References of "Van Oudheusden, Michiel"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailWhat’s with the hyphens? A social studies perspective on science-technology-society
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg

Scientific conference (2016, September 13)

This presentation highlights the roles social scientists (notably in the field of science and technology studies) can/should play in nuclear research and development. Three cases are briefly described and ... [more ▼]

This presentation highlights the roles social scientists (notably in the field of science and technology studies) can/should play in nuclear research and development. Three cases are briefly described and assessed: citizen science after Fukushima, incident reporting at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, and the "microbiologization" of radioactive waste management. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrating Science and Technology into Sports: A Case Study of Sports Innovations in Belgium
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

Conference (2016, September 01)

This paper explores the dynamic interplay between sports and innovation policies, research and development processes, and science-driven sports practices in Wallonia and Flanders (Belgium). Here, as in ... [more ▼]

This paper explores the dynamic interplay between sports and innovation policies, research and development processes, and science-driven sports practices in Wallonia and Flanders (Belgium). Here, as in other countries and regions, the aim of integrating science and technology into sports is now a leading sports policy principle and innovation strategy. Building on science and technology studies (STS) tools and methods (vision assessment, multi-site ethnography, foresight), the paper draws out the ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) induced by the use of new sciences and technologies in sports. These ELSI include the client-centered nature of sports science, which raises concerns about occupational control and athlete welfare, the uptake of genetic data in sports talent detection programs, and the challenges of coordinating "data-driven" and "intuitive" sports training approaches. It is argued that as sports are scientized and technologized, such ELSI demand to be addressed by sports innovators, governing bodies, and publics. By drawing critical attention to how sports are increasingly shaped by devices, data flows, and scientists, the paper states the case for bringing sports into STS and STS into sports. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCitizen science in the nuclear field: An exploration of its potential in governing nuclear incidents, accidents, and post-disaster situations
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Turcanu, Catrinel; Van Hoyweghen, Ine et al

Conference (2016, June 28)

Citizen science (CS) is a form of science developed and enacted by citizens, typically with citizen volunteers collecting and/or analyzing various kinds of data. As CS serves public purposes (e.g ... [more ▼]

Citizen science (CS) is a form of science developed and enacted by citizens, typically with citizen volunteers collecting and/or analyzing various kinds of data. As CS serves public purposes (e.g. educational goals) and emanates within democratic and participatory cultures (e.g. the open science movement), it potentially broadens scientific research and facilitates public participation in science policy. Whereas the role of CS is well documented in fields such as amateur astronomy, biohacking, video gaming, etc., there is a dearth of research about the role of CS in the nuclear field. Yet, following the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, CS has demonstrably contributed to filling knowledge and information gaps, as citizens in the affected areas monitor radioactivity in the environment and communicate about environmental risks (e.g. Citizens’ Radioactivity Monitoring Project). In this process, citizen scientists have voiced ardent criticism of government and industry, as these institutes are seen to deliberately inhibit open knowledge sharing. Taking these insights as an entry point, this paper probes the potential of CS in the governance of nuclear incidents/accidents, emergency situations, and in post-disaster recovery. Drawing on past and present CS initiatives connected to nuclear incidents and accidents in Japan, the USA, Canada, and the UK, it conceptualizes the social spaces in which CS emerges; ascertains which knowledge, information and decision-making challenges CS addresses; and determines which collective lessons can be drawn to ensure more legitimate and socially robust nuclear governance. Particular attention is given to the role governments, industries, and established scientists can, and should, assume as potential facilitators, patrons, or challengers of a more collective, open approach to disaster preparedness and response. The latter category comprises social scientists, who in Japan have been criticized for “disengaging” with CS practice, thereby limiting opportunities for contextual learning about disasters and even hampering post-trauma disaster recovery. The paper engages with the following conference themes: The future role of publics in processes of government/governance; Empowering publics in new innovation processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
See detailVolunteering Citizens in Nuclear Risk Governance: Citizen Science after Fukushima
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Turcanu, Catrinel; Yoshizawa, Go et al

Conference (2016, April 20)

Citizen science (CS) is a form of science developed and enacted by citizens, typically with citizen volunteers collecting and/or analyzing various kinds of data. Whereas common forms of CS like bird ... [more ▼]

Citizen science (CS) is a form of science developed and enacted by citizens, typically with citizen volunteers collecting and/or analyzing various kinds of data. Whereas common forms of CS like bird counting and amateur astronomy generally elicit interest and approval on behalf of scientists, decision makers, and publics at large, CS in the nuclear field is far more contentious. This is due to the controversial nature of nuclear science and technology, as evidenced by public disputes about nuclear energy, nuclear waste management, and nuclear accidents, among others. Starting from these observations, this paper probes the risky, disputed character of CS in nuclear emergency and post-accident situations. It specifically looks at CS in Japan after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, where citizens in affected areas monitor radioactivity in the environment and communicate about health and environmental risks with one another (e.g. Citizens’ Radioactivity Monitoring Project). In these processes, citizen scientists voice ardent criticism of government, industry, and academia, as these institutes are seen to deliberately spread biased information to sustain an illusion of control (http://blog.safecast.org). By taking science and technology into their own hands, they challenge conventional notions of citizen engagement, science, and avocation/volunteerism. The paper draws on the notions of contentious politics and issue politics (e.g. Marres 2005) to highlight the issue-driven, adversarial and untamed character of post-Fukushima CS in the nuclear field. It is argued that these notions better capture what CS after Fukushima amounts to, as conventional representations (e.g. volunteer sensing, “citizens as sensors,” public participation in scientific research) downplay scientific uncertainties and power asymmetries between citizens and authorities, and do not account for how “Fukushima” is reconfiguring scientific citizenship in novel ways. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Bullshit Abstract: From Critique to Reflexive Practice
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Charlier, Nathan ULg; Claisse, Frédéric ULg

Conference (2016, March 17)

Academics use the abstract to summarize and communicate a research paper’s focus, methods, findings, and conclusions. However, not all abstracts are convincing. Many are bland, uninspired, or outright ... [more ▼]

Academics use the abstract to summarize and communicate a research paper’s focus, methods, findings, and conclusions. However, not all abstracts are convincing. Many are bland, uninspired, or outright stupid, as authors do not always know what they want to say or how to communicate complex research in the space of a few hundred words. They hence often convey the kind of “intelligent stupidity,” which Robert Musil (1937) said could hardly be “distinguished from talent, progress, hope or improvement.” By implication, abstracts are prone to contain and perpetuate “academic bullshit” (Frankfurt 2005), broadly understood as forms of academic expression that meet the stylistic academic standards but generate content that is deceptive, doubtful, or irrelevant. Taking this inherent disposition towards bullshit in the academic abstract as its entry point, this paper presents ten self-authored “bullshit abstracts,” which draw inspiration from various academic fields. Far from denouncing bullshit outright, it acknowledges the inevitable character of bullshit in academic writing (Eubanks and Schaeffer 2008). It urges academics to reflexively consider, and perform, their roles as researchers and writers in view of the challenges they face today, such as reputation management and the pressure in academia to publish or perish; and their complete lack of sensitivity to the odorous aspects of writing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (3 ULg)
See detailGetting on Board but How? Conflicting Perspectives on the Role of the Social Sciences and Humanities in Radiation Protection
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Rossignol, Nicolas ULg; Perko, Tanja et al

Conference (2016, March 14)

In Europe, science research policy is predicated on the understanding that science and technology (S&T) serve societal needs. Accordingly, European Framework Programs urge scientists and technologists to ... [more ▼]

In Europe, science research policy is predicated on the understanding that science and technology (S&T) serve societal needs. Accordingly, European Framework Programs urge scientists and technologists to give due attention to societal and ethical aspects of S&T, and to engage with social scientists and humanists when doing research and reaching out to society. Starting from these policy prescriptions and from invitations from befriended life scientists to "get on board," we explore the terms of our involvement as social scientists and humanists in a European Joint Program on radiation protection research (EJP-CONCERT). We illuminate recurring tensions between instrumental, normative, and substantive perspectives on the role of the social sciences and humanities (SSH) in radioprotection research and nuclear S&T. Our aim is to shed light on the controversial and contingent nature of integrating SSH into nuclear S&T, as actors articulate divergent assumptions and expectations about SSH and society. These expectations pertain to the value of SSH research for S&T, issues of trust and legitmacy, and different perspectives on risk and uncertainty. By rendering these tensions explicit we seek to probe the implications for SSH of developing a separate SSH Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) within radiation protection research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (3 ULg)
See detailScience, technology and society: opening pathways for integrating social sciences and humanities into nuclear research
Turcanu, Catrinel; Meskens, Gaston; Perko, Tanja et al

Poster (2016, February 11)

The PISA programme was initiated in 1999 within the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN to study the societal, political, cultural and ethical aspects of the development and use of nuclear technology ... [more ▼]

The PISA programme was initiated in 1999 within the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN to study the societal, political, cultural and ethical aspects of the development and use of nuclear technology and applications of ionising radiation. The programme was launched as the result of an internal reflection acknowledging that insights from social sciences and humanities were required to better explore normative concepts such as precaution and sustainable development, and to understand attitudes towards nuclear technologies and its governance. This presentation elaborates on the objectives of PISA and its main research tracks. It shows that through its multi-disciplinary approach, the PISA programme of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN opens pathways towards such integration, and thus contributes to rendering nuclear research more reflective and more responsive towards society. It explicates the interactions between science, technology and society, in general, and the complexity of nuclear technology assessment, in particular. Last, but not least, due do its reflexive character, PISA research creates an epistemologically and socially enriching dynamic in the organisation itself. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (3 ULg)
See detailNew ventures in nuclear emergency planning and response: a governance perspective
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Rossignol, Nicolas ULg; Turcanu, Catrinel

Poster (2016, February 11)

Emergency and disaster management is structured by the complex interaction of natural, social, and technological factors, and contingent on features of culture and organization. Our research serves to ... [more ▼]

Emergency and disaster management is structured by the complex interaction of natural, social, and technological factors, and contingent on features of culture and organization. Our research serves to highlight how these features come into play and shape emergency planning, anticipation, and response. Based on qualitative and quantitative analyses, we devise more resilient, responsive, and adaptive emergency policies for implicated stakeholders (e.g. policymakers, emergency services, regulators) and society at large. Our research foci include citizen science initiatives and stakeholder forums on contaminated goods in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima accident. Our methods are grounded in vulnerability analysis, which accepts that vulnerability is an inherent trait of contemporary societies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCitizen Science in Vlaanderen: U telt mee?!
Hens, Niel; Huyse, Tine; Samaey, Giovanni et al

Article for general public (2016)

This position paper seeks to raise further awareness of the topic of Citizen Science (CS) amongst researchers and broader publics in Flanders. The memorandum clarifies the concept of CS and situates it ... [more ▼]

This position paper seeks to raise further awareness of the topic of Citizen Science (CS) amongst researchers and broader publics in Flanders. The memorandum clarifies the concept of CS and situates it within its historical and contemporary contexts. It also reflects on the potential for involving the broader community in science, while providing examples of situations and areas in which involvement of this kind is already taking place in Flanders. Based on a survey that questioned Flemish researchers on CS, the memorandum contains four recommendations for the governing bodies of universities, academic stakeholders and scientists and scholars specifically. Finally, this position paper offers a series of tips and tricks, along with testimonies for researches who would like to start working in the CS field. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSafety in Long Term Radioactive Waste Management: Insight and Oversight
Schröder, Jantine; Rossignol, Nicolas ULg; Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg

in Safety Science (2016), 85

High-level, long-lived radioactive waste remains hazardous for periods that go well beyond our human conception of time (many thousands of years). Because active safety measures are considered unreliable ... [more ▼]

High-level, long-lived radioactive waste remains hazardous for periods that go well beyond our human conception of time (many thousands of years). Because active safety measures are considered unreliable, unjustifiable and simply impossible over such long time spans, experts worldwide recommend geological disposal as the preferred strategy for long-term radioactive waste management, to a large extent due to its promise of delivering ‘passive safety’. Passive safety refers to the repository being safe ‘by itself’, i.e. unmediated by human actors and actions. Safety is thus approached technically and delineated as an intrinsic property of the disposal system. As such, the notion of 'passive safety' entails a system simplification that allows for approaching safety in a more calculable and predictable manner than would be the case for 'active safety'. In this article, we describe and analyze the ambiguity of this seemingly straightforward approach to safety. Drawing on constructivist insights from safety science and science and technology studies, we propose a more integrated sociotechnical vision that transcends the active versus passive safety division. The notion of 'oversight', as it is currently starting to surface in international radioactive waste management discourses, will be used as a sensitizing concept, offering potential to elaborate such an integrated vision. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVan botscan tot bodysuit. Naar een maatschappelijk debat over sportinnovatie
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

in Karakter. Tijdschrift van wetenschap (2015), 52

Many scientists, athletes, sports bodies, and governments applaud the increasing integration of science and technology into sports. However, the scientization of sports raises ethical, legal, and social ... [more ▼]

Many scientists, athletes, sports bodies, and governments applaud the increasing integration of science and technology into sports. However, the scientization of sports raises ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI), e.g. about the changing relationship between medical support and human enhancement, and the implications of scientific talent screening in sports for sports participation. A public debate is needed that identifies the ELSI in sports innovation and urges technology innovators, regulators, and decision makers to take into account such issues before sports innovations are irrevocably locked into sports and society. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBroadening, Deepening, and Governing Innovation: Flemish Technology Assessment in Historical and Socio-Political Perspective
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Charlier, Nathan ULg; Rosskamp, Benedikt ULg et al

in Research Policy (2015), 44(10), 1877-1886

This article examines how science, technology, and innovation (STI) policies in Flanders (Belgium) are affected by, and potentially transformed through, technology assessments (TAs). Broadly defined, TAs ... [more ▼]

This article examines how science, technology, and innovation (STI) policies in Flanders (Belgium) are affected by, and potentially transformed through, technology assessments (TAs). Broadly defined, TAs encompass activities and programs that expand and deepen the knowledge base of contemporary knowledge-based economies (KBEs), typically by including new actors (e.g. trade unions), ideas (e.g. science in society), and rationales (e.g. participatory techniques) in STI processes. Starting from the regionalization of STI policy in Belgium and the convergence of Flemish STI around global KBE principles, the article exemplifies how since the 1980s successive Flemish TA waves (early- warning, bottom-up, and interactive TA) have co-evolved with successive generations of Flemish innovation policy. Building on these findings, it argues that Flemish TA has assumed the role of mediator between science and society, both by counteracting and accommodating dominant STI paradigms. By providing a historical and socio-political perspective on TA and innovation policy, the article draws critical attention to the institutional settings and societal contexts in which TA is embedded, and questions TA's strategic utility within contemporary KBEs. This perspective sheds light on the Flemish government's recent decision to close its parliamentary TA institute and the institutional expansion of TA elsewhere in Europe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (20 ULg)
See detailMediating science, technology, and society at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN through hybrid management: The case of PISA
Schröder, Jantine; Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Rossignol, Nicolas ULg et al

Conference (2015, October 16)

Despite growing recognition that the technical and social dimensions of technology development are coproduced, research and policymaking in the nuclear field is still predicated on the separation between ... [more ▼]

Despite growing recognition that the technical and social dimensions of technology development are coproduced, research and policymaking in the nuclear field is still predicated on the separation between both dimensions. This paper explores how this separation is enacted, and occasionally questioned and transformed, within the Belgian context of nuclear technology. It situates the emergence of a science policy support (SPS) unit and programme (PISA) within the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN as an institutional response to the need of integrating societal and ethical concerns into nuclear research. The paper elicits how since 1999, SPS/PISA draws together science and technology studies (STS) and technology assessment (TA) approaches, creating links between nuclear research innovation and society in mutually beneficial ways. To this end, it first outlines the four areas in which SPS/PISA researchers are active: 1. Ethics of nuclear technology assessment; 2. Radioactive waste management; 3. Safety governance; 4. Perception and communication of ionising radiation risks. As SPS/PISA research is situated in a trading zone that embeds scholarship, nuclear research and research policy, the paper illuminates the growing entanglement of the natural and social sciences, and the roles social scientists play in the development of contemporary technologies and technology policy. Drawing on the notion of hybrid management (Miller 2001), the paper argues that SPS/PISA researchers must develop a language that underlines the interdependency between science, policy, and politics, while acknowledging that actors (policymakers, industry representatives, natural and social scientists, citizens) recurrently draw distinctions between these domains as a means of collectively managing nuclear issues. SPS/PISA research is therefore best understood as boundary work that mediates between various interests, values, and "knowledges." The paper concludes by discussing the key challenges SPS/PISA researchers face while engaging in work of this kind: maintaining professional independence and credibility, ensuring research continuity, and generating both scientific and policy impacts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULg)
See detailDissensus, Unclosure, and Agonistic Appraisal: Reconceiving of Technology Assessment and Consensus Conferences as Forms of Social Experimentation
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg

Conference (2015, August 20)

In this paper, I inquire into two public deliberative formats that aim to render scientific and technological practices more socially robust: the consensus conference and participatory technology ... [more ▼]

In this paper, I inquire into two public deliberative formats that aim to render scientific and technological practices more socially robust: the consensus conference and participatory technology assessment (pTA). Drawing on experiences in the US National Institute of Health Consensus Conferences and in a Flemish pTA on nanotechnologies, I make explicit how these formats enact a strong appeal to consensus; thereby delegitimizing conflict and disagreement among deliberating parties. By perceiving of these formats as social experiments that typically elicit undecided procedures and tentative, “unclosed” outputs, it is possible to: (a) pinpoint how conflict pervades deliberative engagements in science and technology, and (b) revalue conflict dynamics as a useful heuristic that encourages (rather than hampers) the expression of disagreement. I argue that deliberately seeking out conflict in deliberation is both morally responsible and epsitemically fruitful, as it obliges participants to refine their worldviews in confrontation with competing truth claims and enables them to articulate their personal or group needs. To further develop these lines of reasoning, I propose three conceptions that contrast with the consensus ideal: dissensus, unclosure, and (ant)agonistic learning. I conclude by offering suggestions on how to build critical reflection about the ethical, political, and epistemic implications of social experimentation into processes of science and technology governance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
See detailCitizen Science and Democratic Citizenship
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg; Meyer, Morgan

Conference (2015, July 08)

Citizen science (CS) is now widely recognized as a scienti c research practice that engages "nonscientists," such as journalists, artists, hackers, and entrepreneurs. Examples of CS include amateur ... [more ▼]

Citizen science (CS) is now widely recognized as a scienti c research practice that engages "nonscientists," such as journalists, artists, hackers, and entrepreneurs. Examples of CS include amateur astronomy, biohacking, video gaming, and ornithology, among many others. As many of these practices serve public purposes (e.g. educational goals) and emanate within participatory cultures (e.g. the open science movement), CS can be inscribed in a politics of openness, transparency, and inclusion. These politics are potentially reinforced by the policy uptake of CS (e.g. EU White Paper on CS). Yet, despite its growing public significance and potential to render science more inclusive, CS embeds divergent, often conicting, assumptions about the means and ends of science and the role of the citizen/scientist in contemporary democracy. For instance, in its 'purest' form, CS emerges as a reaction against industry and institutional science, in so far as these institutes are seen to inhibit open knowledge sharing. On the other hand, CS sometimes links to commercial endeavors. CS should thus be approached as a multilayered practice that has the power to reshape existing policies, categories, and identities. Taking these reflections into consideration, this panel asks how CS (re)constructs the contemporary citizen, scientist, and citizen scientist. How are citizens transformed into active 'co-creators' of science? Which political rights do citizen scientists claim, as individuals or as groups? Which tools do citizen scientists mobilize to build communities around scientific endeavor? How local or global are the politics of CS? How do policymakers act as facilitators, patrons, or challengers of a more collective, open science? These questions demand critical attention, as CS is performative of democratic citizenship. The panel's questions resonate with the following conference themes: How are publics constructed by policies? To what extent are groups and identities shaped in the policymaking process? How do publics express themselves? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 ULg)
See detailTechnology Assessment in East Asia: Experiences and New Approaches
Moniz, Antonio; Yoshizawa, Go; Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg

Conference (2015, February 25)

Integrating social and ethical concerns in innovation practice is a well-documented and debated issue in the United States and in Europe (namely through the EU-wide PACITA project). Related developments ... [more ▼]

Integrating social and ethical concerns in innovation practice is a well-documented and debated issue in the United States and in Europe (namely through the EU-wide PACITA project). Related developments in other parts of the world are less discernible – at least to Westerns. Yet, as witnessed by the emergence of technology assessment (TA) in countries like Japan, TA and TA-like activities have a unique and long history and continue to play a role in contemporary STI processes (e.g. in the area of citizen engagement with nanotechnologies, or energy policy). Taking these observations as its entry point, this panel asks how STI governance is locally enacted in Asian knowledge-driven economies. Like their Western counterparts, nations like China, Indonesia, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, etc., have undergone, and continue to undergo, rapid science- and technology-driven industrialization. In these processes, TA and TA-like activities develop with STI policies and programs and typically do so in nation- and region-specific ways. To render these processes, policies, and programs visible, and understand their implications for STI governance, this panel will discuss contributions that: • Describe and conceptualize how TA and TA-like activities have emerged in Asian KBEs, and in what particular forms (e.g. academic and parliamentary TA programs, linked to certain technologies and/or actors, which methods are used and why, etc.). • Reflect how these activities has evolved with, sustained, and/or countered, STI policies on the regional, national, and international level. • Compare and contrast how TA is, or is not, institutionalized in Asian countries and regions, e.g. through initiatives to initiate or abolish various TA forms, such as health TA, early-warning TA, and parliamentary TA; and/or point to prospects for TA capacity building. • Situate the above processes within a broader theory of, and movement towards, new STI governance frameworks, such as anticipatory governance, responsible innovation, public engagement, and/or others. By placing the development in historical, sociological, and comparative perspective, the panel seeks to open a space for critical reflection on the potential, problems, and limitations of initiating TA in Asia and draw connections to STI governance processes in other KBEs across the globe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDe- and Re-Institutionalizing Technology Assessment in Contemporary Knowledge-Based Economies
Delvenne, Pierre ULg; Charlier, Nathan ULg; Rosskamp, Benedikt ULg et al

in Technikfolgenabschätzung - Theorie und Praxis (2015), 24(1), 130

This article illuminates the potential role of technology assessment (TA) in knowl- edge-driven science, technology and inno- vation (STI) regimes by providing a compar- ative review of Flemish and ... [more ▼]

This article illuminates the potential role of technology assessment (TA) in knowl- edge-driven science, technology and inno- vation (STI) regimes by providing a compar- ative review of Flemish and Walloon TA. It draws critical attention to the ways in which TA actors and institutes in Flanders and Wal- lonia position themselves, or are positioned, in relation to dominant innovation policies and large-scale political transformations, notably the convergence of STI around the knowledge-based economy (KBE) and the regionalization of STI policy in Belgium. The article’s findings shed light on the Flemish government’s recent decision to close its parliamentary TA institute and the institution- al expansion of TA in Wallonia and elsewhere in Europe. It argues that TA has politics, as TA in Flanders and Wallonia aligns with the advent of strategic science and is also affil- iated to specific political parties. As these considerations run counter to the dominant representation of TA as a neutral governance tool that serves the needs of all STI decision makers, they draw into question the viability and utility of TA within contemporary KBEs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTechnology Assessment in East Asia: Experiences and New Approaches
Moniz, Antonio; Yoshizawa, Go; Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg

in Scherz, Constanze (Ed.) Proceedings from the PACITA 2015 Conference - The Next Horizon of Technology Assessment (2015)

Technology assessment (TA) and TA-like activities in countries like Japan have a unique history and continue to play a role in contemporary science, technology, and innovation (STI) processes. The aim of ... [more ▼]

Technology assessment (TA) and TA-like activities in countries like Japan have a unique history and continue to play a role in contemporary science, technology, and innovation (STI) processes. The aim of the discussion of TA’s experience in East Asia is how STI governance is locally enacted in Asian knowledge-driven economies, as TA activities develop in conjunction with STI policies and programs. To render these processes, policies, and programs visible and to understand their implications for STI governance, a panel at the Berlin conference on TA discussed contributions that described and conceptualized, for example, how TA activities have emerged in Asian knowledge-based economies (KBE), in which particular forms (e.g., academic and parliamentary TA programs), to which technologies and/or actors they are linked, and which methods are used and why. The panel also sought to compare and contrast how TA is (or is not) institutionalized in Asian countries and regions, and to point to prospects for expansion of TA capacity. In doing so, the panellists placed the development of TA in a historical, sociological, and comparative perspective, and opened space for critical reflection on the potential, problems, and limitations associated with initiating TA in Asia and with KBEs overall. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)