References of "Tirelli, Ezio"
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See detailDifferential effects of context on psychomotor sensitization to ethanol and cocaine
Didone, Vincent ULg; Quoilin, Caroline; Dieupart, Julie et al

in Behavioural Pharmacology (in press)

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See detailExploration of volumetric cerebral changes, with de micro-MRi, due to psychomotor exercise in mice
Moës, Florian ULg; Plenevaux, Alain ULg; Becker, Guillaume ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

It's well know that exercise is good for health .In addition exercise has postive effects on cognition ,neurodegenerative disease and on mood. Some studies show that exercise has effect on brain so the ... [more ▼]

It's well know that exercise is good for health .In addition exercise has postive effects on cognition ,neurodegenerative disease and on mood. Some studies show that exercise has effect on brain so the aim of this study is to see if there are volumetric changes due to exercise or not. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of α-synuclein levels on cerebral synaptic function: Validation of a novel PET radioligand for the early diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease
Tarragon Cros, Ernesto ULg; Ferrara, André ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

Background In Parkinson’s disease, converging evidence supports a pathogenic role for excessive α–synuclein accumulation in synaptic terminals that may propagate back to the soma of vulnerable nerve cells ... [more ▼]

Background In Parkinson’s disease, converging evidence supports a pathogenic role for excessive α–synuclein accumulation in synaptic terminals that may propagate back to the soma of vulnerable nerve cells such as neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The resulting loss of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum can be demonstrated in vivo using 18F-Dopa-PET (positron emission tomography). However, there’s currently no validated biomarker of the progressive synaptic dysfunction in other vulnerable areas such as the cerebral cortex. Goal In this longitudinal study, we will test the hypothesis that the loss of synaptic terminals in a mouse model of excessive α–synuclein accumulation can be demonstrated in vivo before the occurrence of behavioural disturbances using 18F-UCB-H, a new PET biomarker developed at CRC. We will also test if this new imaging modality is sensitive enough to study the effect of a disease modifying therapy such as chronic physical exercise. Methods We will use microPET for the in vivo quantification of 18F-UCB-H brain uptake in 16 wild type animals and 16 transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing human α–syn under the mThy1 promotor every 2 months. Data will be validated against post-mortem analyses after the last PET study. Predictions We predict decreased tracer uptake over time in the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex in Tg mice as compared with WT animals. Also, we predict a relationship between 18F-UCB-H uptake levels in basal ganglia and cerebral cortex and progressive alterations in both motor and cognitive functions, respectively. Further, we also expect that chronic exercise will slow down both motor and cognitive disturbances, as well as the rate of 18F-UCB-H brain uptake decreases. Conclusion If 18F-UCB-H PET proves to be a valid biomarker for the early detection of α–synuclein accumulation in the pre-clinical model of PD, the methods will tested on human clinical populations. [less ▲]

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See detailHigher long-lasting ethanol sensitization after adolescent ethanol exposure in mice
Quoilin, Caroline; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Psychopharmacology (2014), 231

Rationale. Due to their maturing brain, adolescents are suggested to be more vulnerable to the long-term consequences of chronic alcohol use. Increased sensitization to the stimulant effects of ethanol is ... [more ▼]

Rationale. Due to their maturing brain, adolescents are suggested to be more vulnerable to the long-term consequences of chronic alcohol use. Increased sensitization to the stimulant effects of ethanol is a possible consequence of ethanol exposure during adolescence. Objectives. The aim of this study was to characterize the long-term alterations in the stimulant effects of ethanol and in the rate of ethanol sensitization in mice pre-exposed to ethanol during adolescence in comparison to mice pre-exposed to ethanol in adulthood. Methods. Adolescent and adult female SWISS mice were injected with saline or ethanol (2.5 or 4 g/kg) during 14 consecutive days. After a three weeks period of ethanol abstinence, mice were tested as adults before and after a second exposure to daily repeated ethanol injections. Results. All mice pre-exposed to ethanol as adults or adolescents showed higher stimulant effects when re-exposed to ethanol three weeks later. However, this enhanced sensitivity to the stimulant effects of ethanol was of significantly higher magnitude in mice repeatedly injected with high ethanol doses (4g/kg) during adolescence. Furthermore, the increased expression of ethanol stimulant effects in these mice was maintained even after a second procedure of ethanol sensitization. Conclusions. Adolescence is a critical period for the development of a sensitization to ethanol stimulant properties providing that high intermittent ethanol doses are administered. These results might contribute to explain the relationship between age at first alcohol use and risks of later alcohol problems and highlight the dangers of repeated consumption of high alcohol amounts in young adolescents. [less ▲]

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See detailAmphetamine reward in food restricted mice lacking the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor-1
Geuzaine, A; Tyhon, A; Grisar, Thierry ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2014), 262

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See detailLong-term protective effect of wheel-running on cocaine reactivity
Lespine, Louis-Ferdinand ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

Poster (2013, September)

Chronic running activity performed during adolescence in C57BL/6J mice induce a protective long term effect on psycho-stimulating effect of cocaine

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See detailThe histamine H3-receptor inverse agonist Pitolisant improves fear memory in mice
Brabant, Christian ULg; Charlier, Yana ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2013), 243

Numerous studies have demonstrated that brain histamine plays a crucial role in learning and memory and histamine H3 receptor inverse agonists (H3R inverse agonists) have been proposed to treat cognitive ... [more ▼]

Numerous studies have demonstrated that brain histamine plays a crucial role in learning and memory and histamine H3 receptor inverse agonists (H3R inverse agonists) have been proposed to treat cognitive disorders. Pitolisant (BF2.649, 1-{3-[3-(4-chlorophenyl)propoxy]propyl}piperidine, hydrochloride) was the first H3R inverse agonist that has been tested in human trials and is well tolerated. The present study investigated whether Pitolisant (0.625–20 mg/kg, i.p.) improves consolidation and reconsolidation processes in the fear conditioning task in female C57BL/6J mice. We also tested whether Pitolisant reverses memory deficits induced by the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801). Our results indicate that post-training systemic injections of Pitolisant facilitated consolidation of contextual fear memory and reversed amnesia induced by an i.p. injection of 0.12 mg/kg dizocilpine. In addition, none of the doses of Pitolisant we have tested after reactivation (reexposure to the context in which training took place 48 h earlier) affected reconsolidation, whereas dizocilpine disrupted it. However, Pitolisant was able to reverse the deficit in reconsolidation induced by 0.12 mg/kg dizocilpine. The present results are the first demonstration that Pitolisant is effective in improving consolidation processes in the fear condition task and add further evidence to its potential for treating cognitive disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic tolerance to ethanol-induced sedation: Implication for age-related differences in locomotor sensitization
Quoilin, Caroline; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Alcohol (2013), 47(4), 317-322

The adolescent brain has been suggested to be particularly sensitive to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations, which in turn could increase the risk of youths for alcohol abuse and dependence. Sensitization to ... [more ▼]

The adolescent brain has been suggested to be particularly sensitive to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations, which in turn could increase the risk of youths for alcohol abuse and dependence. Sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol has often been used as an animal model of ethanol-induced neuroadaptations. Previously, we showed that young mice were more sensitive than adults to the locomotor sensitization induced by high ethanol doses. However, this effect could be due to age-related differences in chronic tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol. The aim of the present study is to assess chronic tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol in weaning 21-day-old (P21), adolescent 35-day-old (P35) and adult 63-day-old (P63) female Swiss mice. After a daily injection of saline or 4 g/kg ethanol during 6 consecutive days, all P21, P35 and P63 mice were injected with 4 g/kg ethanol and submitted to the loss of righting reflex procedure. Our results confirm that the sensitivity to the acute sedative effects of ethanol gradually increases with age. Although this schedule of ethanol injections induces significant age-related differences in ethanol sensitization, it did not reveal significant differences between P21, P35 and P63 mice in the development of a chronic ethanol tolerance to its sedative effects. The present results show that age-related differences in the development of ethanol sensitization cannot be explained by differences in chronic ethanol tolerance to its sedative effects. More broadly, they do not support the idea that ethanol-induced sensitization is a by-product of chronic ethanol tolerance. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental enrichment can accentuate condtioned reward induced by representative cocaine doses in mice
Geuzaine, Annabelle ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Journal of Psychopharmacology (2012, August), 26(8), 70

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See detailChronic ethanol exposure during adolescence alters the behavioral responsiveness to ethanol in adult mice
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2012), 229

Alcohol exposure during early adolescence is believed to durably alter the behavioral properties of ethanol, increasing the likelihood of later alcohol-related disorders. The aim of the present ... [more ▼]

Alcohol exposure during early adolescence is believed to durably alter the behavioral properties of ethanol, increasing the likelihood of later alcohol-related disorders. The aim of the present experiments was to characterize changes in the behavioral effects of ethanol in adult female Swiss mice after a chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence, extending from postnatal day 28 to postnatal day 42. After a chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence (daily injections of 0, 2.5 or 4 g/kg ethanol for 14 consecutive days), adult mice were tested at postnatal day 63. The locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol, together with ethanol sensitization were tested in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the sedative effects of ethanol were assessed with the loss of righting reflex procedure. Finally, in experiment 3, the anxiolytic effects of ethanol were tested with the light/dark box test. Adult mice chronically exposed to ethanol during adolescence showed a lower basal locomotor activity, but higher locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol than non-exposed mice. Additionally, these adult mice developed higher rates of ethanol sensitization after chronic re-exposure to ethanol in adulthood. Adult mice exposed to ethanol during adolescence also had a stronger tolerance to the sedative effects of high ethanol doses, although they showed no evidence of changes in the anxiolytic effects of ethanol. These results are in agreement with the thesis that chronic alcohol consumption during adolescence, especially in high amounts, increases the risk of later alcohol-related disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopmental differences in ethanol-induced sensitization using postweanling, adolescent, and adult Swiss mice
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Psychopharmacology (2012), 219

Rationale: The maturing adolescent brain has been suggested to be more sensitive than the adult brain to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations. In animal studies, sensitization to the stimulant effects of ... [more ▼]

Rationale: The maturing adolescent brain has been suggested to be more sensitive than the adult brain to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations. In animal studies, sensitization to the stimulant effects of ethanol is used to study the vulnerability to chronic ethanol-induced neurobehavioral alterations. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to systematically characterize age-dependent changes in the development and expression of the sensitization to the stimulant effects of a range of ethanol doses in female Swiss mice. Three ages were studied: 21-day-old mice (postweanlings), 35-day-old mice (adolescents), and 63-day-old mice (adults). Methods: Postweanling, adolescent, and adult mice were daily injected with saline or various ethanol doses (1.5 to 4 g/kg) for 7 days. They were then tested for acute and sensitized locomotor activity. Results: Postweanling and adolescent mice were more sensitive than adult mice to the acute stimulant effects of ethanol. In adult mice, daily injections of ethanol at doses between 2.5 and 4 g/kg led to significant sensitization. Higher ethanol doses (3.5 and 4 g/kg) were required to induce sensitization in postweanling and adolescent mice. However, younger mice showed ethanol sensitization of higher magnitude. Conclusions: Young mice develop very strong ethanol sensitization at doses that mimic binge drinking in humans. These results might explain why early ethanol drinking during adolescence is related to a higher prevalence of subsequent alcohol disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailSpécificité et propriétés interactives des motivations incitatrices : le rôle de la cognition
Anselme, Patrick ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Psychologie Française (2012), 57(3), 175-191

La motivation incitatrice est un processus psychologique qui augmente l’attractivité des sources de récompense (nourriture, sexe, drogue, etc.) et qui a pour effet de diriger le comportement vers ces ... [more ▼]

La motivation incitatrice est un processus psychologique qui augmente l’attractivité des sources de récompense (nourriture, sexe, drogue, etc.) et qui a pour effet de diriger le comportement vers ces stimuli – et à l’opposé des événements aversifs. Que se passe-t-il lorsque l’expression d’une motivation est contrecarrée ou que deux motivations antagonistes entrent en conflit ? La plupart des modèles théoriques destinés à expliquer les interactions motivationnelles postulent l’existence d’obscurs mécanismes physiologiques sans investiguer la composante psychologique de ces interactions. Cet article a pour objectif de montrer qu’une théorie motivationnelle peut seulement offrir un cadre interprétatif cohérent des interactions entre motivations incitatrices, et de ces motivations elles-mêmes, à condition d’intégrer certaines variables cognitives – en particulier, l’anticipation et l’attention. Cette approche offre une interprétation des activités de déplacement mieux en accord avec les observations. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]fallypride binding in the mouse brain: test-retest and effects of registration
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Geuzaine, Annabelle ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg et al

Conference (2011, January 17)

The quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with PET tracer experiments is an intricate and challenging problem especially for small animals such as rats and mice. A test-retest scan is usually set up ... [more ▼]

The quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with PET tracer experiments is an intricate and challenging problem especially for small animals such as rats and mice. A test-retest scan is usually set up in order to confirm an observed experimental effect or to examine the reliability of the experiment design. Inadequate processing of the image data may also mask small effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of image registration on [18F]fallypride binding potentials calculated from PET mouse test-retest data. Sub-optimal registration affected the quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with [18F]fallypride. The absence of anatomical information in the [18F]fallypride image and the lack of a homogeneous tracer distribution, even during the earlier minutes of the scan, lead to erroneous automatic registration. A FDG scan after each [18F]fallypride test could improve registration as FDG provides a more homogeneous brain image. Variability in the data could also result from stress induced by anaesthesia or the experimental environment. [less ▲]

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See detailDo excitatory and inhibitory conditioning processes underlie psychomotor sensitization to amphetamine? An analysis using simple and multiple regressions
Brabant, Christian ULg; Tambour, Sophie; Quertemont, Etienne ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2011), 221

Excitatory or inhibitory conditioning processes have been proposed to account for the context-dependent establishment of amphetamine psychomotor sensitization in rodents. The purpose of this study was to ... [more ▼]

Excitatory or inhibitory conditioning processes have been proposed to account for the context-dependent establishment of amphetamine psychomotor sensitization in rodents. The purpose of this study was to test the predictions of these theories in mice. We first assessed the consequence of the extinction of post-sensitization conditioned activity (CR) on the ulterior expression of sensitization. We also assessed the relations between several measures of sensitization and conditioned hyperactivity revealed on a saline challenge using simple and multiple regression analyses. Context-dependent sensitization was induced via 7 amphetamine injections in the test context given alternately with 7 saline injections in another context in paired mice, unpaired mice receiving the converse pretreatment. Context-dependent sensitization (drug challenge) and the CR (saline challenge) were revealed subsequently. After CR extinction (over 7 every-other-day repetition of the saline challenge), mice were tested again for context-dependent sensitization. Against the excitatory conditioning model, CR extinction spared context-dependent sensitization in paired mice, and regression analyses revealed no significant correlations between the size of the CR and several measures of sensitization. In apparent agreement with the inhibitory conditioning model, unpaired mice expressed higher levels of sensitization in the test context after extinction than before. However, regression analyses did not indicate that activity on the saline challenge was related to measures of sensitization in unpaired mice. Therefore, the present results support neither the excitatory nor the inhibitory conditioning models of context-dependent sensitization, but remain compatible with theories proposing that other inhibitory mechanisms modulate sensitization. [less ▲]

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