References of "Thibaut, Aurore"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailDisorders of Consciousness
Bodart, Olivier ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Citerio, G.; Smith, M.; Kofke, A. (Eds.) Oxford Textbook of neurocritical care (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (11 ULg)
See detailBrain stimulation for patients with disorders of consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; BODART, Olivier ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in Canavero, Sergio (Ed.) Surgical Principles of Therapeutic Cortical Stimulation (2015)

There is a long history of brain stimulation in medical science, and it was tested for years to try to treat several neurological diseases. Research has long been focused on some cortical areas and deep ... [more ▼]

There is a long history of brain stimulation in medical science, and it was tested for years to try to treat several neurological diseases. Research has long been focused on some cortical areas and deep brain structures like the prefrontal cortex and the thalamus. On the other hand, the treatment choices for patients with severe brain injury resulting in disorders of consciousness are still limited and research in this field remains challenging. In the current literature, only a few techniques of brain stimulation were studied scientifically in this population of patients. We will here describe noninvasive techniques, namely transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation, which permit to stimulate the brain through the scalp. Next, we will discuss the current status of deep brain stimulation as treatment for patients with disorders of consciousness. Finally we will develop hypothesis to explain the mechanism of action of these means of brain stimulation. We will see that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation studies showed encouraging results, with improvements in the behavioral signs of consciousness of severely brain injured patients, both chronic and acute, traumatic or non-traumatic, without influence of the stimulation side. Deep brain stimulation showed more impressive and extensive behavioral improvement after the implantation of an electrical stimulator in the intralaminar nuclei. However, this procedure is riskier and the number of patients who can benefit from this intervention are still limited. These therapeutic approaches are still in their infancy. In the years to follow, interventions should multiply and therapeutic measures should be more accessible, controlled and effective. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring consciousness in coma and related states
Di Perri, Carol; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg et al

in World Journal of Radiology (2014), 6(8),

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiagnostic precision of PET imaging and functional MRI in disorders of consciousness: a clinical validation study
Stender, Johan; Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg et al

in Lancet Neurology (2014)

Background: Bedside clinical examinations can have high rates of misdiagnosis of unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (vegetative state) or minimally conscious state. The diagnostic and prognostic usefulness ... [more ▼]

Background: Bedside clinical examinations can have high rates of misdiagnosis of unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (vegetative state) or minimally conscious state. The diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of neuroimaging-based approaches has not been established in a clinical setting. We did a validation study of two neuroimaging-based diagnostic methods: PET imaging and functional MRI (fMRI). Methods: For this clinical validation study, we included patients referred to the University Hospital of Liège, Belgium, between January, 2008, and June, 2012, who were diagnosed by our unit with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, locked-in syndrome, or minimally conscious state with traumatic or non-traumatic causes. We did repeated standardised clinical assessments with the Coma Recovery Scale—Revised (CRS—R), cerebral 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, and fMRI during mental activation tasks. We calculated the diagnostic accuracy of both imaging methods with CRS—R diagnosis as reference. We assessed outcome after 12 months with the Glasgow Outcome Scale—Extended. Findings: We included 41 patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, four with locked-in syndrome, and 81 in a minimally conscious state (48=traumatic, 78=non-traumatic; 110=chronic, 16=subacute). 18F-FDG PET had high sensitivity for identification of patients in a minimally conscious state (93%, 95% CI 85—98) and high congruence (85%, 77—90) with behavioural CRS—R scores. The active fMRI method was less sensitive at diagnosis of a minimally conscious state (45%, 30—61) and had lower overall congruence with behavioural scores (63%, 51—73) than PET imaging. 18F-FDG PET correctly predicted outcome in 75 of 102 patients (74%, 64—81), and fMRI in 36 of 65 patients (56%, 43—67). 13 of 42 (32%) of the behaviourally unresponsive patients (ie, diagnosed as unresponsive with CRS—R) showed brain activity compatible with (minimal) consciousness (ie, activity associated with consciousness, but diminished compared with fully conscious individuals) on at least one neuroimaging test; 69% of these (9 of 13) patients subsequently recovered consciousness. Interpretation: Cerebral 18F-FDG PET could be used to complement bedside examinations and predict long-term recovery of patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. Active fMRI might also be useful for differential diagnosis, but seems to be less accurate. Funding: The Belgian National Funds for Scientific Research (FNRS), Fonds Léon Fredericq, the European Commission, the James McDonnell Foundation, the Mind Science Foundation, the French Speaking Community Concerted Research Action, the University of Copenhagen, and the University of Liège. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEffect of zolpidem in chronic disorders of consciousness: a prospective open-label study.
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg et al

in Functional Neurology (2014)

Zolpidem has been reported as an "awakening drug" in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). We here present the results of a prospective openlabel study in chronic DOC patients. Sixty ... [more ▼]

Zolpidem has been reported as an "awakening drug" in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). We here present the results of a prospective openlabel study in chronic DOC patients. Sixty patients (35±15 years; 18 females; mean time since insult ± SD: 4±5.5 years; 31 with traumatic etiology) with a diagnosis of vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (n=28) or minimally conscious state (n=32) were behaviorally assessed using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) before and one hour after administration of 10 mg of zolpidem. At the group level, the diagnosis did not change after intake of zolpidem (p=0.10) and CRS-R total scores decreased (p=0.01). Twelve patients (20%) showed improved behaviors and/or CRS-R total scores after zolpidem administration but in only one patient was the diagnosis after zolpidem intake found to show a significant improvement (functional object use), which suggested a change of diagnosis. However, in this patient, a double-blind placebo-controlled trial was performed in order to better specify the effects of zolpidem, but the patient, on this trial, failed to show any clinical improvements. The present open-label study therefore failed to show any clinically significant improvement (i.e., change of Effect of zolpidem in chronic disorders of consciousness: a prospective open-label study diagnosis) in any of the 60 studied chronic DOC patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAssessing consciousness in coma and related states using transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography.
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Annales Françaises d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation (2014)

Thanks to advances in medical care, an increased number of patients recover from coma. However, some remain in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome or in a minimally conscious state. Detection of ... [more ▼]

Thanks to advances in medical care, an increased number of patients recover from coma. However, some remain in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome or in a minimally conscious state. Detection of awareness in severely brain-injured patients is challenging because it relies on behavioral assessments, which can be affected by motor, sensory and cognitive impairments of the patients. Other means of evaluation are needed to improve the accuracy of the diagnosis in this challenging population. We will here review the different altered states of consciousness occurring after severe brain damage, and explain the difficulties associated with behavioral assessment of consciousness. We will then describe a non-invasive technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG), which has allowed us to detect the presence or absence of consciousness in different physiological, pathological and pharmacological states. Some potential underlying mechanisms of the loss of consciousness will then be discussed. In conclusion, TMS-EEG is highly promising in identifying markers of consciousness at the individual level and might be of great value for clinicians in the assessment of consciousness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPositron emission tomography imaging in altered states of consciousness: Coma, sleep and hypnosis
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Stender, Johan et al

in Dierckx, Rudi; Otte, Andreas; Vries, Erik (Eds.) et al PET and SPECT in Neurology (2014)

Positron emission tomography (PET) allows studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow and has been widely used to investigate physiological mechanisms underlying altered states of consciousness. The aim ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) allows studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow and has been widely used to investigate physiological mechanisms underlying altered states of consciousness. The aim of this chapter is to review the current literature on brain metabolism during physiological or pathological loss of consciousness including studies on disorders of consciousness arising from severe brain injury (vegetative/unresponsive or minimally conscious states), and related non-pathological conditions such as sleep and hypnotic states. Identifying brain areas specifically involved in conscious processing, these studies have contributed to our understanding of the underlying physiology of consciousness. The precuneal and cingulate cortices, for example, seem to be key areas for maintaining consciousness awareness. Other areas such as hypothalamus, amygdala or the temporo-occipital cortex seem to play a role in different states of unconsciousness such as rapid eye movement sleep and hypnosis. PET studies permit a better comprehension of the loss of consciousness, and focus the implication of specific neural areas and networks in pathologically (vegetative/unresponsive or minimally conscious states), physiologically (sleep), and hypnotically altered states of consciousness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailActigraphy assessments of circadian sleep-wake cycles in the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States
Cruse, Damian; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2013), 11(18),

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCurative and palliative treatments for patients with disorder of consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; HUANG, Wangshan

Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailWhat about treatments for patients with disorder of consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULg

Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImagerie encéphalique et perception du mouvement
Thibaut, Aurore ULg

Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa stimulation transcranienne a courant continu : un nouvel outil de neurostimulation.
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Revue Neurologique (2013), 169

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a safe method to modulate cortical excitability. Anodal stimulation can improve the stimulated area's functions whereas cathodal stimulation reduces them ... [more ▼]

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a safe method to modulate cortical excitability. Anodal stimulation can improve the stimulated area's functions whereas cathodal stimulation reduces them. Currently, a lot of clinical trials have been conducted to study the effect of tDCS on post-stroke motor and language deficits, in depression, chronic pain, memory impairment and tinnitus in order to decrease symptoms. Results showed that, if an effect is observed with tDCS, it does not persist over time. Current studies suggest that direct current stimulation is a promising technique that helps to improve rehabilitation after stroke, to enhance cognitive deficiencies, to reduce depression and to relieve chronic pain. Moreover, it is a safe, simple and cheap device that could be easily integrated in a rehabilitation program. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpasticity after stroke: Physiology, assessment and treatment
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Ziegler, Erik ULg et al

in Brain Injury (2013), 27(10), 1093-1105

Spasticity following a stroke occurs in about 30% of patients. The mechanisms underlying this disorder, however, are not well understood. This review aims to define spasticity, describe hypotheses ... [more ▼]

Spasticity following a stroke occurs in about 30% of patients. The mechanisms underlying this disorder, however, are not well understood. This review aims to define spasticity, describe hypotheses explaining its development after a stroke, give an overview of related neuroimaging studies as well as a description of the most common scales used to quantify the degree of spasticity and finally explore which treatments are currently being used to treat this disorder. The lack of consensus is highlighted on the basis of spasticity and the associated absence of guidelines for treatment, use of drugs and rehabilitation programmes. Future studies require controlled protocols to determine the efficiency of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Neuroimaging may help predict the occurrence of spasticity and could provide insight into its neurological basis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 147 (16 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLes corrélats neuronaux de la Conscience
Thibaut, Aurore ULg

Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMetabolic activity in external and internal awareness networks in severely brain-damaged patients.
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg et al

in Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine (2012), 44(6), 487-94

OBJECTIVE: An extrinsic cerebral network (encompassing lateral frontoparietal cortices) related to external/sensory awareness and an intrinsic midline network related to internal/self-awareness have been ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: An extrinsic cerebral network (encompassing lateral frontoparietal cortices) related to external/sensory awareness and an intrinsic midline network related to internal/self-awareness have been identified recently. This study measured brain metabolism in both networks in patients with severe brain damage. DESIGN: Prospective [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised assessments in a university hospital setting. SUBJECTS: Healthy volunteers and patients in vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS), minimally conscious state (MCS), emergence from MCS (EMCS), and locked-in syndrome (LIS). RESULTS: A total of 70 patients were included in the study: 24 VS/UWS, 28 MCS, 10 EMCS, 8 LIS and 39 age-matched controls. VS/UWS showed metabolic dysfunction in extrinsic and intrinsic networks and thalami. MCS showed dysfunction mostly in intrinsic network and thalami. EMCS showed impairment in posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortices. LIS showed dysfunction only in infratentorial regions. Coma Recovery Scale-Revised total scores correlated with metabolic activity in both extrinsic and part of the intrinsic network and thalami. CONCLUSION: Progressive recovery of extrinsic and intrinsic awareness network activity was observed in severely brain-damaged patients, ranging from VS/UWS, MCS, EMCS to LIS. The predominance of intrinsic network impairment in MCS could reflect altered internal/self-awareness in these patients, which is difficult to quantify at the bedside. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 211 (52 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe ethics of managing disorders of consciousness
Demertzi, Athina ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg et al

in Schnakers, Caroline; Laureys, Steven (Eds.) Coma and disorders of consciousness (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULg)