References of "Tran, Thi Hanh Tham"
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See detailIn vitro assessment of novel carbohydrates prebiotic potential in a co-inoculation model of the pig intestines
Tran, Thi Hanh Tham ULg; Boudry, Christelle; Everaert, Nadia ULg et al

in Book of Abstracts (2015)

Introduction: Innovative plant biomass fractionation methods produce new feed additives that could modulate the pig intestinal microbial population. Material and methods: Such novel indigestible ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Innovative plant biomass fractionation methods produce new feed additives that could modulate the pig intestinal microbial population. Material and methods: Such novel indigestible carbohydrates (CHO) were investigated for their prebiotic potential and their influence on Salmonella thyphimurium in a co-inocu¬lation in vitro fermentation model of the pig intestines. Inulin, cellobiose, pecto- (POS), iso-malto- (IMOS), xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS), and gluconic acid (GLU) were fermented by fecal microbes for 72h. Salmonella (7.3 log CFU/ml) were co-inoculated after 6h . Fer¬mentation kinetics was modeled and after 6, 12, 24 h, broth was analysed for short-chain fatty acid using HPLC and bacterial population using q-PCR. Results and discussion: Cellobiose was the fastest fermenting CHO followed by inulin and IMOS (P<0.01). After 6h, cellobiose yielded the highest SCFA production (684 mg/g) and lactate molar ratio (0.484). POS fermented slower. XOS and GLU were little fermented (150 and 175 mg SCFA/g after 24h). Nonetheless, GLU yielded the highest butyrate molar ratio (0.290 at 12h) (P<0.01). Although Salmonella counts did not differ, some CHO dis¬played obvious prebiotic properties, namely inulin and IMOS since they supported the highest growth of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations after 6 and 12h of fermen¬tation (8.18 to 8.56 log CFU/ml) (P<0.01). Cellobiose and GLU scored well for Lactobacilli too, but poorly for Bifidobacteria (6.41 to 6.92 log CFU/ml) (P<0.01). It is concluded that IMOS seem the most promising prebiotic but owing to their fermentation patterns yield¬ing high levels of lactate or butyrate, also cellobiose and GLU deserve further investigation in in vivo models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (2 ULg)
See detailA mucin-enriched fermentation model to assess prebiotic potential of new indigestible carbohydrates
Boudry, Christelle ULg; Tran, Thi Hanh Tham ULg; Blaise, Yannick ULg et al

in 64th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (2013, August 29)

Screening the prebiotic potential of novel indigestible carbohydrates (ICH) is a challenge for feed and food industry and in vitro models are increasingly used for such purposes. Recently extracellular ... [more ▼]

Screening the prebiotic potential of novel indigestible carbohydrates (ICH) is a challenge for feed and food industry and in vitro models are increasingly used for such purposes. Recently extracellular binding proteins responsible for the adherence to intestinal mucus were described for several Lactobacillus species. As this genus is known for its beneficial effect on gut health, we enriched the in vitro gas fermentation model with mucin in order to evaluate the prebiotic potential of 5 ICH. Mucin-coated microcosms (MCM) were prepared as described by Van den Abbeele et al. (2012, Microbial Biotechnology, 5, 106-115) and introduced in the fermentation bottles with an inoculum prepared from fresh faeces of 3 sows mixed with a nutritive buffer solution. Fermentation was performed at 39°C, using 200 mg of substrate, 30 ml of inoculum and 6 MCM, yielding approx. 20 mg mucin each, in 140 ml glass bottles. A first study was performed with inulin and cellulose as substrates, with and without mucus in the bottles. A second study was performed with 5 substrates (inulin, IMO, beet pulp POS, cellobiose and gluconate) in presence of mucus. After 8 and 72h, SCFA and the microflora of fermentation broth was analysed as well as the microflora on the MCM. The comparison of the microflora evolution with and without mucus showed a better development of the Lactobacillus in the fermentation broth, mainly in presence of inulin. The development of the Lactobacillus genus allowed the classification of the 5 substrates tested in the second study (Inulin > IMO > Gluconate > Cellobiose > POS)(P < 0.05) which was not possible without mucus (P > 0.05). Inulin and IMO showed also the highest development of Bifidobacteria (P < 0.05) and the highest levels of butyrate production (P < 0.05) compared to the three other substrates, indicating a high prebiotic potential. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (23 ULg)