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See detailTaking the vector vortex coronagraph to the next level for ground- and space-based exoplanet imaging instruments: review of technology developments in the USA, Japan, and Europe
Mawet, Dimitri; Murakami, Naoshi; Delacroix, Christian ULg et al

in Shaklan, Stuart (Ed.) Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets V. (2011, September 01)

The Vector Vortex Coronagraph (VVC) is one of the most attractive new-generation coronagraphs for ground- and space-based exoplanet imaging/characterization instruments, as recently demonstrated on sky at ... [more ▼]

The Vector Vortex Coronagraph (VVC) is one of the most attractive new-generation coronagraphs for ground- and space-based exoplanet imaging/characterization instruments, as recently demonstrated on sky at Palomar and in the laboratory at JPL, and Hokkaido University. Manufacturing technologies for devices covering wavelength ranges from the optical to the mid-infrared, have been maturing quickly. We will review the current status of technology developments supported by NASA in the USA (Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, University of Arizona, JDSU and BEAMCo), Europe (University of Li`ege, Observatoire de Paris- Meudon, University of Uppsala) and Japan (Hokkaido University, and Photonics Lattice Inc.), using liquid crystal polymers, subwavelength gratings, and photonics crystals, respectively. We will then browse concrete perspectives for the use of the VVC on upcoming ground-based facilities with or without (extreme) adaptive optics, extremely large ground-based telescopes, and space-based internal coronagraphs. [less ▲]

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See detailHST Far-Ultraviolet Imaging of Jupiter During the Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9
Clarke, John T; Prange, Renee; Ballester, Gilda E et al

in Science (1995), 267

Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended ... [more ▼]

Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended than at longer wavelengths, which indicates that ultraviolet-absorbing gases or aerosols are more extended, more absorbing, and at higher altitudes than the absorbers of visible light. Transient auroral emissions were observed near the magnetic conjugate point of the K impact site just after that impact. The global auroral activity was fainter than average during the impacts, and a variable auroral emission feature was observed inside the southern auroral oval preceding the impacts of fragments Q1 and Q2. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (4 ULg)