References of "Twizere, Jean-Claude"
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See detailIdentification of VZV ORF9p potential cellular partners that could be important for the viral egress.
Lebrun, Marielle ULg; riva, laura; Rambout, Xavier ULg et al

Poster (2015, July 26)

ORF9p (homologous to HSV-1 VP22) is a VZV tegument protein essential for the viral replication. During the lytic cycle it is the mostly expressed gene. We have recently demonstrated that it is a substrate ... [more ▼]

ORF9p (homologous to HSV-1 VP22) is a VZV tegument protein essential for the viral replication. During the lytic cycle it is the mostly expressed gene. We have recently demonstrated that it is a substrate of the viral kinase ORF47p and that its ORF47p-dependent phosphorylation is important for the secondary envelopment process. We also have identified an acidic cluster (AC) within the protein that is important for its correct localization in the infected cells and for the interaction with ORF47p. The recombinant VZV expressing ORF9p-ΔAC presents an accumulation of capsids in the perinuclear space. ORF9p seems then to play an important role in several steps of the egress process. In this context, we sought to identify cellular partners of ORF9p that might be important for these functions. We performed a yeast two hybrid screen against the human ORFeome 5.1. and picked out 44 candidates among which 5 proteins playing roles in membrane organization and targeting. We currently are trying to confirm these interactions in infected cells and to assess the role of these interactions for the viral lytic cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailA fungal biofilm reactor based on metal structured packing improves the quality of a Gla::GFP fusion protein produced by Aspergillus oryzae
Zune, Quentin ULg; Delepierre, Anissa ULg; Gofflot, Sebastien et al

in Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology (2015)

Fungal biofilm is known to promote the excretion of secondary metabolites in accordance with solid-state related physiological mechanisms. This work is based on the comparative analysis of classical ... [more ▼]

Fungal biofilm is known to promote the excretion of secondary metabolites in accordance with solid-state related physiological mechanisms. This work is based on the comparative analysis of classical submerged fermentation with a fungal biofilm reactor for the production of a Gla::GFP fusion protein by Aspergillus oryzae. The biofilm reactor comprises a metal structured packing allowing the attachment of the fungal biomass. Since the production of the target protein is under the control of the promoter glaB, specifically induced in solid-state fermentation, the biofilm mode of culture is expected to enhance the global productivity. Although production of the target protein was enhanced by using the biofilm mode of culture, we also found that fusion protein production is also significant when the submerged mode of culture is used. This result is related to high shear stress leading to biomass autolysis and leakage of intracellular fusion protein into the extracellular medium. Moreover, 2D-gel electrophoresis highlights the preservation of fusion protein integrity produced in biofilm conditions. Two fungal biofilm reactor designs were then investigated further, i.e. with full immersion of the packing or with medium recirculation on the packing, and the scale-up potentialities were evaluated. In this context, it has been shown that full immersion of the metal packing in the liquid medium during cultivation allows for a uniform colonization of the packing by the fungal biomass and leads to a better quality of the fusion protein. [less ▲]

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See detailßarrestin coupling of the orphan GPCR GPR27
Dupuis, Nadine ULg; Gilissen, Julie ULg; Derj, Anouar ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

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See detailKPC2 relocalizes HOXA2 to the cytoplasm and decreases its transcriptional activity.
Bridoux, Laure; Bergiers, Isabelle; Draime, Amandine et al

in Biochimica et biophysica acta (2015), 1849(10), 1298-311

Regulation of transcription factor activity relies on molecular interactions or enzymatic modifications which influence their interaction with DNA cis-regulatory sequences, their transcriptional ... [more ▼]

Regulation of transcription factor activity relies on molecular interactions or enzymatic modifications which influence their interaction with DNA cis-regulatory sequences, their transcriptional activation or repression, and stability or intracellular distribution of these proteins. Regarding the well-conserved Hox protein family, a restricted number of activity regulators have been highlighted thus far. In the framework of a proteome-wide screening aiming at identifying proteins interacting with Hoxa2, KPC2, an adapter protein constitutive of the KPC ubiquitin-ligase complex, was identified. In this work, KPC2 was confirmed as being a genuine interactor of Hoxa2 by co-precipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. At functional level, KPC2 diminishes the transcriptional activity and induces the nuclear exit of Hoxa2. Gene expression analyses revealed that Kpc2 is active in restricted areas of the developing mouse embryo which overlap with the Hoxa2 expression domain. Together, our data support that KPC2 regulates Hoxa2 by promoting its relocation to the cytoplasm. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative Interactome of HIV-1 Tat and Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1 Tax and the Cellular Transcriptional Machinery.
Vandermeulen, Charlotte; Hajingabo, Leon-Juvenal; Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg

in AIDS research and human retroviruses (2015), 31(12), 1204-5

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See detailTargeting oncogenic interleukin-7 receptor signalling with N-acetylcysteine in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
Mansour, Marc R.; Reed, Casie; Eisenberg, Amy R. et al

in British journal of haematology (2015), 168(2), 230-8

Activating mutations of the interleukin-7 receptor (IL7R) occur in approximately 10% of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Most mutations generate a cysteine at the transmembrane ... [more ▼]

Activating mutations of the interleukin-7 receptor (IL7R) occur in approximately 10% of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Most mutations generate a cysteine at the transmembrane domain leading to receptor homodimerization through disulfide bond formation and ligand-independent activation of STAT5. We hypothesized that the reducing agent N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-tolerated drug used widely in clinical practice to treat acetaminophen overdose, would reduce disulfide bond formation, and inhibit mutant IL7R-mediated oncogenic signalling. We found that treatment with NAC disrupted IL7R homodimerization in IL7R-mutant DND-41 cells as assessed by non-reducing Western blot, as well as in a luciferase complementation assay. NAC led to STAT5 dephosphorylation and cell apoptosis at clinically achievable concentrations in DND-41 cells, and Ba/F3 cells transformed by an IL7R-mutant construct containing a cysteine insertion. The apoptotic effects of NAC could be rescued in part by a constitutively active allele of STAT5. Despite using doses lower than those tolerated in humans, NAC treatment significantly inhibited the progression of human DND-41 cells engrafted in immunodeficient mice. Thus, targeting leukaemogenic IL7R homodimerization with NAC offers a potentially effective and feasible therapeutic strategy that warrants testing in patients with T-ALL. [less ▲]

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See detailLIGAND-INDEPENDENT IDENTIFICATION OF ORPHAN GPCR ARRESTIN BINDING
Dupuis, Nadine ULg; Gilissen, Julie ULg; Derj, Anouar ULg et al

Poster (2014, June 05)

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See detailScale-down effect on the extracellular proteome of Escherichia coli: correlation with membrane permeability and modulation according substrate heterogeneities
Brognaux, Alison ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg; Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering (2014)

Protein leakage is induced in well-mixed fed-batch bioreactor by comparison with cultures carried out in scale-down conditions. This effect is attributed to a progressive increase of cell membrane ... [more ▼]

Protein leakage is induced in well-mixed fed-batch bioreactor by comparison with cultures carried out in scale-down conditions. This effect is attributed to a progressive increase of cell membrane permeability and the synthesis of several outer-membrane components allowing to cope with substrate limitation commonly found in high-cell density culture. A comparative analysis of protein leakage has thus been performed in well-mixed bioreactors and in scale-down devices. The extracellular proteome of E.coli has been investigated by 2D-gel electrophoresis and identified by subsequent MALDI-TOF analysis. On 110 picked spots, 67 proteins have been identified and the sub-localisation and the molecular function of these proteins have been determined. A majority of the extracellular proteome was composed of outer-membrane and periplasmic proteins (64%) confirming the fact that leakage is involved in high-cell density cultures. About 50% of this extracellular proteome was composed of transport and binding proteins. Furthermore, the more abundant spots on the gel corresponded to porin proteins and periplasmic transporters. In particular, the OmpC porin was found to be very abundant. Moreover, the scale-down effect on this extracellular proteome has been investigated by 2D-DIGE analysis (2-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis) and significant differences have been observed by comparison with culture carried out in well-mixed systems. Indeed, since substrate limitation signal is alleviated in this kind of apparatus, cell permeability was lowered as shown by flow cytometry. In scale-down conditions, protein leakage was thus less abundant. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel activating mutations lacking cysteine in type I cytokine receptors in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Shochat, Chen; Tal, Noa; Gryshkova, Vitalina et al

in Blood (2014), 124(1), 106-10

Gain-of-function somatic mutations introducing cysteines to either the extracellular or to the transmembrane domain (TMD) in interleukin-7 receptor alpha (IL7R) or cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2 ... [more ▼]

Gain-of-function somatic mutations introducing cysteines to either the extracellular or to the transmembrane domain (TMD) in interleukin-7 receptor alpha (IL7R) or cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2) have been described in acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Here we report noncysteine in-frame mutations in IL7R and CRLF2 located in a region of the TMD closer to the cytosolic domain. Biochemical and functional assays showed that these are activating mutations conferring cytokine-independent growth of progenitor lymphoid cells in vitro and are transforming in vivo. Protein fragment complementation assays suggest that despite the absence of cysteines, the mechanism of activation is through ligand-independent dimerization. Mutagenesis experiments and ConSurf calculations suggest that the mutations stabilize the homodimeric conformation, positioning the cytosolic kinases in predefined orientation to each other, thereby inducing spontaneous receptor activation independently of external signals. Hence, type I cytokine receptors may be activated in leukemia through 2 types of transmembrane somatic dimerizing mutations. [less ▲]

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See detailA proteome-scale map of the human interactome network.
Rolland, Thomas; Tasan, Murat; Charloteaux, Benoît ULg et al

in Cell (2014), 159(5), 1212-26

Just as reference genome sequences revolutionized human genetics, reference maps of interactome networks will be critical to fully understand genotype-phenotype relationships. Here, we describe a ... [more ▼]

Just as reference genome sequences revolutionized human genetics, reference maps of interactome networks will be critical to fully understand genotype-phenotype relationships. Here, we describe a systematic map of ?14,000 high-quality human binary protein-protein interactions. At equal quality, this map is ?30% larger than what is available from small-scale studies published in the literature in the last few decades. While currently available information is highly biased and only covers a relatively small portion of the proteome, our systematic map appears strikingly more homogeneous, revealing a broader" human interactome network than currently appreciated. The map also uncovers significant interconnectivity between known and candidate cancer gene products, providing unbiased evidence for an expanded functional cancer landscape, while demonstrating how high-quality interactome models will help "connect the dots" of the genomic revolution." [less ▲]

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See detailAn interaction map for HTLV-1 Tax and PDZ-containing proteins
Blibek, Karim ULg; Rambout, Xavier ULg; Beaufays, Jérome et al

in Retrovirology (2014), 11

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See detailPredicting interactome networks perturbations in human cancer: application to gene fusions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Juvenal Hajingabo, Leon; Daakour, Sarah ULg; Martin, Maud ULg et al

in Molecular biology of the cell (2014)

Genomic variations such as point mutations and gene fusions are directly or indirectly associated with human diseases. They are recognized as diagnostic, prognostic markers and therapeutic targets ... [more ▼]

Genomic variations such as point mutations and gene fusions are directly or indirectly associated with human diseases. They are recognized as diagnostic, prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. However, predicting the functional impact of these genetic alterations beyond affected genes and their products is challenging because diseased phenotypes are likely dependent of complex molecular interaction networks. Using as models three different chromosomal translocations ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1), BCR-ABL1, and TCF3-PBX1 (E2A-PBX1), frequently found in precursor-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (preB-ALL), we develop an approach to extract perturbed molecular interactions from gene expression changes. We show that the MYC and JunD transcriptional circuits are specifically deregulated following ETV6-RUNX1 and TCF3-PBX1 gene fusions, respectively. We also identified the bulk mRNA NXF1-dependent machinery as a direct target for the TCF3-PBX1 fusion protein. Through a novel approach combining gene expression and interactome data analysis, we provide new insight into TCF3-PBX1 and ETV6-RUNX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia. [less ▲]

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See detailAn interaction map for HTLV-1 Tax and PDZ-containing proteins.
Blibek, Karim ULg; Rambout, Xavier ULg; beaufays, Jérôme et al

Poster (2013, June 29)

Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) retrovirus encodes for the Tax protein, which has a transforming capacity in vitro. Tax contains at its C-terminus a binding motif for PDZ domain-containing ... [more ▼]

Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) retrovirus encodes for the Tax protein, which has a transforming capacity in vitro. Tax contains at its C-terminus a binding motif for PDZ domain-containing proteins (PSD95-DLG1-ZO1). It has been shown that the C-terminal motif of Tax is involved in Tax oncogenic capacity. Ten different PDZ domain-containing proteins have been reported to interact with Tax, but the specificity of Tax-human PDZome interactions has not been investigated. The objective of this study is to obtain a comprehensive interactome map for Tax and the human PDZome and to determine a global role of Tax-PDZ interactions in HTLV-1 biology. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibition of Tax transformation activity using a small molecule targetting Tax/PDZ domain interactions.
Blibek, Karim ULg; Fujii, Naoaki; Legros, Sebastien et al

Poster (2013, June 29)

Primate T-lymphotropic virus species comprise four members (HTLV-1 to -4) that have been discovered in human. Only the HTLV-1 infection leads to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and tropical spastic ... [more ▼]

Primate T-lymphotropic virus species comprise four members (HTLV-1 to -4) that have been discovered in human. Only the HTLV-1 infection leads to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP), an immune degenerative neurologic syndrome. All the four viruses share a similar genomic organization and encode transforming Tax oncoproteins. In contrast to HTLV-2 and 4, HTLV-1 and 3 Tax proteins contain a PSD-95/Drosophila Discs Large/Zona Occludens-I (PDZ) binding motif at their C-terminal that has been shown to play crucial roles in the distinct transforming properties of the Tax proteins. To systematically investigate PDZ-containing proteins roles in HTLV-1 biology, we initiated a global interactome network analysis of Tax and associated human PDZ-containing proteins. This was accomplished through the use of our framework of binary interactome mapping that includes stringent yeast two hybrid and pulldown screening, systematic retesting by protein complementation assay and evaluation of PDZ gene expression in T lymphocytes. [less ▲]

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