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See detailOsteopontin predicts radiotherapy response of glioblastoma patients : new role in DNA damage repair
Henry, Aurélie ULg; Nokin, Marie-Julie; Leroi, Natacha ULg et al

Conference (2016, March 22)

- Introduction: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and common solid human brain tumor. Because of GBM heterogeneity, location and aggressiveness, none of the available treatment is curative. These ... [more ▼]

- Introduction: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and common solid human brain tumor. Because of GBM heterogeneity, location and aggressiveness, none of the available treatment is curative. These treatments include maximal surgical resection, radiotherapy and concomitant or adjuvant chemotherapy with Temozolomide. However, the prognosis of adult patients with GBM remains poor and the survival outcome after treatment does not exceed 15 months. GBM-composing cells have developed many strategies to counteract these current therapies. Among the wide hallmarks acquired to survive, high osteopontin (OPN) expression correlates with lower overall and disease-free/relapse-free survival in all tumors combined, as well in brain cancer. Our recent study (Lamour V and Henry A, IJC 2015) has demonstrated the role of OPN in the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells and its importance in the maintenance of the stem characters. In the continuation of this work, our recent studies focused on the potential role of OPN in the resistance of GBM cells to radiotherapy and its potential implication in the initiation of Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) repair mechanisms. - Aims: In the context of this study, different GBM cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG and U87 Viii) were used to assess the role of OPN in the initiation of the DSBs repair mechanism after an exposure to gamma-irradiation. - Methods and results: We performed the transient transfection of different GBM cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG and U87-MG overexpressing EGFR VIII) with siRNAs specifically directed against OPN. After irradiation, all these OPN-depleted cells consistently showed a lower induction of γ–H2AX compared to control (irrelevant siRNA) as evidenced by western blot and immunofluorescence techniques. Thereafter, clonogenic assays allowed to prove that the survival of OPN-depleted cells was affected after an exposure to irradiation. To assess the importance of OPN expression in the response to radiotherapy, an heterotopic xenograft model was used. In brief, IPTG-inducible U87 shOPN clones were injected subcutaneously in NOD-SCID mice and were allowed to form a tumor. When average tumor volume reached a predetermined size range, mice were treated (or not) with IPTG by intraperitoneal injection during five days. At the end of the treatment, tumors were selectively exposed to gamma-irradiation by using a small animal irradiator X-RAD 225Cx (Precision X-Ray Inc., North Branford, CT). One week later, mice were sacrificed and tumors were measured. In this pilot study, we observed that mice in which the tumor was depleted in OPN displayed a slight regression in the tumor growth compared to mice that received radiotherapy alone (no IPTG), where the tumor volume remained constant. - Conclusions: Taken together, these preliminary data meet the fact that OPN is important in the response of GBM to radiotherapy. The in vitro results converge to the fact that OPN might be implicated in the initiation of the DSBs repair following irradiation. Currently, we would like to investigate this hypothesis in vivo but also to check the effect of OPN depletion combined to radiotherapy on the survival of mice in an orthotopic xenograft model. [less ▲]

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See detailHDAC7 inhibition resets STAT3 tumorigenic activity in human glioblastoma independently of EGFR and PTEN: new opportunities for selected targeted therapies
Peixoto, Paul; Blomme, Arnaud; Costanza, Brunella ULg et al

in Oncogene (2016)

To date, the mutational status of EGFR and PTEN has been shown as relevant for favoring pro- or anti-tumor functions of STAT3 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We have screened genomic data from 154 ... [more ▼]

To date, the mutational status of EGFR and PTEN has been shown as relevant for favoring pro- or anti-tumor functions of STAT3 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We have screened genomic data from 154 patients and have identified a strong positive correlation between STAT3 and HDAC7 expression. In the current work we show the existence of a subpopulation of patients overexpressing HDAC7 and STAT3 that has particularly poor clinical outcome. Surprisingly, the somatic mutation rate of both STAT3 and HDAC7 was insignificant in GBM comparing with EGFR, PTEN or TP53. Depletion of HDAC7 in a range of GBM cells induced the expression of tyrosine kinase JAK1 and the tumor suppressor AKAP12. Both proteins synergistically sustained the activity of STAT3 by inducing its phosphorylation (JAK1) and protein expression (AKAP12). In absence of HDAC7, activated STAT3 was responsible for significant imbalance of secreted pro-/anti-angiogenic factors. This inhibited the migration and sprouting of endothelial cells in paracrine fashion in vitro as well as angiogenesis in vivo. In a murine model of GBM, induced HDAC7-silencing decreased the tumor burden by threefold. The current data show for the first time that silencing HDAC7 can reset the tumor suppressor activity of STAT3, independently of the EGFR/PTEN/TP53 background of the GBM. This effect could be exploited to overcome tumor heterogeneity and provide a new rationale behind the development of specific HDAC7 inhibitors for clinical use. [less ▲]

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See detailMyoferlin plays a key role in VEGFA secretion and impacts tumor-associated angiogenesis in human pancreas cancer
Fahmy, Karim ULg; Gonzalez, Arnaud; Arafa, Mohammad et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2016), 138

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most deadly forms of cancers with no satisfactory treatment to date. Recent studies have identified myoferlin, a ferlin family member, in human pancreas ... [more ▼]

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most deadly forms of cancers with no satisfactory treatment to date. Recent studies have identified myoferlin, a ferlin family member, in human pancreas adenocarcinoma where its expression was associated to a bad prognosis. However, the function of myoferlin in pancreas adenocarcinoma has not been reported. In other cell types, myoferlin is involved in several key plasma membrane processes such as fusion, repair, endocytosis and tyrosine kinase receptor activity. In this study, we showed that myoferlin silencing in BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation in vitro and in a significant reduction of the tumor volume in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. In addition to be smaller, the tumors formed by the myoferlin-silenced cells showed a marked absence of functional blood vessels. We further demonstrated that this effect was due, at least in part, to an inhibition of VEGFA secretion by BxPC-3 myoferlin-silenced cells. Using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we linked the decreased VEGFA secretion to an impairment of VEGFA exocytosis. The clinical relevance of our results was further strengthened by a significant correlation between myoferlin expression in a series of human pancreatic malignant lesions and their angiogenic status evaluated by the determination of the blood vessel density. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteopontin as a new target in glioblastoma progression and resistance to radiotherapy
Henry, Aurélie ULg; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 10)

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and common solid human brain tumor. Because of GBM heterogeneity, location and aggressiveness, none of the available treatment is curative. These treatments ... [more ▼]

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and common solid human brain tumor. Because of GBM heterogeneity, location and aggressiveness, none of the available treatment is curative. These treatments include maximal surgical resection, radiotherapy and concomitant or adjuvant chemotherapy with Temozolomide (TMZ). However, the prognosis of adult patients with GBM remains poor and the survival outcome after treatment does not exceed 15 months. Glioblastoma-composing cells have developed many strategies to counteract these current therapies. Among the wide hallmarks acquired to survive, osteopontin (OPN) ranks correlates with lower overall and disease-free/relapse-free survival in all tumors combined, as well in brain cancer. OPN expression is largely considered as a molecular cancer marker associated with poor prognosis for patients with cancer. Our preliminary works (Lamour V and Henry A, IJC 2015) have demonstrated the role of OPN in the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells and its importance in the maintenance of the stem charachters. Within the continuance of this work, our recent studies focused on the potential role of OPN in the resistance of glioblastoma cells to radiotherapy and its implication in the initiation of Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) repair mechanism. In this context, U251-MG and U87-MG cells were used to assess the role of OPN in the initiation of the DSBs repair mechanism after an exposure to gamma-irradiation (γ–IR). The transient transfection of both cell lines with siRNA directed against OPN shown a lower induction of γ–H2AX compared to control (irrelevant siRNA). The survival of U251-OPN depleted cells was also affected after an exposure to γ–IR (based on clonogenic assays). However, the sole depletion of OPN in U87 cells affected their survival (independently of the γ–IR). To prove that the secreted form of OPN is necessary to survive after γ–IR, conditionned medium of U87-shSCR clones (rich in OPN) was used to treat U87shOPN clones before an exposure to γ–IR. By immunofluorescence, we observed that the γ–H2AX staining was higher in U87 shOPN clones than when treated with their own conditionned medium (poor in OPN). Currently, we are investigating the in vivo implication of OPN in the initiation of DSBs repair mechanism after an exposure of mice to γ–IR (whole brain exposure). For this purpose, IPTG-inducible U87 shRNA clones (SCR and OPN) have been generated and validated for an orthotopic xenograft model in NOD-SCID mice. The survival after a radiotherapy of 10 Gy (2Gy per day for 5 days) will be assessed in OPN-positive and –negative tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these datas suggest that OPN could represent an important pronostic factor for patient response to radiotherapy in the context of GBM. [less ▲]

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See detailExpel: a novel non-destructive method for mining soluble tumor biomarkers
Costanza, B; Blomme, A; MUTIJIMA NZARAMBA, Eugène ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2015, March), 78(1), 13

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See detailMetabolomic, proteomic and preclinical imaging of patient-derived tumor xenografts for improving treatment of liver metastases patients
Perez Palacios, A; Blomme, A; Boutry, S et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2015, March), 78(1), 134

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See detailMyoferlin: an indispensable component in VEGFA secretion by pancreas cancer cells
Fahmy, Karim ULg; Peulen, Olivier ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 31)

In this poster, our laboratory showed the importance of myoferlin, a biomarker of pancreas cancer, in the controle of VEGF-A mediated angiogenesis. Our laboratory showed that silencing myoferlin in ... [more ▼]

In this poster, our laboratory showed the importance of myoferlin, a biomarker of pancreas cancer, in the controle of VEGF-A mediated angiogenesis. Our laboratory showed that silencing myoferlin in pancreas cancer cells, BxPC-3, provoques a decrease in cell prolifération in vitro and a decrease in tumor volumes in animal model. Myoferlin silencing also provokes a decrease in VEGF-A secretion in the conditioned medium and that decrease was abserved in the animal model as a decrease in microvessels dencity. It appeared that this decrease in secretion is due to a a blockage in the exocytosis. Our data also showed a significate correlation between myoferlin expression and microvessels density in patients section. [less ▲]

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See detailTargeting osteopontin suppresses glioblastoma stem-like cell character and tumorigenicity in vivo
Lamour, Virginie; Henry, Aurélie ULg; Kroonen, Jerome et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2015)

Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted protein involved in most aspects of tumor progression and metastasis development. Elevated OPN expression has been reported in multiple types of cancer including ... [more ▼]

Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted protein involved in most aspects of tumor progression and metastasis development. Elevated OPN expression has been reported in multiple types of cancer including glioblastoma (GBM), the highest grade and most aggressive brain tumor. GBMs contain a subpopulation of glioma-initiating cells (GICs) implicated in progression, therapeutic resistance and recurrence. We have previously demonstrated that OPN silencing inhibited GBM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, activation of CD44 signaling upon OPN ligation has been recently implicated in the acquisition of a stem cell phenotype by GBM cells. The present study is aimed to explore OPN autocrine function using shRNA silencing strategy in GICs enriched from GBM cell lines and a human primary GBM grown in EGF and bFGF defined medium. The removal of these growth factors and addition of serum induced a significant loss of OPN expression in GICs. We showed that OPN-silenced GICs were unable to grow as spheres and this capacity was restored by exogenous OPN. Importantly, the expression of Sox2, Oct3/4 and Nanog, key stemness transcription factors, was significantly decreased in GICs upon OPN targeting. We identified Akt/mTOR/p70S6K as the main signaling pathway triggered following OPN-mediated EGFR activation in GICs. Finally, in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model, the tumorigenic potential of U87-MG sphere cells was completely abrogated upon OPN silencing. Our demonstration of endogenous OPN major regulatory effects on GICs stemness phenotype and tumorigenicity implies a greater role than anticipated for OPN in GBM pathogenesis from initiation and progression to probable recurrence. [less ▲]

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See detailAsporin Is a Fibroblast-Derived TGF-beta1 Inhibitor and a Tumor Suppressor Associated with Good Prognosis in Breast Cancer.
Maris, Pamela; Blomme, Arnaud; Palacios, Ana Perez et al

in PLoS medicine (2015), 12(9), 1001871

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a leading malignancy affecting the female population worldwide. Most morbidity is caused by metastases that remain incurable to date. TGF-beta1 has been identified as a key ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a leading malignancy affecting the female population worldwide. Most morbidity is caused by metastases that remain incurable to date. TGF-beta1 has been identified as a key driving force behind metastatic breast cancer, with promising therapeutic implications. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Employing immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis, we report, to our knowledge for the first time, that asporin is overexpressed in the stroma of most human breast cancers and is not expressed in normal breast tissue. In vitro, asporin is secreted by breast fibroblasts upon exposure to conditioned medium from some but not all human breast cancer cells. While hormone receptor (HR) positive cells cause strong asporin expression, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells suppress it. Further, our findings show that soluble IL-1beta, secreted by TNBC cells, is responsible for inhibiting asporin in normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Using recombinant protein, as well as a synthetic peptide fragment, we demonstrate the ability of asporin to inhibit TGF-beta1-mediated SMAD2 phosphorylation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and stemness in breast cancer cells. In two in vivo murine models of TNBC, we observed that tumors expressing asporin exhibit significantly reduced growth (2-fold; p = 0.01) and metastatic properties (3-fold; p = 0.045). A retrospective IHC study performed on human breast carcinoma (n = 180) demonstrates that asporin expression is lowest in TNBC and HER2+ tumors, while HR+ tumors have significantly higher asporin expression (4-fold; p = 0.001). Assessment of asporin expression and patient outcome (n = 60; 10-y follow-up) shows that low protein levels in the primary breast lesion significantly delineate patients with bad outcome regardless of the tumor HR status (area under the curve = 0.87; 95% CI 0.78-0.96; p = 0.0001). Survival analysis, based on gene expression (n = 375; 25-y follow-up), confirmed that low asporin levels are associated with a reduced likelihood of survival (hazard ratio = 0.58; 95% CI 0.37-0.91; p = 0.017). Although these data highlight the potential of asporin to serve as a prognostic marker, confirmation of the clinical value would require a prospective study on a much larger patient cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that asporin is a stroma-derived inhibitor of TGF-beta1 and a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. High asporin expression is significantly associated with less aggressive tumors, stratifying patients according to the clinical outcome. Future pre-clinical studies should consider options for increasing asporin expression in TNBC as a promising strategy for targeted therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailHistone deacetylases and cancer-associated angiogenesis: current understanding of the biology and clinical perspectives.
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Peixoto, Paul; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Critical reviews in oncogenesis (2015), 20(1-2), 119-37

Histone deacetylase enzymes (HDACs) have been shown to be important to the development and progression of human cancers. Angiogenesis is a vital process that facilitates tumor growth and survival. More ... [more ▼]

Histone deacetylase enzymes (HDACs) have been shown to be important to the development and progression of human cancers. Angiogenesis is a vital process that facilitates tumor growth and survival. More than a dozen of different activators and inhibitors are involved in at least as many diverse mechanisms to control angiogenesis. HDACs directly or indirectly control many of these regulators. In the current review, we give a brief overview of molecular mechanisms of HDAC actions and link these to the current knowledge concerning HDAC-mediated regulation of tumor-associated angiogenesis. HDAC specific knockdown studies and the use of pan-HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) contributed to the identification of: (i) HDACs that are key to angiogenesis and (ii) their multiple protein targets essential for angiogenic process. The clinical development of HDACi is an active area of investigation. In the scope of this review, we highlight several preclinical studies that examine the anti-angiogenic role of HDACi. Certainly, there is still much to be learned about the use of HDACi to inhibit tumoral angiogenesis. Recent efforts in the clinics aiming to combine broad HDACi (mainly vorinostat, which is FDA approved for T-cell lymphoma) with other anti-angiogenic therapies could, however, bring the proof that the lack of specificity of pan-HDACi may not be a major issue as compared with (long-time idealized) selective inhibitors targeting one particular HDAC. [less ▲]

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See detailIntratumoral heterogeneity and consequences for targeted therapies
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in Bulletin du Cancer (2015), 102(1), 17-23

According to the clonal model and Darwinian evolution, cancer cell evolves through new mutations helping it to proliferate, migrate, invade and metastasize. Recent genetic studies have clearly shown that ... [more ▼]

According to the clonal model and Darwinian evolution, cancer cell evolves through new mutations helping it to proliferate, migrate, invade and metastasize. Recent genetic studies have clearly shown that tumors, when diagnosed, consist of a large number of mutations distributed in different cells. This heterogeneity translates in substantial genetic plasticity enabling cancer cells to adapt to any hostile environment. As targeted therapy focuses only on one pathway or protein, there will always be a cell with the "right" genetic background to survive the treatment and cause tumor relapse. Because today's targeted therapies never took tumor heterogeneity into account, nearly all novel drugs fail to provide patients with a considerable improvement of the survival. However, emerging proteomic studies guided by the idea that Darwinian selection is governed by the phenotype and not genotype, show that heterogeneity at the protein level is much less complex, then it could be expected from genetic studies. This information together with the recent trend to switch from functional to cytotoxic targeting may offer an entirely new strategy to efficiently combat cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailTriple negative tumors accumulate significantly less methylglyoxal specific adducts than other human breast cancer subtypes
Chiavarina, Barbara ULg; Nokin, Marie-Julie; Durieux, Florence ULg et al

in Oncotarget (2014)

Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of breast cancer development and progression. Methylglyoxal (MG), a glycolysis by- product, is generated through a non-enzymatic ... [more ▼]

Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of breast cancer development and progression. Methylglyoxal (MG), a glycolysis by- product, is generated through a non-enzymatic reaction from triose-phosphate intermediates. This dicarbonyl compound is highly reactive and contributes to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products. In this study, we analyzed the accumulation of Arg-pyrimidine, a MG-arginine adduct, in human breast adenocarcinoma and we observed a consistent increase of Arg-pyrimidine in cancer cells when compared with the non-tumoral counterpart. Further immunohistochemical comparative analysis of breast cancer subtypes revealed that triple negative lesions exhibited low accumulation of Arg-pyrimidine compared with other subtypes. Interestingly, the activity of glyoxalase 1 (Glo-1), an enzyme that detoxifies MG, was significantly higher in triple negative than in other subtype lesions, suggesting that these aggressive tumors are able to develop an efficient response against dicarbonyl stress. Using breast cancer cell lines, we substantiated these clinical observations by showing that, in contrast to triple positive, triple negative cells induced Glo-1 expression and activity in response to MG treatment. This is the first report that Arg- pyrimidine adduct accumulation is a consistent event in human breast cancer with a differential detection between triple negative and other breast cancer subtypes. [less ▲]

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See detailOrganized proteomic heterogeneity in colorectal liver metastases and implications for therapies
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2014, March), 77(1), 07

Introduction : Tumor heterogeneity is a major obstacle for developing effective anti-cancer treatments. Recent studies have pointed at large stochastic genetic heterogeneity within cancer lesions, where ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Tumor heterogeneity is a major obstacle for developing effective anti-cancer treatments. Recent studies have pointed at large stochastic genetic heterogeneity within cancer lesions, where no pattern seems to exist that would enable a more structured targeted therapy approach. Aim : Because to date no similar information is available at the protein (phenotype) level, we aimed at characterising the proteomic heterogeneity in human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) liver metastases. Methods & Results : We employed MALDI imaging-guided proteomics and explored the heterogeneity of extracellular distribution of over 1000 proteins we found unexpectedly that all liver metastasis lesions displayed a reproducible, zon- ally delineated, pattern of functional and therapeutic biomarker heterogeneity. Peritumoral region featured elevated lipid metabolism and protein synthesis, the rim of the metastasis displayed increased cellular growth, movement and drug metabolism whereas the center of the lesion was characterized by elevated carbohydrate metabolism and DNA- repair activity. From the aspect of therapeutic targeting zonal expression of known and novel biomarkers was evident, reinforcing the need to select several targets in order to achieve optimal coverage of the lesion. Finally we highlight two novel antigens, LTBP2 and TGFBI, whose expression is a consistent feature of CRC liver metastasis. Conclusions : proteome heterogeneity has a distinct, organized, pattern. This particular hallmark can now be used as a part of the strategy for developing rational therapies based on multiple sets of targetable antigens. [less ▲]

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See detailTGF-B induced protein IG-H3 is essential for the growth of human liver metastases
Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Blomme, Arnaud; Delvenne, Philippe ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2014, March), 77(1), 05

Introduction : Transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein ig-h3 (TGFBI) is extracellular matrix component known to be important for cell-collagen interaction. We and others have reported elevated ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein ig-h3 (TGFBI) is extracellular matrix component known to be important for cell-collagen interaction. We and others have reported elevated expression of TGFBI in sev- eral human cancers, where its role remains controversial. Aim Current study aims at clarifying the function of TGFBI to date. Methods &Results : CRC-LM and in liver metastases originating from breast, lung and pancreatic tumors. We have next focused on func- tional aspects and have silenced TGFBI expression in SW1222 human colorectal carcinoma cells. The suppression of TGFBI protein led to a marked decrease in cell migration (-70%) and proliferation (-30%) in vitro. To study the effects in vivo we have developed a novel animal model of colorectal carcinoma based on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) that mimics human CRC-LM. TGFBI silencing resulted in 50% reduction of tumor volume in the CAM tumor model. Notably, the tumors displayed a marked inhibition of vascularization, suggesting an additional anti-angiogenic effect. Indeed, SW1222 cells silenced for TGFBI expression secreted lower levels of VEGFA in vitro. Finally, we have investigated if TGFBI can be used as systemically reachable target for antibody-drug delivery. For this purpose we have The in vivo data demonstrated that TGFBI is an accessible tumor target. Conclusions : Taken together, the present study shows that TGFBI is essential for promoting the development of CRC- LM and therefore represents a promising target for designing novel therapeutic approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailAccessibilome of human glioblastoma: collagen-VI-alpha-1 is a new target and a marker of poor outcome
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg; BIANCHI, Elettra ULg et al

in Journal of Proteome Research (2014), 13(12), 5660-5669

Functional targeted therapy has unfortunately failed to improve the outcome of glioblastoma patients. Success stories evidenced by the use of antibody-drug conjugates in other tumor types are encouraging ... [more ▼]

Functional targeted therapy has unfortunately failed to improve the outcome of glioblastoma patients. Success stories evidenced by the use of antibody-drug conjugates in other tumor types are encouraging, but targets specific to glioblastoma and accessible through the bloodstream remain scarce. In the current work, we have identified and characterized novel and accessible proteins using an innovative proteomic approach on six human glioblastomas; the corresponding data have been deposited in the PRIDE database identifier PXD001398. Among several clusters of uniquely expressed proteins, we highlight collagen-VI-alpha-1 (COL6A1) as a highly expressed tumor biomarker with low levels in most normal tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis of glioma samples from 61 patients demonstrated that COL6A1 is a significant and consistent feature of high-grade glioma. Deposits of COL6A1 were evidenced in the perivascular regions of the tumor-associated vasculature and in glioma cells found in pseudopalisade structures. Retrospective analysis of public gene-expression data sets from over 300 glioma patients demonstrated a significant correlation of poor patient outcome and high COL6A1 expression. In a proof-of-concept study, we use chicken chorioallantoic membrane in vivo model to show that COL6A1 is a reachable target for IV-injected antibodies. The present data warrant further development of human COL6A1 antibodies for assessing the quantitative biodistribution in the preclinical tumor models. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Anti-Tumor Effect of HDAC Inhibition in a Human Pancreas Cancer Model Is Significantly Improved by the Simultaneous Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase 2
Peulen, Olivier ULg; Gonzalez, Arnaud; Peixoto, Paul ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(9), 75102

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, with no satisfactory treatment to date. In this study, we tested whether the combined inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 ... [more ▼]

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, with no satisfactory treatment to date. In this study, we tested whether the combined inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) may results in a better control of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The impact of the concomitant HDAC and COX-2 inhibition on cell growth, apoptosis and cell cycle was assessed first in vitro on human pancreas BxPC-3, PANC-1 or CFPAC-1 cells treated with chemical inhibitors (SAHA, MS-275 and celecoxib) or HDAC1/2/3/7 siRNA. To test the potential antitumoral activity of this combination in vivo, we have developed and characterized, a refined chick chorioallantoic membrane tumor model that histologically and proteomically mimics human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The combination of HDAC1/3 and COX-2 inhibition significantly impaired proliferation of BxPC-3 cells in vitro and stalled entirely the BxPC-3 cells tumor growth onto the chorioallantoic membrane in vivo. The combination was more effective than either drug used alone. Consistently, we showed that both HDAC1 and HDAC3 inhibition induced the expression of COX-2 via the NF-kB pathway. Our data demonstrate, for the first time in a Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) model, a significant action of HDAC and COX-2 inhibitors on cancer cell growth, which sets the basis for the development of potentially effective new combinatory therapies for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo PET/CT in a human glioblastoma chicken chorioallantoic membrane model: A new tool for oncology and radiotracer development.
Warnock, Geoffrey; Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine (2013), 54(10), 1782-1788

For many years the laboratory mouse has been used as the standard model for in vivo oncology research, particularly in the development of novel PET tracers, but the growth of tumors on chicken ... [more ▼]

For many years the laboratory mouse has been used as the standard model for in vivo oncology research, particularly in the development of novel PET tracers, but the growth of tumors on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) provides a more rapid, low cost and ethically sustainable alternative. For the first time, we demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo PET and CT imaging in a U87 glioblastoma tumor model on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), with the aim of applying this model for screening of novel PET tracers. Methods: U87 glioblastoma cells were implanted on the CAM at day 11 post-fertilization and imaged at day 18. A small animal imaging cell was used to maintain incubation and allow anesthesia using isoflurane. Radiotracers were injected directly into the exposed CAM vasculature. Sodium [18F]fluoride was used to validate the imaging protocol, demonstrating that image-degrading motion can be removed with anesthesia. Tumor glucose metabolism was imaged using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and tumor protein synthesis was imaged using 2-[18F]fluoro-L-tyrosine. Anatomical images were obtained by contrast enhanced CT, facilitating clear delineation of the tumor, delineation of tracer uptake in tumor versus embryo and accurate volume measurements. Results: PET imaging of tumor glucose metabolism and protein synthesis was successfully demonstrated in the CAM U87 glioblastoma model. Catheterization of CAM blood vessels facilitated dynamic imaging of glucose metabolism with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and demonstrated the ability to study PET tracer uptake over time in individual tumors, while CT imaging improved the accuracy of tumor volume measurements. Conclusion: In summary, we describe the novel application of PET/CT in the CAM tumor model, with optimization of typical imaging protocols. PET imaging in this valuable tumor model could prove particularly useful for rapid, high-throughput screening of novel radiotracers. [less ▲]

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See detailConcomitant inhibition of class I HDAC and COX-2 exerts a antitumor effect in a human pancreatic cancer model
Gonzalez, Arnaud ULg; Peixoto, Paul ULg; Turtoi, Andrei ULg et al

Poster (2013, July 11)

- Introduction : Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Early-stage pancreatic cancer is usually clinically silent, and disease only ... [more ▼]

- Introduction : Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Early-stage pancreatic cancer is usually clinically silent, and disease only becomes apparent after the tumor invades surrounding tissues or metastatises to distant organs. Moreover, the current chemotherapeutic treatments have no or few effects on this type of cancer, increasing only slightly the median survival of the patients. The survival rate at 5-years is only 3%. There is a need to develop new effective therapies for PDAC patients together with a robust and fast in vivo model allowing drug screening. In this study, We tested whether the combined inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) may result in a better control of PDAC. We improved the formation of pancreatic tumor on Chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), an alternative to murine model. - Methods : The impact of the concomitant HDAC and COX-2 inhibition on cell growth, apoptosis and cell cycle was assessed in vitro on human pancreas BxPC-3 cells treated with chemical inhibitors (SAHA, MS-275 and celecoxib) or HDAC1/3/7 siRNA. To test the potential antitumoral activity of this combination in vivo, we improved, characterized and used model of pancreas tumors growing on chick chorioallantoic membrane. - Results : The inhibition of HDAC1/3 by SiRNA or MS-275 treatment reduced significantly the growth of BxPC-3 cells in vitro. Furthermore, we showed by QPCR and immunoblotting that both HDAC1 and HDAC3 inhibition induced the expression of COX-2 at least via the NF-kB pathway. Based on this observation, we decided to test the effect of MS-275 combined with celecoxib a COX-2 inhibitor. This combination was more effective then either drug used alone to reduce the growth of BxPC-3 cells. By FACS analysis we showed that MS-275/celecoxib combination decreased significantly the proportion of cells in S phase and increased significantly and drastically the proportion in G0/G1 at 24, 48 and 72h. By immunobloting this GO/G1 arrest was confirmed by accumulation of cell cycle repressors (P21, P27) and disappearance of hyper phosphorylated form of RB protein. Following a procedure development, we produced on CAM 60 mm3 functionally vascularized tumors mimicking human pancreatic tumors on CAM model. The clinical relevance of this model is supported by the CK7+/CK19+/CK20-/CEA+/Ki67+/CD56- immunolabeling. Recently we have discovered several novel biomarkers of human PDAC: MYOF, TGFBI, LTBP2. These antigens were expressed in tumors grown on CAM, reaffirming its clinical relevance. The concept of the co-treatment by MS-275 and celecoxib was validated using this model. We showed that celecoxib alone did not significantly reduce tumor growth. MS-275 alone decreased tumor growth by 50% and combination of celecoxib and MS-275 stalled entirely the tumor growth. - Conclusions : Our data demonstrate a significant synergic anti-tumoral action of HDAC and COX-2 inhibitors, which set a basis for the development of potentially effective new combinatory therapies for PDAC patients. [less ▲]

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