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See detailDrivers of inorganic carbon dynamics in first-year sea ice: A model study.
Moreau, Sebastien; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Oceans (2014)

Sea ice is an active source or a sink for carbon dioxide (CO2), although to what extent is not clear. Here, we analyze CO2 dynamics within sea ice using a one-dimensional halo-thermodynamic sea ice model ... [more ▼]

Sea ice is an active source or a sink for carbon dioxide (CO2), although to what extent is not clear. Here, we analyze CO2 dynamics within sea ice using a one-dimensional halo-thermodynamic sea ice model including gas physics and carbon biogeochemistry. The ice-ocean fluxes and vertical transport of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) are represented using fluid transport equations. [less ▲]

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See detailCO2 and CH4 in sea ice from a subarctic fjord under influence of riverine input
Crabeck, O.; Delille, Bruno ULg; Thomas, David et al

in Biogeosciences (2014), 11(23), 6525--6538

We present the CH4 concentration [CH4], the par- tial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and the total gas content in bulk sea ice from subarctic, land-fast sea ice in the Kapisillit fjord, Greenland. Fjord systems ... [more ▼]

We present the CH4 concentration [CH4], the par- tial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and the total gas content in bulk sea ice from subarctic, land-fast sea ice in the Kapisillit fjord, Greenland. Fjord systems are characterized by freshwater runoff and riverine input and based on $\delta$18O data, we show that >30\% of the surface water originated from periodic river input during ice growth. This resulted in fresher sea-ice layers with higher gas content than is typical from marine sea ice. The bulk ice [CH4] ranged from 1.8 to 12.1 nmolL−1, which corresponds to a partial pressure ranging from 3 to 28ppmv. This is markedly higher than the average atmo- spheric methane content of 1.9ppmv. Evidently most of the trapped methane within the icewas contained inside bubbles, and only a minor portion was dissolved in the brines. The bulk ice pCO2 ranged from 60 to 330ppmv indicating that sea ice at temperatures above −4 ◦C is undersaturated com- pared to the atmosphere (390 ppmv). This study adds to the few existing studies of CH4 and CO2 in sea ice, and we con- clude that subarctic seawater can be a sink for atmospheric CO2, while being a net source of CH4. [less ▲]

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See detailSea ice contribution to the air-sea CO2 exchange in the Arctic and Southern Oceans
Rysgaard, Søren; Bendtsen; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

in Tellus : Series B (2011), 63(5), 823-830

Although salt rejection from sea ice is a key process in deep-water formation in ice-covered seas, the concurrent rejection of CO2 and the subsequent effect on air–sea CO2 exchange have received little ... [more ▼]

Although salt rejection from sea ice is a key process in deep-water formation in ice-covered seas, the concurrent rejection of CO2 and the subsequent effect on air–sea CO2 exchange have received little attention. We review the mechanisms by which sea ice directly and indirectly controls the air–sea CO2 exchange and use recent measurements of inorganic carbon compounds in bulk sea ice to estimate that oceanic CO2 uptake during the seasonal cycle of sea-ice growth and decay in ice-covered oceanic regions equals almost half of the net atmospheric CO2 uptake in ice-free polar seas. This sea-ice driven CO2 uptake has not been considered so far in estimates of global oceanic CO2 uptake. Net CO2 uptake in sea-ice–covered oceans can be driven by; (1) rejection during sea–ice formation and sinking of CO2-rich brine into intermediate and abyssal oceanic water masses, (2) blocking of air–sea CO2 exchange during winter, and (3) release of CO2-depleted melt water with excess total alkalinity during sea-ice decay and (4) biological CO2 drawdown during primary production in sea ice and surface oceanic waters. [less ▲]

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See detailTemporal evolution of decaying summer first-year sea ice in the Western Weddell Sea, Antarctica
Tison, J. L.; Worby, A.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2008), 55(8-9), 975-987

The evolution of the main physico-chemical properties of the unflooded 90-cm-thick first-year sea-ice cover at the Ice Station POLarstern (ISPOL) "clean site" is described. ISPOL was an international ... [more ▼]

The evolution of the main physico-chemical properties of the unflooded 90-cm-thick first-year sea-ice cover at the Ice Station POLarstern (ISPOL) "clean site" is described. ISPOL was an international experiment of the German research icebreaker R.V. Polarstern. The vessel was anchored to an ice floe for an observation period of 5 weeks, during the early summer melt onset in the Western Weddell Sea. The "clean site" was specially designed and accessed so as to prevent any trace metal contamination of the sampling area. Observations were made at 5-day intervals during December 2004 in the central part of the main floe. Results show the succession of two contrasting phases in the behavior of the brine network (brine channels, pockets, and tubes). Initially, brine salinity was higher than that of sea-water, leading to brine migration and a decrease in the mean bulk salinity of the ice cover. This process is highly favored by the already high bulk porosity (14%), which ensures full connectivity of the brine network. Gravity drainage rather than convection seems to be the dominant brine transfer process. Half-way through the observation period, the brine salinity became lower than that of the sea-water throughout the ice column. The brine network therefore switched to a "stratified" regime in which exchange with sea-water was limited to molecular diffusion, strongly stabilizing the bulk mean sea-ice salinity. During the transition between the two regimes, and in areas closer to ridges, slush water (resulting from a mixture of snow meltwater and sea water accumulated at the snow-ice interface) penetrated through the growing "honeycomb-like structure" and replaced the downward draining brines. This resulted in a slight local replenishment of nutrients (as indicated by dissolved silicic acid). However, as a whole, the described decaying regime in this globally unflooded location with limited snow cover should be unfavorable to the development of healthy and active surface and internal microbial communities. The switch from gravity to diffusion controlled transport mechanisms within the ice column also should affect the efficiency of gas exchange across the sea-ice cover. The observed late build-up of a continuous, impermeable, superimposed ice layer should further significantly hamper gas exchange. Statistical estimates of the evolution of the ice thickness during the observation period and salinity trends of the under-ice water salinity down to 30m corroborate model predictions of a moderate bottom melting (5-10cm) from ocean heat fluxes. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA comparative study of O2 measurements in experimental (Interice II) and natural (ISPOL, Western Weddell Sea, Antarctica) first-year sea ice
Tison, Jean-Louis; Mock, T.; Thomas, David et al

Poster (2006, December)

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