References of "Timmermann, A"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVariability in North Pacific intermediate and deep water ventilation during Heinrich events in two coupled climate models
Chikamoto, M. O.; Menviel, L.; Abe-Ouchi, A. et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2012), 61-64

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRemoving the North Pacific halocline: effects on global climate, ocean circulation and the carbon cycle
Menviel, L.; Timmermann, A.; Timm, O. et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2012), 61-64

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDetecting regional anthropogenic trends in ocean acidification against natural variability
Friedrich, T.; Timmermann, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A. et al

in Nature Climate Change (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDeconstructing the Last Glacial Termination: the role of millennial and orbital-scale forcings
Menviel, L.; Timmermann, A.; Timm, O. et al

in Quaternary Science Reviews (2011), 30

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe effect of topography-enhanced diapycnal mixing on ocean and atmospheric circulation and marine biogeochemistry
Friedrich, T.; Timmermann, A.; Decloedt, T. et al

in Ocean Modelling (2011), 3-4

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClimate and biogeochemical response to a rapid melting of the West-Antarctic Ice Sheet during interglacials and implications for future climate
Menviel, L.; Timmermann, A.; Timm, O. et al

in Paleoceanography (2010), 25

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDescription of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.2
Goosse, H.; Brovkin, V.; Fichefet, T. et al

in Geoscientific Model Development (2010), 3(2), 603-633

The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the ... [more ▼]

The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the atmosphere, the ocean and sea ice, the land surface (including vegetation), the ice sheets, the icebergs and the carbon cycle. The atmospheric component is ECBilt2, a T21, 3-level quasi-geostrophic model. The ocean component is CLIO3, which consists of an ocean general circulation model coupled to a comprehensive thermodynamic-dynamic sea-ice model. Its horizontal resolution is of 3° by 3°, and there are 20 levels in the ocean. ECBilt-CLIO is coupled to VECODE, a vegetation model that simulates the dynamics of two main terrestrial plant functional types, trees and grasses, as well as desert. VECODE also simulates the evolution of the carbon cycle over land while the ocean carbon cycle is represented by LOCH, a comprehensive model that takes into account both the solubility and biological pumps. The ice sheet component AGISM is made up of a three-dimensional thermomechanical model of the ice sheet flow, a visco-elastic bedrock model and a model of the mass balance at the ice-atmosphere and ice-ocean interfaces. For both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, calculations are made on a 10 km by 10 km resolution grid with 31 sigma levels. LOVECLIM1.2 reproduces well the major characteristics of the observed climate both for present-day conditions and for key past periods such as the last millennium, the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum. However, despite some improvements compared to earlier versions, some biases are still present in the model. The most serious ones are mainly located at low latitudes with an overestimation of the temperature there, a too symmetric distribution of precipitation between the two hemispheres, and an overestimation of precipitation and vegetation cover in the subtropics. In addition, the atmospheric circulation is too weak. The model also tends to underestimate the surface temperature changes (mainly at low latitudes) and to overestimate the ocean heat uptake observed over the last decades. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDeep Water Formation in the North Pacific during the Last Glacial Termination
Okazaki, Y.; Timmermann, A.; Menviel, L. et al

in Science (2010), 329

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe mechanism behind internally generated centennial-to-millennial scale climate variability in an earth system model of intermediate complexity
Friedrich, T.; Timmermann, A.; Menviel, L. et al

in Geoscientific Model Development (2010), 3(2), 377--389

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
See detailBiogeochemical changes in the North Pacific in response to a shut down of the Atlantic meridional overturning
Menviel, L.; Timmermann, A.; Timm, O. et al

Conference (2009, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClimate and marine carbon cycle response to changes in the strength of the Southern Hemispheric westerlies
Menviel, L.; Timmermann, A.; Mouchet, Anne ULg et al

in Paleoceanography (2008), 23(4),

It has been previously suggested that changes in the strength and position of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies could be a key contributor to glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. To test this ... [more ▼]

It has been previously suggested that changes in the strength and position of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies could be a key contributor to glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. To test this hypothesis, we perform a series of sensitivity experiments using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. A strengthening of the climatological mean surface winds over the Southern Ocean induces stronger upwelling and increases the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water. Enhanced Ekman pumping brings more dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)-rich waters to the surface. However, the stronger upwelling also supplies more nutrients to the surface, thereby enhancing marine export production in the Southern Hemisphere and decreasing the DIC content in the euphotic zone. The net response is a small atmospheric CO2 increase (similar to 5 ppmv) compared to the full glacial-interglacial CO2 amplitude of similar to 90 ppmv. Roughly the opposite results are obtained for a weakening of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeridional reorganizations of marine and terrestrial productivity during Heinrich events,
Menviel, L.; Timmermann, A.; Mouchet, Anne ULg et al

in Paleoceanography (2008), 23

To study the response of the global carbon cycle to a weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a series of freshwater perturbation experiments is conducted both under ... [more ▼]

To study the response of the global carbon cycle to a weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a series of freshwater perturbation experiments is conducted both under preindustrial and glacial conditions using the earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM. A shutdown of the AMOC leads to substantial cooling of the North Atlantic, a weak warming of the Southern Hemisphere, intensification of the northeasterly trade winds, and a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Trade wind anomalies change upwelling in the tropical oceans and hence marine productivity. Furthermore, hydrological changes associated with a southward displacement of the ITCZ lead to a reduction of terrestrial carbon stocks mainly in northern Africa and northern South America in agreement with paleoproxy data. In the freshwater perturbation experiments the ocean acts as a sink of CO2, primarily through increased solubility. The net atmospheric CO2 anomaly induced by a shutdown of the AMOC amounts to about +15 ppmv and −10 ppmv for preindustrial and glacial conditions, respectively. This background state dependence can be explained by the fact that the glacial climate is drier and the terrestrial vegetation therefore releases a smaller amount of carbon to the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the net CO2 response to large-scale ocean circulation changes has significant contributions both from the terrestrial and marine carbon cycle. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 ULg)