References of "Tunca, Daria"
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See detailThe Poetics of (In)visibility: A Stylistic Analysis of Caryl Phillips's Foreigners: Three English Lives
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (2017), 48(3-4), 159-186

Caryl Phillips’s multi-voiced texts have often been studied through the lens of Bakhtinian polyphony. In this essay, I focus on the volume of fictionalized biographies Foreigners: Three English Lives ... [more ▼]

Caryl Phillips’s multi-voiced texts have often been studied through the lens of Bakhtinian polyphony. In this essay, I focus on the volume of fictionalized biographies Foreigners: Three English Lives (2007) to demonstrate that the polyphonic nature of Phillips’s work resides not only in the structural confrontation of characters’ and narrators’ voices but also in the inscription of the writer’s own subjectivity within these individual discourses. Borrowing methods from the discipline of stylistics, I first focus on the use of adjectives and modality in the opening section of Foreigners, “Dr. Johnson’s Watch,” to establish how the first-person narrator’s gradual transition from tentativeness to self-confidence constitutes a way for the implied author, on the one hand, to expose the thwarted logic of the colonially-tinted discourse of his eighteenth-century narrator and, on the other, to offer larger reflections on the process of ideological encoding inherent in the writing of historiography. Such an investigation based on modality furthers allow me to challenge the critical consensus according to which the second section of the book, “Made in Wales,” is a straightforward factual account. Indeed, I suggest that the story of the rise and fall of mixed-race boxer Randolph Turpin is in fact a highly polyphonic narrative featuring increasingly marked clashes in modality and point of view. These, I argue, may draw attention precisely to the problematic construction of historiographical discourse deceptively made to appear so commonsense by the narrator of “Dr. Johnson’s Watch.” [less ▲]

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See detailIntersections on the "Map of Art": Metaphor in Ben Okri's Dangerous Love and Wilson Harris's The Mask of the Beggar
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Collier, Gordon; Davis, Geoffrey V.; Delrez, Marc (Eds.) et al The Cross-Cultural Legacy: Critical and Creative Writings in Memory of Hena Maes-Jelinek (2017)

Inspired by the work and legacy of Hena Maes-Jelinek, this essay proposes a parallel reading of Ben Okri’s Dangerous Love (1996) and Wilson Harris’s The Mask of the Beggar (2003), focusing on the novels’ ... [more ▼]

Inspired by the work and legacy of Hena Maes-Jelinek, this essay proposes a parallel reading of Ben Okri’s Dangerous Love (1996) and Wilson Harris’s The Mask of the Beggar (2003), focusing on the novels’ use of metaphor. More precisely, the article relies on conceptual metaphor theory to explore how these two Künstlerromane conceptualize the artistic development of their respective protagonists. It is argued that, while both novels use spatial metaphors to present art as a journey undertaken by their artist-hero, Okri privileges forward motion on the creative path, whereas Harris additionally foregrounds movement towards the travelling artist. In doing so, the Guyanese writer defeats readers’ instinctive search for a sense of direction on the “map of art,” a move that is emblematic of the elusive dialectic at the heart of his work. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Chika Unigwe Bibliography
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2017)

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See detailRepetition and Negation as Dialogic Devices in Caryl Phillips's "Northern Lights"
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2016, July 28)

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See detail"Living on the Edge of Death": Irony in Chris Abani's Song for Night
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2016, April 07)

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See detailGateways and Walls, or the Power and Pitfalls of Postcolonial Metaphors
Tunca, Daria ULiege; Wilson, Janet

in Wilson, Janet; Tunca, Daria (Eds.) Postcolonial Gateways and Walls: Under Construction (2016)

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See detailPostcolonial Gateways and Walls: Under Construction
Tunca, Daria ULiege; Wilson, Janet

Book published by Brill (2016)

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See detailAmericanah de Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Article for general public (2016)

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See detailIdentités et stéréotypes postcoloniaux
Dony, Christophe ULiege; Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege; Munos, Delphine ULiege et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailA Stylistic Analysis of Caryl Phillips's "Made in Wales"
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2015, September 07)

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See detailTowards an "African Stylistics": Apprehending Cross-Cultural Creativity in the Works of Chris Abani
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2015, July 18)

Anglophone African literatures have often been praised for their linguistic originality. More often than not, critics interested in the stylistic inventiveness of works from the continent have focused ... [more ▼]

Anglophone African literatures have often been praised for their linguistic originality. More often than not, critics interested in the stylistic inventiveness of works from the continent have focused their attention on these texts’ specifically “African” features, from the use of proverbs to the presence of words from indigenous languages. While these scholarly studies have done much to demonstrate the richness of African aesthetic standards, they have also tended to obscure other facets of the creativity of African writers who, just like their counterparts all over the world, make ample use of such devices as metaphor, irony, and unreliable narration. After a brief examination of the methodological and epistemological issues that have shaped the elusive field of “African stylistics”, I propose to investigate how contemporary stylistic theories may contribute to the understanding of the multiple forms of creativity found in the works of the US-based Nigerian writer Chris Abani. A self-proclaimed “global Igbo” (after the name of his father’s ethnic group), Abani boldly combines in his work African cosmology with influences from the Catholic and Buddhist traditions, also using formal devices – such as minor sentences and poetic metaphors – whose significance can only be fully appreciated through extensive stylistic analysis. Mainly focusing on Abani’s novella Becoming Abigail (2006), I will suggest that a combination of traditional culture-oriented approaches to African literatures and more typically “mainstream” stylistic techniques is needed to apprehend the Nigerian writer’s complex cross-cultural worldview. [less ▲]

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See detail"Only Questions, No Answers": Chris Abani's Dog Woman
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2015, June 05)

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See detailThe Power of a Singular Story: Narrating Africa and Its Diasporas
Tunca, Daria ULiege; Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege

in Research in African Literatures (2015), 46(4), 1-9

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See detailPostcolonial Thresholds: Gateways and Borders
Wilson, Janet; Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2015), 51(1), 1-6

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See detailWhat is Africa to me now?
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege; Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Research in African Literatures (2015), 46(4), 1-150

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See detailPostcolonial Thesholds: Gateways and Borders
Wilson, Janet; Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2015), 51(1), 1-107

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (5 ULiège)