References of "Torella, R"
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See detailDetection of early sympathetic cardiovascular neuropathy by squatting test in NIDDM.
Marfella, R.; Salvatore, T.; Giugliano, D. et al

in Diabetes Care (1994), 17(2), 149-51

OBJECTIVE--To determine the role of the squatting test in the detection of early sympathetic neuropathy in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS--Three ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE--To determine the role of the squatting test in the detection of early sympathetic neuropathy in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS--Three groups of nonsmoking, nonobese subjects were studied: 10 healthy subjects, 10 NIDDM patients without autonomic neuropathy (AN), and 10 NIDDM patients with AN defined by the presence of a pathological deep-breathing value. All subjects were given three postural tests: lying-to-standing, sitting-to-standing, and squatting test. Heart rate (HR) and finger arterial pressure were recorded with a noninvasive technique. RESULTS--Blood pressure (BP) fall (expressed as decremental area) was not significantly different among the groups at standing up after sitting or lying. By contrast, a significantly greater BP drop occurred in NIDDM patients with AN (1,123 +/- 245 mm2) compared with NIDDM patients without AN (460 +/- 232 mm2) or normal subjects (429 +/- 138 mm2, P < 0.001). The HR increase after all the orthostatic maneuvers was smaller in diabetic patients with AN (P < 0.01) compared with that recorded in other groups. Significant correlations were observed between BP fall after squatting and either the expiration:inspiration ratio at deep breathing (r = -0.77, P < 0.001) or the duration of diabetes (r = 0.76, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS--The intrinsic orthostatic load of the squatting test, which is greater than conventional postural maneuvers, makes the squatting test an easy and useful test to detect early orthostatic dysregulation in NIDDM. [less ▲]

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See detailPulsatile insulin delivery is more efficient than continuous infusion in modulating islet cell function in normal subjects and patients with type 1 diabetes.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Torella, R. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1988), 66(6), 1220-6

The respective modulating effects of continuous and intermittent insulin delivery on pancreatic islet cell function were studied in seven normal men and nine insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetic patients ... [more ▼]

The respective modulating effects of continuous and intermittent insulin delivery on pancreatic islet cell function were studied in seven normal men and nine insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetic patients. In the normal men, saline or continuous (0.8 mU kg-1 min-1) or pulsatile (5.2 mU kg-1 min-1, with a switching on/off length of 2/11 min) human insulin were delivered on different days and in random order. Despite hyperinsulinemia, blood glucose was kept close to its basal value by the glucose clamp technique. The diabetic patients also were infused in random order and on different days with either saline or a smaller amount of insulin delivered continuously (0.15 mU kg-1 min-1) or in a pulsatile manner (0.97 mU kg-1 min-1 for 2 min, followed by 11 min during which no insulin was infused). In all experiments, 5 g arginine were given iv as a bolus dose 30 min before the end of the study, and plasma C-peptide and glucagon levels were determined to assess islet cell function. In the normal men, insulin administration resulted in a significant decline of basal plasma glucagon and C-peptide levels and in a clear-cut decrease in the arginine-induced glucagon response. These effects of insulin were significantly more marked when insulin was delivered in a pulsatile rather than a continuous manner. In the insulin-dependent diabetic patients, the lower dose of insulin infused continuously did not alter the basal or arginine-stimulated glucagon response. In contrast, when the same amount of insulin was delivered intermittently, arginine-induced glucagon release was greatly reduced. Thus, these data support the concept that insulin per se is a potent physiological modulator of islet A- and B-cell function. Furthermore, they suggest that these effects of insulin are reinforced when the hormone is administered in an intermittent manner in an attempt to reproduce the pulsatile physiological release of insulin. [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired insulin-induced erythrocyte magnesium accumulation is correlated to impaired insulin-mediated glucose disposal in type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Giugliano, D. et al

in Diabetologia (1988), 31(12), 910-5

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in 12 healthy subjects and 12 moderately obese patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Basal ... [more ▼]

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in 12 healthy subjects and 12 moderately obese patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Basal plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients than in control subjects. In vitro incubation in the presence of 100 mU/l insulin significantly increased magnesium erythrocyte levels in both control subjects (p less than 0.001) and patients with diabetes (p less than 0.001). However, even in the presence of 100 mU/l insulin, the erythrocyte magnesium content of patients with Type 2 diabetes was lower than that of control subjects. The in vitro dose-response curve of the effect of insulin on magnesium erythrocyte accumulation was shifted to the right when red cells of diabetic patients were used, with a highly significant reduction of the maximal effect. Such reduction of the maximal effect of insulin suggests that the impairment of insulin-induced erythrocyte magnesium accumulation observed in Type 2 diabetic patients results essentially from a post-receptor defect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailProstaglandines, secretion d'insuline et diabete sucre.
Giugliano, D.; Torella, R.; Scheen, André ULg et al

in Diabète & Métabolisme (1988), 14(6), 721-7

The islets of Langerhans have the enzymatic equipment permitting the synthesis of the metabolites of arachidonic acid: cyclo-oxygenase and lipo-oxygenase. Numerous studies have shown that cyclo-oxygenase ... [more ▼]

The islets of Langerhans have the enzymatic equipment permitting the synthesis of the metabolites of arachidonic acid: cyclo-oxygenase and lipo-oxygenase. Numerous studies have shown that cyclo-oxygenase derivatives, mainly PGE2, reduce the insulin response to glucose whereas lipo-oxygenase derivatives, mainly 15-HPETE, stimulate insulin secretion. So, for instance, drugs that increase prostaglandins synthesis as colchicine or furosemide inhibit insulin secretion while non steroid anti-inflammator drugs, mainly salicylates, which inhibit cyclo-oxygenase, enhance the insulin response to various stimuli. In type-2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes, an increased sensitivity to endogenous prostaglandins has been proposed as a possible cause for the insulin secretion defect which characterizes this disease. Play in favor of this hypothesis the fact that the administration of PGE inhibits the insulin response to arginine in type-2 diabetics but not in normal subject and the fact that the administration of salicylates could improve the insulin response to glucose in some of these patients. [less ▲]

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