn's disease. Infliximab therapy restored the upregulations of leukocyte CAMs in IBDc responders to infliximab that paralleled the disappearance of the inflammatory cells from the colonic lamina propria. Also, the colonic gene expression of endothelial CAMs and of most chemokines/chemokine receptors returned to normal after therapy in IBDc responders, and only CCL20 and CXCL1-2 expression remained increased after therapy in IBDc responders vs. control colons. When compared with control ileums, the ileal gene expression of MADCAM1, THY1, PECAM1, CCL28, CXCL1, -2, -5, -6, and -11, and IL8 was increased and CD58 expression was decreased in active ileal Crohn's disease (CDi) before therapy, and none of the genes remained dysregulated after therapy in CDi responders vs. control ileums. This microarray study identified a number of interesting targets for antiadhesion therapy including PECAM1, IL8, and CCL20, besides the currently studied alpha4beta7 integrin-MADCAM1 axis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that many leukocyte/endothelial CAMs and chemokines/chemokine receptors are upregulated in inflamed IBD mucosa. Controlling the inflammation with infliximab restores most of these dysregulations in IBD. These results show that at least part of the mechanism of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy goes through downregulation of certain adhesion molecules. [less ▲]

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See detailMucosal gene expression of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after infliximab treatment.
Arijs, Ingrid; De Hertogh, Gert; Machiels, Kathleen et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2011)

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See detailOutcome of pregnancy in women with inflammatory bowel disease treated with antitumor necrosis factor therapy.
Schnitzler, François ULg; Fidder, Herma; Boukerroucha, Meriem ULg et al

in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (2011), 17(9), 1846-1854

BACKGROUND:: Infliximab (IFX) and adalimumab (ADA) are attractive treatment options in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) also during pregnancy but there is still limited data on the benefit ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND:: Infliximab (IFX) and adalimumab (ADA) are attractive treatment options in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) also during pregnancy but there is still limited data on the benefit/risk profile of IFX and ADA during pregnancy. METHODS:: This observational study assessed pregnancy outcomes in 212 women with IBD under antitumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) treatment at our IBD unit. Pregnancy outcomes in 42 pregnancies with direct exposure to anti-TNF treatment (35 IFX, 7 ADA) were compared with that in 23 pregnancies prior to IBD diagnosis, 78 pregnancies before start of IFX, 53 pregnancies with indirect exposure to IFX, and 56 matched pregnancies in healthy women. RESULTS:: Thirty-two of the 42 pregnancies ended in live births with a median gestational age of 38 weeks (interquartile range [IQR] 37-39). There were seven premature deliveries, six children had low birth weight, and there was one stillbirth. One boy weighed 1640 g delivered at week 33, died at age of 13 days because of necrotizing enterocolitis. A total of eight abortions (one patient wish) occurred in seven women. Trisomy 18 was diagnosed in one fetus of a mother with CD at age 37 under ADA treatment (40 mg weekly) and pregnancy was terminated. Pregnancy outcomes after direct exposure to anti-TNF treatment were not different from those in pregnancies before anti-TNF treatment or with indirect exposure to anti-TNF treatment but outcomes were worse than in pregnancies before IBD diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS:: Direct exposure to anti-TNF treatment during pregnancy was not related to a higher incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes than IBD overall. (Inflamm Bowel Dis 2011;). [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of the Crohn's disease digestive damage score, the Lemann score.
Pariente, Benjamin; Cosnes, Jacques; Danese, Silvio et al

in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (2011), 17(6), 1415-22

Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic progressive destructive disease. Currently available instruments measure disease activity at a specific point in time. An instrument to measure cumulative structural ... [more ▼]

Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic progressive destructive disease. Currently available instruments measure disease activity at a specific point in time. An instrument to measure cumulative structural damage to the bowel, which may predict long-term disability, is needed. The aim of this article is to outline the methods to develop an instrument that can measure cumulative bowel damage. The project is being conducted by the International Program to develop New Indexes in Crohn's disease (IPNIC) group. This instrument, called the Crohn's Disease Digestive Damage Score (the Lemann score), should take into account damage location, severity, extent, progression, and reversibility, as measured by diagnostic imaging modalities and the history of surgical resection. It should not be "diagnostic modality driven": for each lesion and location, a modality appropriate for the anatomic site (for example: computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging enterography, and colonoscopy) will be used. A total of 24 centers from 15 countries will be involved in a cross-sectional study, which will include up to 240 patients with stratification according to disease location and duration. At least 120 additional patients will be included in the study to validate the score. The Lemann score is expected to be able to portray a patient's disease course on a double-axis graph, with time as the x-axis, bowel damage severity as the y-axis, and the slope of the line connecting data points as a measure of disease progression. This instrument could be used to assess the effect of various medical therapies on the progression of bowel damage. [less ▲]

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See detailTolerability of shortened infliximab infusion times in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: a single-center cohort study.
Breynaert, Christine; Ferrante, Marc; Fidder, Herma et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2011), 106(4), 778-85

OBJECTIVES: Scheduled maintenance therapy with infliximab decreases the risk of infusion reactions. Many centers have accelerated infusion times to 1 h in selected patients who tolerate 5 mg/kg infliximab ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Scheduled maintenance therapy with infliximab decreases the risk of infusion reactions. Many centers have accelerated infusion times to 1 h in selected patients who tolerate 5 mg/kg infliximab infusions. The aim of this study was to compare the tolerability of 1-h and 2-h infliximab infusions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a large single-center cohort. The primary end point was the incidence of infusion reactions in both groups. METHODS: A retrospective chart analysis of all IBD patients treated with infliximab was performed. Infusions in scheduled maintenance for at least 6 months from December 1994 until March 2009 were included. All patients were treated at the infusion unit or during hospitalization under standard operating procedures. Infusion parameters were prospectively recorded. From 2004, in patients tolerating at least four 2-h infusions, infusions were given over 1 h. RESULTS: As of March 2009, 953 patients with IBD (77.6% Crohn's disease, 22.4% ulcerative colitis) had been treated with infliximab. A total of 474 patients met the criteria of scheduled maintenance therapy. In total, 9,155 maintenance infusions were administered (4,307 over 1 h). No severe infusion reactions were documented. Mild acute reactions occurred in 0.6% (27/4,307) of the 1-h-infusion group and in 1.7% (80/4848) of the 2-h infusion group (P=0.0034). Delayed infusion reactions occurred in 0.2% of 1-h and 0.5% of 2-h infusion group patients (P=0.277). Loss of tolerability due to infusion reactions (1-h group 2.9% versus 2-h group 4.1%) was evenly distributed (P=0.34). None of the prespecified variables were predictive of infusion reactions in a multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with IBD tolerating 2-h infusions of infliximab scheduled maintenance therapy, the infusion time can be shortened to 1 h with good tolerability. No severe reactions were observed and no predictors of infusion reactions were identified. [less ▲]

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See detailLevels of C-reactive protein are associated with response to infliximab therapy in patients with Crohn's disease.
Jurgens, Matthias; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg; Cleynen, Isabelle et al

in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of The American Gastroenterological Association (2011), 9(5), 421-71

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Infliximab is an antibody against tumor necrosis factor-alpha that is used to treat patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease (CD). C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker used to ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Infliximab is an antibody against tumor necrosis factor-alpha that is used to treat patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease (CD). C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker used to identify and follow individuals with CD. We analyzed changes in levels of CRP in a large cohort of patients with CD undergoing treatment with infliximab. METHODS: Serial levels of CRP were analyzed in 718 CD patients. Blood was collected before each infusion; a total of 8845 CRP levels were available for analysis. The correlations between CRP levels and need for dose adjustment, outcomes, and mucosal healing (based on endoscopic analysis of 253 patients) were evaluated. Therapy adjustment was considered successful if therapy continued without need for change. Subgroup analysis was performed by using data from 268 patients who received 8 weeks of maintenance therapy. RESULTS: More patients with high baseline levels of CRP responded to infliximab than patients with normal levels (90.8% vs 82.6%; P = .014). Early normalization of CRP levels correlated with sustained long-term response (P < .001). CRP levels remained significantly higher among patients who lost their response to infliximab, compared with those with a sustained response (P = .001). At time of loss of response, CRP levels were significantly increased (median, 11.2 mg/L) and did not return to baseline levels (median, 18.2 mg/L; P = .039). CRP correlated with mucosal healing (P = .033). CONCLUSIONS: CRP is a good marker of disease activity in patients treated with infliximab. Increased levels of CRP indicate mucosal inflammation and a likelihood of clinical relapse. [less ▲]

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See detailPredictive value of epithelial gene expression profiles for response to infliximab in Crohn’s disease
Arijs, Ingrid; Quintens, Roel; Van Lommel, Leentje et al

in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (2010), 16(12), 2090-2098

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See detailIntestinal mucosal gene expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after first infliximab treatment.
Arijs, Ingrid; Quintens, Roel; Lemaire, Katleen et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2010)

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See detailThe second European evidence-based Consensus on the diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease: Definitions and diagnosis.
Van Assche, Gert; Dignass, Axel; Panes, Julian et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2010), 4(1), 7-27

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See detailReport of the ECCO pathogenesis workshop on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases: definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects.
Allez, Matthieu; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Louis, Edouard ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2010), 4(4), 355-66

The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of ... [more ▼]

The first ECCO pathogenesis workshop focused on anti-TNF therapy failures in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). The overall objective was to better understand and explore primary non response and loss of response to anti-TNF agents in IBD. The outcome of this workshop is presented into two parts. This first section addresses definitions, frequency and pharmacological aspects of anti-TNF therapy failure, including pharmacokinetics of anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies and immune and non-immune mediated clearance of anti-TNF mAbs. The second section concerns the biological roles of TNF and TNF antagonists, including mechanisms of action of anti-TNF agents, and discuss hypothesis regarding their failures and phenomenon of paradoxical inflammation, including the potential role of TNF independent inflammatory pathways. [less ▲]

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See detailIntestinal mucosal gene expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and the impact of infliximab therapy.
Arijs, Ingrid; Quintens, Roel; Lemaire, Katleen et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2010)

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See detailIntravenous iron therapy restores functional iron deficiency induced by infliximab
Katsanos, Konstantinos; Cavalier, Etienne ULg; Ferrante, Marc et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2007), 1

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See detailGene expression profiling to predict the response of infliximab in patients with UC
Arijs, Ingrid; Van lommel, Leertje; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Gastroenterology (2007), 132(4), 174-174

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