References of "VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPsychological interventions influence patients' attitudes and beliefs about their chronic pain.
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Gillet, Aline; MALAISE, Nicole ULiege et al

in Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA method for independent component graph analysis of resting-state fMRI. Brain and Behavior 2017, in press
Ribeiro de Paula, Demetrius; Ziegler, Erik; Abeyasinghe, P et al

in Brain and Behavior (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (7 ULiège)
See detailDisorders of consciousness: new advances in neuroimaging techniques
Soddu, Andrea ULiege; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

in Zanotti, Bruno (Ed.) Vegetative State (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 146 (11 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail2 Years outcome of patients in unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and minimally conscious state
Cassol, Helena ULiege; LEDOUX, Didier ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege et al

Poster (2017, March)

INTRODUCTION: Following severe acute brain damage, patients typically evolve from coma to an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state (UWS/VS; wakefulness without awareness) and later to a ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Following severe acute brain damage, patients typically evolve from coma to an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state (UWS/VS; wakefulness without awareness) and later to a minimally conscious state (MCS; fluctuating but consistent nonreflex behaviors). MCS is subcategorized in MCS+ (i.e., command following) and MCS- (i.e., visual pursuit, localization of noxious stimulation or contingent behaviours). Reliable and consistent interactive communication and/or functional use of objects indicate the next boundary – emergence from MCS (EMCS). To date, there is still no reliable predictive model of recovery from the UWS/VS and the MCS. A better understanding of patients' outcome would help in decisions regarding patients’ care and rehabilitation, as well as end-of-life decisions. METHODS: We collected demographic information, acute care history and longitudinal follow-up of patients in UWS/VS and MCS admitted in 15 expert centers in Belgium (via the Belgian Federal Public Service Health). Patients were evaluated at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months post injury with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised and the diagnosis was based on internationally accepted criteria of UWS/VS, MCS or EMCS. Results were considered significant at p<0.001. RESULTS: 24 months follow-up was available for 476 patients including 261 diagnosed in UWS/VS (88 traumatic, 173 non-traumatic) and 215 diagnosed in MCS (80 traumatic, 135 non-traumatic) one month after the injury. Patients who were in MCS one month after the insult were more likely to recover functional communication or object use after 24 months than patients in UWS/VS. Moreover, functional recovery occurred more often in MCS+ (79%) as compared to MCS- (29%), and mortality rate was more important in MCS- patients (68%) as compared to MCS+ (21%). Comparisons within UWS/VS and MCS groups based on etiology showed that traumatic patients had a better outcome at 24 months than non-traumatic patients. Among non-traumatic patients, no difference was found between anoxic patients and patients with other etiologies regarding functional recovery. CONCLUSION: Our study highlights that the outcome is significantly better for patients who are in MCS one month post-injury as compared to patients who remain in UWS/VS at that time. Concerning MCS patients, the outcome is significantly better for patients who are MCS+ one month post-injury as compared to patients who are MCS- at that time. This study also confirms that patients with traumatic etiology have better prognosis than patients with non-traumatic causes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailApprentissage d'auto-hypnose/self-care en oncologie. Pour qui? Comment? Pour quel intérêt?
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULiege; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

in Psycho-Oncologie (2017), 11

Les symptômes physiques les plus fréquemment liés au cancer et à ses traitements sont la douleur, les nausées et la fatigue. Ils peuvent influencer négativement la qualité de vie. Les interventions de ... [more ▼]

Les symptômes physiques les plus fréquemment liés au cancer et à ses traitements sont la douleur, les nausées et la fatigue. Ils peuvent influencer négativement la qualité de vie. Les interventions de groupe visant l’apprentissage de l’autohypnose, associé ou non à l’autobienveillance, ont démontré l’amélioration de l’adaptation des patients oncologiques. Le but de cette revue est de relever l’efficacité de l’hypnose dans la gestion des symptômes liés à la maladie et de mieux comprendre les mécanismes de la technique. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (32 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMirror efficiency in the assessment of visual pursuit in patients in minimally conscious state.
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Laureys, Steven ULiege et al

in Brain Injury (2017)

OBJECTIVE: Visual pursuit should be tested with a mirror in patients with disorders of consciousness. This stimulus was indeed more efficient than a person or an object, and the auto-referential aspect ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Visual pursuit should be tested with a mirror in patients with disorders of consciousness. This stimulus was indeed more efficient than a person or an object, and the auto-referential aspect was supposed to be the key feature. The present study tested the hypothesis that the mirror was more efficient because of its self-aspect. METHODS: The mirror was compared (1) to the patient's picture and to the picture of a famous face, in 22 patients in minimally conscious state and (2) to the patient's picture and a fake mirror, which had dynamical and bright aspects of the mirror, without reflecting the face, in 26 other patients in minimally conscious state. RESULTS: The mirror was more efficient than the patient's picture, which was not statistically different from the famous face. The second part of the study confirmed the statistical difference between the mirror and the picture. However, the fake mirror was neither statistically different from the mirror nor from the picture. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the hypothesis proposed by previous studies was partly wrong, they confirm that the mirror is the best stimulus to use when assessing visual pursuit. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (12 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose : un outil de modulation cérébrale ?
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; STAQUET, Cécile ULiege; Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege et al

in Froger; Laffont; Dupeyron (Eds.) et al La plasticité cérébrale. (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (9 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailFeasibility of Oral Feeding in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
MAUDOUX, Audrey ULiege; Breuskin, I; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

in Schnakers, C; LAUREYS, Steven (Eds.) Coma and Disorders of Consciousness, Second Edition (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSedation of Patients With Disorders of Consciousness During Neuroimaging: Effects on Resting State Functional Brain Connectivity.
KIRSCH, Murielle ULiege; Guldenmund, Pieter; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2017), 124(2),

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (18 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrevalence of coma-recovery scale-revised signs of consciousness in patients in minimally conscious state
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; Azzolini, Deborah et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResting-state Network-specific Breakdown of Functional Connectivity during Ketamine Alteration of Consciousness in Volunteers
BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Demertzi, Athina ULiege et al

in Anesthesiology (2016), 125(5), 873-878

Background: Consciousness-altering anesthetic agents disturb connectivity between brain regions composing the resting-state consciousness networks (RSNs). The default mode network (DMn), executive control ... [more ▼]

Background: Consciousness-altering anesthetic agents disturb connectivity between brain regions composing the resting-state consciousness networks (RSNs). The default mode network (DMn), executive control network, salience network (SALn), auditory network, sensorimotor network (SMn), and visual network sustain mentation. Ketamine modifies consciousness differently from other agents, producing psychedelic dreaming and no apparent interaction with the environment. The authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore ketamine-induced changes in RSNs connectivity. Methods: Fourteen healthy volunteers received stepwise intravenous infusions of ketamine up to loss of responsiveness. Because of agitation, data from six subjects were excluded from analysis. RSNs connectivity was compared between absence of ketamine (wake state [W1]), light ketamine sedation, and ketamine-induced unresponsiveness (deep sedation [S2]). Results: Increasing the depth of ketamine sedation from W1 to S2 altered DMn and SALn connectivity and suppressed the anticorrelated activity between DMn and other brain regions. During S2, DMn connectivity, particularly between the medial prefrontal cortex and the remaining network (effect size β [95% CI]: W1 = 0.20 [0.18 to 0.22]; S2 = 0.07 [0.04 to 0.09]), and DMn anticorrelated activity (e.g., right sensory cortex: W1 = −0.07 [−0.09 to −0.04]; S2 = 0.04 [0.01 to 0.06]) were broken down. SALn connectivity was nonuniformly suppressed (e.g., left parietal operculum: W1 = 0.08 [0.06 to 0.09]; S2 = 0.05 [0.02 to 0.07]). Executive control networks, auditory network, SMn, and visual network were minimally affected. Conclusions: Ketamine induces specific changes in connectivity within and between RSNs. Breakdown of frontoparietal DMn connectivity and DMn anticorrelation and sensory and SMn connectivity preservation are common to ketamine and propofol-induced alterations of consciousness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (19 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose: on it’s very existence
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege

Conference (2016, April 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (9 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRepeated Behavioral Assessments in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Annen, Jitka ULiege; Aubinet, Charlène ULiege et al

Conference (2016, March 04)

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might ... [more ▼]

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might suffer from consciousness fluctuations, but it is not specified how many assessments are needed. The present study included 131 patients with DOC. They have been assessed at least 6 times during a 14-days period with the CRS-R. Results show that 5 CRS-R assessments are needed to reach a reliable diagnosis, and that all the CRS-R subscales are influenced by consciousness fluctuations. We here showed that consciousness fluctuations influence the behavioral diagnosis, and that 5 assessments within a short period of time are needed to get a reliable clinical diagnosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 135 (30 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCorrelation between resting state fMRI total neuronal activity and PET metabolism in healthy controls and patients with disorders of consciousness
Soddu, Andrea ULiege; Gomez, Francisco; Heine, Lizette ULiege et al

in Brain and Behavior (2016), 6(1), 1-15

Introduction: The mildly invasive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging technique to measure ‘resting state’ cerebral metabolism. This technique made ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The mildly invasive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging technique to measure ‘resting state’ cerebral metabolism. This technique made it possible to assess changes in metabolic activity in clinical applications, such as the study of severe brain injury and disorders of consciousness. Objective: We assessed the possi- bility of creating functional MRI activity maps, which could estimate the rela- tive levels of activity in FDG-PET cerebral metabolic maps. If no metabolic absolute measures can be extracted, our approach may still be of clinical use in centers without access to FDG-PET. It also overcomes the problem of recogniz- ing individual networks of independent component selection in functional mag- netic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting state analysis. Methods: We extracted resting state fMRI functional connectivity maps using independent component analysis and combined only components of neuronal origin. To assess neu- ronality of components a classification based on support vector machine (SVM) was used. We compared the generated maps with the FDG-PET maps in 16 healthy controls, 11 vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients and four locked-in patients. Results: The results show a significant similarity with q = 0.75  0.05 for healthy controls and q = 0.58  0.09 for vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients between the FDG- PET and the fMRI based maps. FDG-PET, fMRI neuronal maps, and the conjunction analysis show decreases in frontoparietal and medial regions in vegetative patients with respect to controls. Subsequent analysis in locked-in syndrome patients produced also consistent maps with healthy controls. Conclusions: The constructed resting state fMRI functional connectivity map points toward the possibility for fMRI resting state to estimate relative levels of activity in a metabolic map. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (20 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation clinique des états de conscience altérée
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege

Conference (2015, November 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 ULiège)