References of "Thiry, Etienne"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailEcology of mosquitoes (Diptera, Culicidae) potentially vectors of arboviruses according to the kinds of animal husbandry in Belgium
Boukraa, Slimane ULg; De la Grandière de Noronha Cotta, Maria Ana ULg; Bawin, Thomas ULg et al

Poster (2013, November 12)

Human activity, commercial exchanges and climate changes current and future, could favor the (re)-emergence of vector-borne diseases, by inducing changes on Culicidae populations. This study aims to ... [more ▼]

Human activity, commercial exchanges and climate changes current and future, could favor the (re)-emergence of vector-borne diseases, by inducing changes on Culicidae populations. This study aims to determine the potential importance of agricultural environments, especially cattle farms and equestrian, to welcome and favor the proliferation of some species of mosquito responsible for transmission of arboviruses. To better understand the structure of the Culicidae population and identify habitats favorable to the development of each species, a taxonomic inventory was conducted in 2008 (III, VI and X) and 2009 (V and IX) in ten cattle farms, and in 2011 (VI-X) and 2012 (VI-IX) in six equestrian farms located in Belgium. The harvest of mosquitoes is based on adult trapping by CO2-traps (Mosquito magnet) and on larval sampling at the level of 64 biotopes such as water troughs, used tires, abandoned utensils and temporary puddles or not. The morphotaxonomic of larvae and genitalia, and molecular study showed the presence of 15 species: Culiseta annulata Schrank, 1776; Cs. morsitans Theobald, 1901 Anopheles claviger s.s. Meigen, 1804; An. maculipennis s.s. Meigen, 1818; An. messeae Falleroni, 1926; An. plumbeus Stephens, 1828; Culex pipiens molestus Forskal, 1775; Cx. pipiens pipiens L., 1758; Cx. torrentium Martini, 1925; Cx. hortensis hortensis Ficalbi, 1889; Cx. territans Walker, 1856; Coquillettidia richiardii Ficalbi, 1889; Ochlerotatus geniculatus Olivier, 1791; Oc. cantans Meigen, 1818 and Aedes cinereus Meigen, 1818. Among the 57,680 individuals examined, Cx. pipiens s.l., Cx. torrentium and Cs. annulata are the dominants species and ubiquitous in all farms visited. The species of the genus Anopheles have strong ecological requirements and are therefore associated with some special habitats; other species however have a strong ability to adapt and therefore attend a wide variety of biotopes (Cx. pipiens s.l., Cx. torrentium and Cs. annulata). Water troughs, used tires and ponds are the most favorable habitats for larval development of Culicidae. The species potentially vectors of arboviruses that can cause problems in epidemiological farms are Cx. pipiens s.l., Cx. torrentium and Cq. richiardii. Therefore, despite the low diversity of mosquito observed within the livestock environments, they represent a significant risk for the reproduction of some potential vectors of arboviruses. In addition, some larval habitats constitute very favorable sites for proliferation of mosquito, causing a real problem of nuisance for animals of farms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular epidemiology of norovirus infections in symptomatic and and asymptomatic children from Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso
HUYNEN, Pascale ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Martin, Caroline et al

in Journal of Clinical Virology (2013), 58

Background: Noroviruses (NoV) are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Few epidemiologicaldata regarding the NoV strains circulating in African countries are available.Objectives: To determine ... [more ▼]

Background: Noroviruses (NoV) are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Few epidemiologicaldata regarding the NoV strains circulating in African countries are available.Objectives: To determine the prevalence of NoV in Bobo Dioulasso (Burkina Faso) in both symptomaticand asymptomatic gastroenteritis patients.Study design: Patients both with and without gastro-intestinal disorders were selected. Clinical andepidemiological data, as well as stool samples, were collected through March to April 2011.NoV molecular detection (genogrouping and genotyping) and viral load quantification were also per-formed for all samples.Results: NoV were detected in 22.2% of the 418 collected stool samples (21.2% and 24.8% from the 293symptomatic patients (SP) and the 125 asymptomatic patients (ASP) respectively).Genogroup (G) distribution was 7.5%, 10.2% and 3.4% for GI, GII and both GI/GII respectively among SPand 12.0%, 11.2% and 1.6% for GI, GII and both GI/GII, respectively, among ASP.Average viral load values were higher in SP than in ASP for GI (p = 0.03) but not for GII.Phylogenic analysis showed a high degree of genotype diversity in SP and ASP. One recombinantGII.7/GII.6 sequence was, to the best of our knowledge, detected for the first time.Conclusions: This study enabled identification of the specific molecular epidemiology of NoV strains cir-culating in a representative country in Eastern Africa, and additionally showed that ASP could play animportant “reservoir” role. A high strain diversity was detected with a surprisingly high proportion ofNoV GI compared to the common genotypes usually reported in comparable epidemiological studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudy of the virulence of serotypes 4 and 9 of African horse sickness virus in two mouse models
De la Grandière de Noronha Cotta, Maria Ana ULg; Zonta, William ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg et al

Poster (2013, October)

African horse sickness (AHSV) is an infectious disease caused by a double stranded positive RNA virus which belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. The virus has nine serotypes and is ... [more ▼]

African horse sickness (AHSV) is an infectious disease caused by a double stranded positive RNA virus which belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. The virus has nine serotypes and is transmitted by a culicoides biting midge, principally Culicoides imicola. African horse sickness causes severe morbidity and mortality up to 95 % in horses with severe economic losses. The establishment of an experimental model is needed for the investigation of the pathogenesis of this infection. Two mouse models, interferon-α receptor knock-out mice (A129 KO or IFNAR -/-) and immunocompetent mice (A129 WT), were tested. The viruses used for mice inoculations belonged to the two serotypes which caused epidemics in Europe, serotypes 4 and 9. The virus was inoculated by subcutaneous (SC) route and/or by intra-nasal (IN) route. Whole blood samples were taken from each mouse at regular intervals. The organs (liver, spleen, kidney, lung and brain) were taken at the end of the experiment or when the most affected mice were euthanized. All these samples were tested by a qRT-PCR targeting AHSV genome segment 7. Both serotypes of AHSV were detected by qRT-PCR until three weeks post-infection in blood of IFNAR -/- mice and A129 WT mice infected by SC route. Serotype 4 shows a higher peak of viremia than serotype 9. The peak of viremia was measured between day 2 and day 4 post-infection. These results demonstrate the potential of the immunodeficient mouse model for both clinical and biological features. The setting up of this mouse model has developed a tool for efficient in vivo study to characterize the in vivo virulence of this virus, to monitor the evolution of viral populations during in vivo replication cycles and to test the competence or vectorial capacity of indigenous Culicoides. Research supported by the Belgium Federal Public Service, Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudy of the virulence of serotypes 4 and 9 of the Orbivirus African horse sickness virus in two mouse models
De la Grandière de Noronha Cotta, Maria Ana ULg; Zonta, William ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg et al

Conference (2013, September 12)

African horse sickness (AHSV) is an infectious disease caused by a double stranded positive RNA virus which belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. The virus has nine serotypes and is ... [more ▼]

African horse sickness (AHSV) is an infectious disease caused by a double stranded positive RNA virus which belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. The virus has nine serotypes and is transmitted by a culicoides biting midge, principally Culicoides imicola. The establishment of an experimental model is needed for the investigation of the pathogenesis of this infection. Two mouse models, interferon-α receptor knock-out mice (A129 KO or IFNAR -/-) and immunocompetent mice (A129 WT), were tested. The viruses used for mice inoculations belonged to the two serotypes which caused epidemics in Europe, serotypes 4 and 9. The virus was inoculated by subcutaneous (SC) route and/or by intra-nasal (IN) route. Whole blood samples were taken from each mouse at regular intervals. The organs (liver, spleen, kidney, lung and brain) were taken at the end of the experiment or when the most affected mice were euthanized. All these samples were tested by a qRT-PCR targeting AHSV genome segment 7. Both serotypes of AHSV were detected by qRT-PCR until three weeks post-infection in blood of IFNAR -/- mice and A129 WT mice infected by SC route. Serotype 4 shows a higher peak of viremia than serotype 9. The peak of viremia was measured between day 2 and day 4 post-infection. These results demonstrate the potential of the immunodeficient mouse model for both clinical and biological features. The setting up of this mouse model has developed a tool for efficient in vivo study of AHSV. Research supported by the Belgium Federal Public Service, Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of a new rapid test for the detection of norovirus antigen in comparison with Real Time RT-PCR
HUYNEN, Pascale ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Gérard, Catherine ULg et al

Poster (2013, September)

Diagnosis of NoV infection mainly relies on molecular methods. A detection of viral antigens can also be performed by immunochromatographic assays, and may be useful in outbreak settings. The aim of this ... [more ▼]

Diagnosis of NoV infection mainly relies on molecular methods. A detection of viral antigens can also be performed by immunochromatographic assays, and may be useful in outbreak settings. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of the new RDT ImmunoCardSTAT!®Norovirus (Meridian Bioscience®, Europe) with a real time RT-PCR. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailÉtude de la virulence des sérotypes 4 et 9 du virus de la peste équine dans deux modèles murins
De la Grandière de Noronha Cotta, Maria Ana ULg; Zonta, William ULg; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg et al

Poster (2013, April)

Objectifs Le virus de la peste équine (African horse sickness virus ; AHSV) est un virus segmenté à ARN double brin, appartenant à la famille des Reoviridae et au genre Orbivirus. L’AHSV se différencie en ... [more ▼]

Objectifs Le virus de la peste équine (African horse sickness virus ; AHSV) est un virus segmenté à ARN double brin, appartenant à la famille des Reoviridae et au genre Orbivirus. L’AHSV se différencie en 9 sérotypes distincts et est transmis par la piqûre d’un vecteur, principalement Culicoides imicola. L’AHSV cause une sévère morbidité et un taux de mortalité qui peut atteindre 95 % chez les chevaux avec de lourdes conséquences économiques. L’établissement d’un modèle d’étude en souris est nécessaire pour plusieurs applications, comme l’investigation de la pathogénie de ce virus, l’étude de la virulence, l’étude d’efficacité de nouveaux vaccins. Méthodes Deux modèles murins, soit une lignée de souris déficientes en récepteur à l’interféron α (A129 KO ou IFNAR -/-), et une lignée immunocompétente (A 129 WT) ont été testées. Les virus de sérotypes 4 et 9 de l’AHSV ont été utilisés pour les inoculations des souris ; ces deux sérotypes ont été à l’origine des épidémies observées en Espagne en 1969 et à la fin des années 80 en Espagne et au Portugal. Le virus a été inoculé par voie sous-cutanée (SC) et/ou par voie intra-nasale (IN) et un groupe de souris témoin (mock-infected) a été utilisé pour les deux modèles testés. Des échantillons de sang ont été prélevés de chaque souris infectée et témoin à intervalles réguliers. Les organes (foie, rate, reins, poumon et cerveau) ont été prélevés à la fin de l’expérience pour la plupart des souris ou lors de l’euthanasie des souris qui présentaient des signes cliniques très prononcés. Tous les échantillons, sang et organes, ont été analysés par qRT-PCR avec comme cible le segment 7 codant la protéine VP7 de l’AHSV qui est la protéine de structure la plus conservée entre les différents sérotypes. Résultats Les deux sérotypes de l’AHSV ont été détectés par qRT-PCR jusqu’à 3 semaines post-infection (ce qui correspond à la fin de l’expérience) dans le sang des souris IFNAR -/- et A129 WT infectées par la voie SC. Le virus de sérotype 4 atteint des niveaux de virémie légèrement plus élevés par rapport au virus de sérotype 9. Les souris A129 WT infectées par la voie intra-nasale ne montrent à aucun moment de l’expérience de virémie détectable par la qRT-PCR. Le pic de virémie a été mesuré entre le jour 2 et le jour 4 post-infection pour les deux lignées de souris. Au pic de virémie, la quantité de ADNc correspondant au segment-7 viral, après quantification par qRT-PCR, était plus élevée chez les souris IFNAR -/-. Conclusions Les souris immunodéficientes (IFNAR -/-) présentent des caractéristiques cliniques et biologiques permettant l’établissement d’un modèle in vivo pertinent. Selon les premiers résultats obtenus, il semble que la voie sous-cutanée soit la voie à privilégier pour les expériences in vivo futures. La mise au point de ce modèle sur souris permet de disposer d’un outil efficace et nécessaire pour l’étude in vivo de l’AHSV, afin de caractériser in vivo la virulence de ce virus et de suivre l’évolution des populations virales pendant la multiplication virale in vivo. Remerciements Recherche financée par le service Recherche Contractuelle, Service Public Fédérale, Santé Publique, Sécurité de la Chaîne alimentaire et Environnement (RT 12/6262 INDEVIREQ 2.0) [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGenetic and evolutionary perspectives on genogroup III, genotype 2 bovine noroviruses
Mauroy, Axel ULg; Scipioni, Alexandra; Mathijs, Elisabeth et al

in Archives of Virology (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailZoonoses in Pet 1 birds: review and perspectives
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRenouveler la gestion du risque par l’ouverture à un système de vigilance ? Le cas de la fièvre catarrhale ovine
Fallon, Catherine ULg; Piet, Grégory ULg; Thiry, Etienne ULg et al

in VertigO : la Revue Electronique en Sciences de l'Environnement (2012), 12(3),

This contribution proposed by a multidisciplinary group of veterinary and political scientists gives an analysis of the transformations of an epidemiosurveillance system dedicated to animal diseases, when ... [more ▼]

This contribution proposed by a multidisciplinary group of veterinary and political scientists gives an analysis of the transformations of an epidemiosurveillance system dedicated to animal diseases, when confronted to new emerging threats in the wake of global changes, within the frame of risk management. The research field refers to the emergence of bluetongue virus serotype 8 in 2006 in Belgium. This research is complemented with the results of a recent survey based on Delphi method involving relevant public servants and scientists, which showed that most of the means proposed by the authorities are based on the logic of known risk management. However we can identify attempts for renewal and organisational learning, especially with the proposal of a new vigilance system. This system develops two dimensions (prevention and anticipation of the catastrophe) and tries to accommodate the surveillance system reactivity against uncertain events. Finally the article draws two drivers for change, by admitting the persistence of unavoidable uncertainty and by recognising the importance for opening up expert knowledge. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (10 ULg)
See detailMolecular detection of HAV by a new one step real time RT-PCR
Zonta, William ULg; Denayer, Sarah; Thiry, Etienne ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Introduction and objectives Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a RNA virus with a single-stranded positive sense genome and the only species of the genus Hepatovirus of the Picornaviridae family. Belgium and ... [more ▼]

Introduction and objectives Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a RNA virus with a single-stranded positive sense genome and the only species of the genus Hepatovirus of the Picornaviridae family. Belgium and European countries in general, are countries with a low prevalence and the majority of adults can be infected. HAV is mainly transmitted by the fecal-oral route and even if foodborne outbreaks account for less than 5 % of the reported cases per year, the source of infection cannot be identified in 50 % of the reported cases. Therefore the contribution of foodborne infection is probably underestimated. Viral loads in food samples are lower than in clinical samples and their detection requires refined molecular detection methods. Methods A one step real-time RT-PCR to detect HAV, with new primers (HAV F2 and HAV R2) and probe (HAV P2) was performed directly on HAV diluted suspensions and on food samples (dates) and was compared with a ready-to-use commercial kit. Before the one step real time RT-PCR, a preliminary step combining concentration of viral particles with polyethyleneglycol and centrifugation was used on food samples. Results Real time RT-PCR one step with HAV F2/R2/P2 is more efficient but less sensitive than the commercial kit. It could be used to confirm a positive sample or to detect HAV in an unknown sample. With cell cultured HAV, the limit of detection (LOD) is 1.25 infectious particles in volume tested by RT-PCR or 102 TCID50/ml. In food samples, LOD is between 25 infectious particles and 250 infectious particles in volume tested by RT-PCR or between 104 and 105 TCID50/ml. Several hypotheses could explain these results: the loss of viral particles during the extraction process, the low efficiency of RNA extraction and interference of food on molecular detection. Conclusion Molecular detection of virus in food samples remains a challenge and the protocol of extraction should be improved and adapted at each food category to increase the sensitivity of detection in food matrices characterized by a low viral contamination. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudy of the virulence of african horse sickness virus serotypeS 4 and 9 in two mouse models
De la Grandière de Noronha Cotta, Maria Ana ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg; Caij, Ann Brigitte et al

Poster (2012, September)

Objectives African horse sickness is an infectious disease caused by a double stranded positive RNA virus which belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. The virus has nine known antigenically ... [more ▼]

Objectives African horse sickness is an infectious disease caused by a double stranded positive RNA virus which belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. The virus has nine known antigenically distinct serotypes and is transmitted by a culicoides biting midge, principally Culicoides imicola. African horse sickness causes severe morbidity and mortality up to 95 % in horses with severe economic losses. The establishment of an experimental mouse model is needed for the investigation of the pathogenesis of this infection. Methods Two mouse models, interferon-α receptor knock-out mice and immunocompetent mice, were tested. The used virus for mice inoculations belonged to the two serotypes which caused epidemics in Europe, serotypes 4 and 9. The virus was inoculated by subcutaneous route and/or by intra-nasal route. Samples of whole blood were taken for each infected and knock-out mice at regular intervals. The organs (liver, spleen, kidney, lung and brain) were taken at the end of experience of when the most affected mices were euthanasied. All these samples were tested by a qRT-PCR targeting African horse sickness genome segment 7. Results The results demonstrate the potential of the immunodeficient mouse model for both clinical and biological features. Both serotypes of African horse sickness were detected by qRT-PCR until three weeks post-infection (corresponding with the end of the experience) in blood. Conclusions The setting up of this mouse model has developed a tool for efficient in vivo study to characterize the in vivo virulence of this virus, to monitor the evolution of viral populations during in vivo replication cycles and to test the competence or vectorial capacity of indigenous Culicoides. Acknowledgement Research supported by the Belgium Federal Public Service, Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRisk of introduction of alphaviruses responsible for American equine encephalitides in Belgium
De la Grandière de Noronha Cotta, Maria Ana ULg; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

Poster (2012, August)

Arthropod-borne viruses are a threat for human and animal healths in regards with their dissemination out of their endemic area. The arboviruses reviewed here belong to the family Togaviridae genus ... [more ▼]

Arthropod-borne viruses are a threat for human and animal healths in regards with their dissemination out of their endemic area. The arboviruses reviewed here belong to the family Togaviridae genus Alphavirus and are small enveloped positive sense RNA viruses. They are considered as exotic equid pathogens in Europe and can cause severe diseases in humans in the context of an epidemic. Arboviruses have complex epidemiologic features characterised by interactions between viruses, vectors, reservoir or susceptible host species, and environment. A bibliographic search was performed to identify the mean factors that influenced past outbreaks in America and the presence of potential vectors/vertebrate hosts that could play a role in the transmission cycle in Belgium. Three equine arboviruses, currently considered as the main current threats of emergence/introduction in Western Europe, were chosen as model for this study: Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). In conclusion, taking into consideration the globalisation (increase of international exchanges) and climate warming, the analysis of the different features of the arbovirus cycles are essential to a balanced risk expertise in the Belgian context. Research supported by the Belgium Federal Public Service, Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
See detailOptimalisation d’une RT-PCR en temps réel pour la détection du virus de l’hépatite A
Zonta, William ULg; Denayer, Sarah; Thiry, Etienne ULg et al

Poster (2012, March)

En Belgique, l’incidence de l’hépatite A (HAV) est de 1,2 cas pour 100000 habitants. La population présente une faible immunité contre le HAV puisque seulement 50 % de la population possèdent des ... [more ▼]

En Belgique, l’incidence de l’hépatite A (HAV) est de 1,2 cas pour 100000 habitants. La population présente une faible immunité contre le HAV puisque seulement 50 % de la population possèdent des anticorps anti-HAV après l’âge de 30 ans. Ainsi un grand nombre d’individus reste susceptible de contracter une infection par le HAV. Les sources de contamination sont principalement le contact de personne à personne mais aussi la consommation d’aliments (crus ou « ready-to-eat) contaminés. Cette contamination peut provenir de l’eau d’irrigation pour les fruits et légumes, de l’eau de mer pour les mollusques bivalves ou de la manipulation de l’homme lors des différentes étapes entre la récolte et la vente du produit. Dans ce projet, une nouvelle RT-PCR spécifique pour la détection du HAV est développée et évaluée. Pour choisir de nouvelles amorces et sondes, des alignements sont réalisés avec les séquences de 19 souches de HAV (DNASTAR Lasergene) afin de cibler les régions les plus conservées du génome du HAV. Cinq nouveaux couples d’amorces ciblant plusieurs régions hautement conservées du génome de HAV ont été sélectionnés et testés à différentes températures d’hybridation et différentes concentrations en utilisant un agent se liant à l’ADN double brin (SYBR Green). Une sonde fluorescente, de type FAM, spécifique de l’amplicon délimité par le couple d’amorces fournissant les meilleurs résultats a été dessinée et utilisée avec la technologie d’hydrolyse de sonde à deux concentrations différentes. Des dilutions d’un facteur 10 de la suspension de la souche HM175 (HAV) ont été testées par le couple d’amorces et la sonde choisit pour établir ainsi une limite de détection. La spécificité du couple d’amorce choisit a été testé en présence de différents picornavirus et virus entériques et de 3 génotypes de HAV (IA, IB et IIIA). Le plasmide Sybricon019 et ses amorces spécifiques ont été utilisés comme contrôle interne d’amplification (IAC). Un contrôle positif a aussi été créé afin de s’assurer du fonctionnement correct de la PCR en temps réel. Parmi les 5 couples d’amorces sélectionnés, le couple HAV-F2/HAV-R2 permet d’obtenir les valeurs de Ct les plus faibles avec une concentration optimale de 300nM pour les amorces sens et anti-sens. Ce couple d’amorces cible la région VP1/VP3 du génome du HAV. Différentes températures d’hybridation ont été testées et la température la plus élevée (60°C) a été sélectionnée pour limiter le risque d’amplification aspécifique. Pour augmenter la spécificité, une sonde, HAV P2, spécifique de l’amplicon délimité par les amorces HAV-F2 et HAV-R2, est utilisée à la concentration de 250nM. Des dilutions d’un facteur 10 d’une suspension de HAV, 107 à 101 particules infectieuses par ml (déterminées par TCID50), donnent respectivement des valeurs de Ct de 19,2 à 38,4 et les dilutions de 100 à 10-2 particules infectieuses par ml ne donnent aucune amplification. La limite de détection est donc de 10 particules infectieuses par ml. La spécificité des amorces et de la sonde pour la détection du HAV est correcte puisque les trois génotypes de HAV, IA, IB et IIIA, ont été détectés alors que les différents picornavirus et virus entériques n’ont donné aucun signal fluorescent d’amplification. L’optimalisation d’un nouveau couple d’amorce et d’une sonde (HAV-F2, -R2 et -P2) ciblant une région hautement conservée du génome permet de détecter le virus HAV par RT-PCR. La région ciblée (VP1/VP3) diffère de la plupart des méthodes de détection de HAV par PCR en temps réelle décrites à ce jour. La seconde étape consiste à réaliser une série de tests dans différentes matrices alimentaires à risque (fruits de mer, fruits et légumes crus) dans le but de détecter des échantillons naturellement contaminés par le HAV. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRisques d'introduction des alphavirus responsables des encéphalites virales équines américaines en Belgique
De la Grandière de Noronha Cotta, Maria Ana ULg; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

Poster (2012, March)

Les virus transmis par des arthropodes hématophages (arbovirus) représentent une menace pour la santé animale et humaine en fonction de l’augmentation de l’émergence des arboviroses en dehors des ... [more ▼]

Les virus transmis par des arthropodes hématophages (arbovirus) représentent une menace pour la santé animale et humaine en fonction de l’augmentation de l’émergence des arboviroses en dehors des territoires endémiques. Les arbovirus étudiés ici appartiennent au genre Alphavirus et à la famille des Togaviridae, et sont composés d’un génome à ARN simple brin de polarité positive et enveloppés. Ces virus sont des pathogènes exotiques des équidés et causent des maladies graves chez l’homme lors d’épidémies. Les arbovirus présentent une épidémiologie complexe car ils se retrouvent au centre de l’interaction avec 5 composants : le virus, le vecteur, le réservoir, les espèces animales sensibles et l’environnement. Les voies d’introduction possible en Belgique de ces virus ont été investiguées ici en fonction des caractéristiques étiologiques et épidémiologiques de chaque virus. L’encéphalite équine de l’Est (EEEV) a un cycle complexe principal incluant les oiseaux et des moustiques comme Culiseta melanura. Les souches nord-américaines et sud-américaines peuvent être différenciées antigéniquement et génétiquement et ont des différences importantes dans leur cycle de transmission et au niveau de leur virulence. Le cycle naturel de l’EEEV se réalise chaque année dans des zones marécageuses et la migration d’oiseaux virémiques serait une hypothèse à sa réintroduction printanière annuelle. Certaines années, le virus peut être amplifié pendant ce cycle oiseaux-moustiques et le virus devient disponible à d’autres espèces de vecteurs qui font le pont entre les oiseaux et les humains ou d’autres mammifères comme les chevaux. Grâce à cette observation, l’EEEV a pu être isolé de vecteur comme Ochlerotatus sollicitans, Coquillettidia perturbans ou encore Culex pipiens et Aedes vexans qui sont deux espèces bien présentes en Europe. Le risque d’importation de l’EEEV semble peu élevé, elle pourrait se faire par l’intermédiaire du transport volontaire ou involontaire, légal ou illégal d’espèces réservoirs d’oiseaux comme des passériformes (ex : moineau domestique ou des oiseaux d’eau (ex : Egretta thula), des rongeurs comme le rat des cotonniers, des vertébrés ectothermiques comme les amphibiens (ex : Rana catesbeiana) ou des reptiles (ex : Agkistrodon piscivorus), ou encore par le transport accidentel de vecteurs compétents. L’encéphalite équine de l’Ouest (WEEV) est retrouvée dans l’Ouest de l’Amérique du Nord et en Amérique du Sud. Ce virus est un virus recombinant entre le Sindbis virus et l’EEEV. Le virus est inclus dans un cycle qui implique des passereaux et Culex tarsalis. Un deuxième cycle moins connu est rapporté et implique un lapin ou lièvre sauvage (Lepus europaeus) avec un moustique du genre Aedes. Comme pour l’EEEV, les humains et les chevaux ne développent pas une virémie suffisante pour infecter les moustiques et continuer le cycle. Le WEEV pourrait être introduit en Europe par différentes voies : les vecteurs arthropodes adultes infectés ou leurs œufs pour Aedes dorsalis, l’introduction d’oiseaux comme des passériformes ou des mammifères comme le lièvre sauvage virémiques. L’acquisition de la compétence d’un vecteur indigène local comme Culex pipiens ou Aedes dorsalis doit aussi être envisagée. Le groupe des virus de l’encéphalite équine vénézuélienne (VEEV) est sous-divisé en souches enzootiques et souches épizootiques qui utilisent le cheval comme hôte amplificateur. Les souches épizootiques sont opportunistes pour leur choix de vecteurs avec comme conséquence un large panel de vecteurs potentiels. L’introduction et l’établissement de ce virus en Belgique est possible via des moustiques infectés, des rongeurs comme le rat des cotonniers ou des oiseaux d’eau infectés, des chevaux et des hommes infectés qui sont des hôtes amplificateurs pour les souches épizootiques. En conclusion, il convient de faire la distinction entre l’introduction et l’établissement d’une infection de ces virus en Belgique. L’introduction peut se faire par l’intermédiaire de vecteurs insectes ou d’hôtes oiseaux ou mammifères comme les rongeurs ou encore le cheval et l’homme dans le cas du VEEV épizootique. Le maintien de l’infection nécessite la présence de vecteurs indigènes avec une compétence vectorielle ou de vecteurs compétents invasifs pour ces virus ainsi que la présence d’hôtes mammifères ou oiseaux phylogénétiquement apparentés à des espèces réservoirs dans les régions américaines où ces virus sont endémiques. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEquine coital exanthema and its potential économic implications for the equine industry
Barrandeguy, M.; Thiry, Etienne ULg

in Veterinary Journal (2012), 191

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe virus Schmallenberg ou l’émergence du premier Orthobunyavirus du sérogroupe Simbu en Europe
Martinelle, Ludovic ULg; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; Kirschvink, N et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2012), 156(1), 07-24

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (19 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFatal outbreaks in dogs associated with pantropic canine coronavirus in France and Belgium
Zicola, A.; Jolly, Sandra ULg; Mathijs, E. et al

in Journal of Small Animal Practice (2012), 53

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Review of Known and Hypothetical Transmission Routes for Noroviruses
Mathijs, E.; Stals, A.; Baert, L. et al

in Food and Environmental Virology (2012), 4(4), 131-152

Human noroviruses (NoVs) are considered a worldwide leading cause of acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Due to a combination of prolonged shedding of high virus levels in feces, virus particle shedding ... [more ▼]

Human noroviruses (NoVs) are considered a worldwide leading cause of acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Due to a combination of prolonged shedding of high virus levels in feces, virus particle shedding during asymptomatic infections, and a high environmental persistence, NoVs are easily transmitted pathogens. Norovirus (NoV) outbreaks have often been reported and tend to affect a lot of people. NoV is spread via feces and vomit, but this NoV spread can occur through several transmission routes. While person-to-person transmission is without a doubt the dominant transmission route, human infective NoV outbreaks are often initiated by contaminated food or water. Zoonotic transmission of NoV has been investigated, but has thus far not been demonstrated. The presented review aims to give an overview of these NoV transmission routes. Regarding NoV person-to-person transmission, the NoV GII. 4 genotype is discussed in the current review as it has been very successful for several decades but reasons for its success have only recently been suggested. Both pre-harvest and post-harvest contamination of food products can lead to NoV food borne illness. Pre-harvest contamination of food products mainly occurs via contact with polluted irrigation water in case of fresh produce or with contaminated harvesting water in case of bivalve molluscan shellfish. On the other hand, an infected food handler is considered as a major cause of post-harvest contamination of food products. Both transmission routes are reviewed by a summary of described NoV food borne outbreaks between 2000 and 2010. A third NoV transmission route occurs via water and the spread of NoV via river water, ground water, and surface water is reviewed. Finally, although zoonotic transmission remains hypothetical, a summary on the bovine and porcine NoV presence observed in animals is given and the presence of human infective NoV in animals is discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (8 ULg)