References of "Toléba, Seibou Soumanou"
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See detailSeasonal variations in the crop contents of scavenging Helmeted Guinea Fowls (Numida meleagris, L.) in Parakou (Benin).
Dahouda, M.; Toléba, Seibou Soumanou; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in British Poultry Science (2008), 49(6), 751-9

1. An experiment was carried out with 120 helmeted guinea fowls during one year in Parakou (Benin). Feed intake, ingredient and chemical composition, along with the nutritional adequacy of scavenging ... [more ▼]

1. An experiment was carried out with 120 helmeted guinea fowls during one year in Parakou (Benin). Feed intake, ingredient and chemical composition, along with the nutritional adequacy of scavenging diets were measured during the rainy season (November-February) and dry season (March-October) in order to propose supplementation strategies. Ingredients found in crops were identified and allocated into 6 main categories (supplemental feed, seeds, green forages, animal materials, mineral matter and unidentified materials). 2. Mean dry weights of crop contents were significantly higher in the rainy than in the dry season. Amounts and proportions of supplemental feed and seeds were not significantly different between seasons, whereas those of green forage, animal materials and mineral matter were higher in rainy season. Supplemental feed, especially maize and sorghum, was the largest component of the crop content in both seasons. The most represented grass seeds were Panicum maximum (rainy season) and Rottboellia cochinchinensis (dry season). 3. Dietary concentrations of organic matter, non-nitrogen extract and metabolisable energy were higher in the dry season, while mineral concentrations were higher in the rainy season. There were no significant differences between the two seasons in dry matter, crude protein or crude fibre. 4. Scavenging provided insufficient nutrients and energy to allow guinea fowls to be productive. Therefore, more nutritionally balanced supplementary feed would be required during both seasons. [less ▲]

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See detailComparaison des caractéristiques de production de la pintade locale (Meleagris numida) en station et dans le milieu villageois en zone soudano-guinéenne du Bénin
Dahouda, Mahamadou; Sènou, Marcel; Toléba, Seibou Soumanou et al

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2008), 20(12),

A survey on the production characteristics of guinea fowl (Meleagris numida) was carried out in the Borgou department located in the soudano-guinean zone North-Est of Benin. Chicks and reproductive groups ... [more ▼]

A survey on the production characteristics of guinea fowl (Meleagris numida) was carried out in the Borgou department located in the soudano-guinean zone North-Est of Benin. Chicks and reproductive groups were kept either on station under improved management conditions or in rural environment. In rural environment, the birds were divided in two groups. The birds pertaining to the first group were treated against parasitic diseases, whereas those in the second one (control group) received no treatment. Under station conditions, the feed conversion ratio and the daily weight gain were 8.8 and 5.7 g/day respectively. Mean body weight at six months of age were 1151g and 1085g for males and females, respectively. Sexual maturity was reached at 36 weeks of age. For mature hens kept on station, laying rate and the mean egg weight were 37.2% (65% at the peak) and 41.1g respectively. Smothering, stress and pricking were the major constraints to the cloistering of guinea fowl. In rural environment, the mean hatchability rate was 70%. Mortality rate and adult body weight were not significantly different between groups. Mortality rate observed in the rural environment was 50% for both treated or untreated birds. Apart from the parasitic affections, the main causes of mortality were the rain, the predators, the cold and the fragility of chicks. The mean body weight at six months of age is higher for the birds raised under village conditions in comparison to the birds kept on station. [less ▲]

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See detailGuinea fowl rearing constraints and flock composition under traditional management in Borgou Department, Benin
Dahouda, Mahamadou; Toléba, Seibou Soumanou; Youssao, A. K. I. et al

in Family Poultry (2007), 17(1&2), 3-14

A survey was conducted in Borgou department (northern Benin) to characterize Guinea fowl production systems in rural areas. A questionnaire was administered to 70 Guinea fowl keepers in order to collect ... [more ▼]

A survey was conducted in Borgou department (northern Benin) to characterize Guinea fowl production systems in rural areas. A questionnaire was administered to 70 Guinea fowl keepers in order to collect information about Guinea fowl management and husbandry practices in the region. This activity was practised according to traditional management in Benin where free range is the most common system of rearing. Birds scavenged during the day while at night, keets and surrogate hens were housed in poor, cramped coops whereas adult Guinea fowls roosted on trees. No rational feeding system was practised. Guinea fowls gleaned grass seeds, vegetable leaves, insects, worms, bones and eggshells. Poultry received a supplement consisting of cereals and their by-products, e.g. sorghum (30.4%), maize (25.0%), rice (14.3%), maize bran (7.1%), kitchen waste (5.4%), sorghum bran (3.6%), millet (1.8%) and complete food (1.8%). Adult body weight was 1121.3±100.2g at 6 months and maximum growth rate of 10.2g/day was reached at four months. Point-of-lay was between 7 and 9 months. Local hens were used to incubate Guinea fowl eggs, and hatchability was 72.9%. The survey revealed that Guinea fowl productivity is low because of high keet mortality. Average keet mortality registered from 0 to 6 months was 48% (range 3 to 100%). Moreover, 74% of interviewed farmers reported that keet mortality constituted the major constraint to Guinea fowl rearing. Others reported constraints, included keet weakness, poor quality of eggs, egg losses hidden under brush, keets predation, poor housing and infestations. The size of the keet populations varied over the year with the highest proportion in June-July while the proportion of growers increased from September to January. [less ▲]

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