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See detailWASP-44b, WASP-45b and WASP-46b: three short-period, transiting extrasolar planets
Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2012), 422(3), 1988

We report the discovery of three extrasolar planets that transit their moderately bright (Vmag = 12-13) host stars. WASP-44b is a 0.89-MJup planet in a 2.42-day orbit around a G8V star. WASP-45b is a 1.03 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of three extrasolar planets that transit their moderately bright (Vmag = 12-13) host stars. WASP-44b is a 0.89-MJup planet in a 2.42-day orbit around a G8V star. WASP-45b is a 1.03-MJup planet which passes in front of the limb of its K2V host star every 3.13 days. Weak Ca H+K emission seen in the spectra of WASP-45 suggests the star is chromospherically active. WASP-46b is a 2.10-MJup planet in a 1.43-day orbit around a G6V star. Rotational modulation of the light curves of WASP-46 and weak Ca H+K emission in its spectra show the star to be photospherically and chromospherically active. We imposed circular orbits in our analyses as the radial velocity data are consistent with (near-)circular orbits, as could be expected from both empirical and tidal-theory perspectives for such short-period, Jupiter-mass planets. We discuss the impact of fitting for eccentric orbits for these type of planets when not supported by the data. The derived planetary and stellar radii depend on the fitted eccentricity and further studies use these quantities in attempts to understand planet structure, the interdependence of parameters and the relevant physics for extrasolar planets. As such, we recommend exercising caution in fitting the orbits of short period, Jupiter-mass planets with an eccentric orbital model when there is no evidence of non-circularity. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-40b: Independent Discovery of the 0.6 M Transiting Exoplanet HAT-P-27b
Anderson, D. R.; Barros, S. C. C.; Boisse, I. et al

in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific [=PASP] (2011), 123

From WASP photometry and SOPHIE radial velocities we report the discovery of WASP-40b (HAT-P-27b), a 0.6 M planet that transits its 12th magnitude host star every 3.04 days. The host star is of late G ... [more ▼]

From WASP photometry and SOPHIE radial velocities we report the discovery of WASP-40b (HAT-P-27b), a 0.6 M planet that transits its 12th magnitude host star every 3.04 days. The host star is of late G-type or early K-type and likely has a metallicity greater than solar ([Fe/H]=0.14±0.11). The planet's mass and radius are typical of the known hot Jupiters, thus adding another system to the apparent pileup of transiting planets with periods near 3-4 days. Our parameters match those of the recent HATnet announcement of the same planet, thus giving confidence in the techniques used. We report a possible indication of stellar activity in the host star. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-30b: a 61 Mjup brown dwarf transiting a V=12, F8 star
Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Hellier, C. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2011), 726(2), 19

We report the discovery of a 61-Jupiter-mass brown dwarf (BD), which transits its F8V host star, WASP-30, every 4.16 days. From a range of age indicators we estimate the system age to be 1-2 Gyr. We ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a 61-Jupiter-mass brown dwarf (BD), which transits its F8V host star, WASP-30, every 4.16 days. From a range of age indicators we estimate the system age to be 1-2 Gyr. We derive a radius (0.89 ± 0.02 R Jup) for the companion that is consistent with that predicted (0.914 R Jup) by a model of a 1 Gyr old, non-irradiated BD with a dusty atmosphere. The location of WASP-30b in the minimum of the mass-radius relation is consistent with the quantitative prediction of Chabrier & Baraffe, thus confirming the theory. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-24 b: A New Transiting Close-in Hot Jupiter Orbiting a Late F-star
Street, R. A.; Simpson, E.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 720

We report the discovery of a new transiting close-in giant planet, WASP-24 b, in a 2.341 day orbit, 0.037 AU from its F8-9 type host star. By matching the star's spectrum with theoretical models, we infer ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a new transiting close-in giant planet, WASP-24 b, in a 2.341 day orbit, 0.037 AU from its F8-9 type host star. By matching the star's spectrum with theoretical models, we infer an effective temperature T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6075 ± 100 K and a surface gravity of log g = 4.15 ± 0.10. A comparison of these parameters with theoretical isochrones and evolutionary mass tracks places only weak constraints on the age of the host star, which we estimate to be 3.8[SUP]+1.3[/SUP] [SUB]-1.2[/SUB] Gyr. The planetary nature of the companion was confirmed by radial velocity measurements and additional photometric observations. These data were fit simultaneously in order to determine the most probable parameter set for the system, from which we infer a planetary mass of 1.071[SUP]+0.036[/SUP] [SUB]-0.038[/SUB] M [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and radius 1.3[SUP]+0.039[/SUP] [SUB]-0.037[/SUB] R [SUB]Jup[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-16b: A New Jupiter-Like Planet Transiting a Southern Solar Analog
Lister, T. A.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 703

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity spectroscopic data leads to a planet with R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.008 ± 0.071 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.855 ± 0.059 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], orbiting a host star with R [SUB]*[/SUB] = 0.946 ± 0.054 R [SUB]sun[/SUB] and M [SUB]*[/SUB] = 1.022 ± 0.101 M [SUB]sun[/SUB]. Comparison of the high resolution stellar spectrum with synthetic spectra and stellar evolution models indicates the host star is a near-solar metallicity ([Fe/H] =0.01 ± 0.10) solar analog (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5700 ± 150 K and log g = 4.5 ± 0.2) of intermediate age (tau = 2.3[SUP]+5.8[/SUP] [SUB]--2.2[/SUB] Gyr). [less ▲]

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See detailWasp-7: A Bright Transiting-Exoplanet System in the Southern Hemisphere
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 690

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest ... [more ▼]

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest transiting-exoplanet system in the southern hemisphere. WASP-7b is among the densest of the known Jupiter-mass planets, suggesting that it has a massive core. The planet mass is 0.96[SUP]+0.12[/SUP] [SUB]--0.18[/SUB] M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], the radius is 0.915[SUP]+0.046[/SUP] [SUB]--0.040[/SUB] R [SUB]Jup[/SUB], and the density is 1.26[SUP]+0.25[/SUP] [SUB]--0.21[/SUB] rho[SUB]Jup[/SUB] (1.67[SUP]+0.33[/SUP] [SUB]--0.28[/SUB] g cm[SUP]--3[/SUP]). [less ▲]

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