References of "Thibaut, Aurore"
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See detailBehavioural Diagnosis of Disorders of Consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Di Perri, Carol ULg; Bodart, Olivier ULg et al

in Rossetti, Andrea; Laureys, Steven (Eds.) Clinical Neurophysiology in Disorders of Consciousness (in press)

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See detailDisorders of Consciousness
Bodart, Olivier ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Citerio, G.; Smith, M.; Kofke, A. (Eds.) Oxford Textbook of neurocritical care (in press)

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See detailBrain stimulation for patients with disorders of consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; BODART, Olivier ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in Canavero, Sergio (Ed.) Surgical Principles of Therapeutic Cortical Stimulation (2015)

There is a long history of brain stimulation in medical science, and it was tested for years to try to treat several neurological diseases. Research has long been focused on some cortical areas and deep ... [more ▼]

There is a long history of brain stimulation in medical science, and it was tested for years to try to treat several neurological diseases. Research has long been focused on some cortical areas and deep brain structures like the prefrontal cortex and the thalamus. On the other hand, the treatment choices for patients with severe brain injury resulting in disorders of consciousness are still limited and research in this field remains challenging. In the current literature, only a few techniques of brain stimulation were studied scientifically in this population of patients. We will here describe noninvasive techniques, namely transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation, which permit to stimulate the brain through the scalp. Next, we will discuss the current status of deep brain stimulation as treatment for patients with disorders of consciousness. Finally we will develop hypothesis to explain the mechanism of action of these means of brain stimulation. We will see that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation studies showed encouraging results, with improvements in the behavioral signs of consciousness of severely brain injured patients, both chronic and acute, traumatic or non-traumatic, without influence of the stimulation side. Deep brain stimulation showed more impressive and extensive behavioral improvement after the implantation of an electrical stimulator in the intralaminar nuclei. However, this procedure is riskier and the number of patients who can benefit from this intervention are still limited. These therapeutic approaches are still in their infancy. In the years to follow, interventions should multiply and therapeutic measures should be more accessible, controlled and effective. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in cerebral metabolism in patients with a minimally conscious state responding to zolpidem.
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Frontiers in Neuroscience (2014)

Background:Zolpidem,ashort-actingnon-benzodiazepineGABAagonisthypnotic,hasbeenshowntoinduceparadoxicalresponsesinsomepatientswithdisordersofconsciousness(DOC ... [more ▼]

Background:Zolpidem,ashort-actingnon-benzodiazepineGABAagonisthypnotic,hasbeenshowntoinduceparadoxicalresponsesinsomepatientswithdisordersofconsciousness(DOC),leadingtorecoveryofarousalandcognitiveabilities.Wehereassessedzolpidem-inducedchangesinregionalbrainmetabolisminthreepatientswithknownzolpidemresponseinchronicpost-anoxicminimallyconsciousstate(MCS).Methods:[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucosepositronemissiontomography(FDG-PET)andstandardizedclinicalassessmentsusingtheComaRecoveryScale-Revisedwereperformedafteradministrationof10mgzolpidemorplaceboinarandomizeddoubleblind2-dayprotocol.PETdatapreprocessingandcomparisonwithahealthyage-matchedcontrolgroupwereperformedusingstatisticalparametricmapping(SPM8).Results:Behaviorally,allpatientsrecoveredfunctionalcommunicationafteradministrationofzolpidem(i.e.,emergencefromtheMCS).FDG-PETshowedincreasedmetabolismindorsolateralprefrontalandmesiofrontalcorticesafterzolpidembutnotafterplaceboadministration.Conclusion:Ourdatashowametabolicactivationofprefrontalareas,corroboratingtheproposedmesocircuithypothesistoexplaintheparadoxicaleffectofzolpidemobservedinsomepatientswithDOC.ItalsosuggeststhekeyroleoftheprefrontalcorticesintherecoveryoffunctionalcommunicationandobjectuseinhypoxicpatientswithchronicMCS. [less ▲]

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See detailSpasticity in disorders of consciousness: a behavioral study
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Wannez, Sarah ULg et al

in European Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (2014)

Background: Spasticity is a frequent complication after severe brain injury, which may impede the rehabilitation process and diminish the patients’ quality of life. Aim: We here investigate the presence ... [more ▼]

Background: Spasticity is a frequent complication after severe brain injury, which may impede the rehabilitation process and diminish the patients’ quality of life. Aim: We here investigate the presence of spasticity in a population of non-communicative patients with disorders of consciousness. We also evaluate the correlation between spasticity and potential factors of co-morbidity, frequency of physical therapy, time since insult presence of pain, presence of tendon retraction, etiology and diagnosis. Design: Cross sectional study. Setting: University Hospital of Liège, Belgium. Population: 65 patients with chronic (>3 months post insult) disorders of consciousness were included (22 women; mean age: 44±14y; 40 with traumatic etiology; 40 in a minimally conscious state; time since insult: 39±37months). Methods: Spasticity was measured with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and pain was assessed using the Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R). Results: Out of 65 patients, 58 demonstrated signs of spasticity (89%; MAS ≥ 1), including 39 who showed severe spasticity (60%; MAS ≥ 3). Patients with spasticity receiving anti-spastic medication were more spastic than unmedicated patients. A negative correlation was observed between the severity of spasticity and the frequency of physical therapy. MAS scores correlated positively with time since injury and NCS-R scores. We did not observe a difference of spasticity between the diagnostic. Conclusion: A large proportion of patients with disorders of consciousness develop severe spasticity, possibly affecting their functional recovery and their quality of life. The observed correlation between degrees of spasticity and pain scores highlights the importance of pain management in these patients with altered states of consciousness. Finally, the relationship between spasticity and treatment (i.e., pharmacological and physical therapy) should be further investigated in order to improve clinical care. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact: Managing spasticity at first signs could improve rehabilitation of patients with disorders of consciousness and maximize their chances of recovery. In addition, decreasing this trouble could allow a better quality of life for these non-communicative patients. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring consciousness in coma and related states
Di Perri, Carol; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg et al

in World Journal of Radiology (2014), 6(8),

Consciousness is a prismatic and ambiguous concept that still eludes any universal definition. Severe acquired brain injuries resulting in a disorder of consciousness (DOC) provide a model from which ... [more ▼]

Consciousness is a prismatic and ambiguous concept that still eludes any universal definition. Severe acquired brain injuries resulting in a disorder of consciousness (DOC) provide a model from which insights into consciousness can be drawn. A number of recent studies highlight the difficulty in making a diagnosis in patients with DOC based only on behavioral assessments. Here we aim to provide an overview of how neuroimaging techniques can help assess patients with DOC. Such techniques are expected to facilitate a more accurate understanding of brain function in states of unconsciousness and to improve the evaluation of the patient’s cognitive abilities by providing both diagnostic and prognostic indicators. [less ▲]

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See detailHow tDCS can help patients with disorders of consciousness?
Thibaut, Aurore ULg

Conference (2014, July)

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See detailDiagnostic precision of PET imaging and functional MRI in disorders of consciousness: a clinical validation study
Stender, Johan; Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg et al

in Lancet Neurology (2014)

Background: Bedside clinical examinations can have high rates of misdiagnosis of unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (vegetative state) or minimally conscious state. The diagnostic and prognostic usefulness ... [more ▼]

Background: Bedside clinical examinations can have high rates of misdiagnosis of unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (vegetative state) or minimally conscious state. The diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of neuroimaging-based approaches has not been established in a clinical setting. We did a validation study of two neuroimaging-based diagnostic methods: PET imaging and functional MRI (fMRI). Methods: For this clinical validation study, we included patients referred to the University Hospital of Liège, Belgium, between January, 2008, and June, 2012, who were diagnosed by our unit with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, locked-in syndrome, or minimally conscious state with traumatic or non-traumatic causes. We did repeated standardised clinical assessments with the Coma Recovery Scale—Revised (CRS—R), cerebral 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, and fMRI during mental activation tasks. We calculated the diagnostic accuracy of both imaging methods with CRS—R diagnosis as reference. We assessed outcome after 12 months with the Glasgow Outcome Scale—Extended. Findings: We included 41 patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, four with locked-in syndrome, and 81 in a minimally conscious state (48=traumatic, 78=non-traumatic; 110=chronic, 16=subacute). 18F-FDG PET had high sensitivity for identification of patients in a minimally conscious state (93%, 95% CI 85—98) and high congruence (85%, 77—90) with behavioural CRS—R scores. The active fMRI method was less sensitive at diagnosis of a minimally conscious state (45%, 30—61) and had lower overall congruence with behavioural scores (63%, 51—73) than PET imaging. 18F-FDG PET correctly predicted outcome in 75 of 102 patients (74%, 64—81), and fMRI in 36 of 65 patients (56%, 43—67). 13 of 42 (32%) of the behaviourally unresponsive patients (ie, diagnosed as unresponsive with CRS—R) showed brain activity compatible with (minimal) consciousness (ie, activity associated with consciousness, but diminished compared with fully conscious individuals) on at least one neuroimaging test; 69% of these (9 of 13) patients subsequently recovered consciousness. Interpretation: Cerebral 18F-FDG PET could be used to complement bedside examinations and predict long-term recovery of patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. Active fMRI might also be useful for differential diagnosis, but seems to be less accurate. Funding: The Belgian National Funds for Scientific Research (FNRS), Fonds Léon Fredericq, the European Commission, the James McDonnell Foundation, the Mind Science Foundation, the French Speaking Community Concerted Research Action, the University of Copenhagen, and the University of Liège. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of zolpidem in chronic disorders of consciousness: a prospective open-label study.
Thonnard, Marie ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg et al

in Functional Neurology (2014)

Zolpidem has been reported as an "awakening drug" in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). We here present the results of a prospective openlabel study in chronic DOC patients. Sixty ... [more ▼]

Zolpidem has been reported as an "awakening drug" in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). We here present the results of a prospective openlabel study in chronic DOC patients. Sixty patients (35±15 years; 18 females; mean time since insult ± SD: 4±5.5 years; 31 with traumatic etiology) with a diagnosis of vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (n=28) or minimally conscious state (n=32) were behaviorally assessed using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) before and one hour after administration of 10 mg of zolpidem. At the group level, the diagnosis did not change after intake of zolpidem (p=0.10) and CRS-R total scores decreased (p=0.01). Twelve patients (20%) showed improved behaviors and/or CRS-R total scores after zolpidem administration but in only one patient was the diagnosis after zolpidem intake found to show a significant improvement (functional object use), which suggested a change of diagnosis. However, in this patient, a double-blind placebo-controlled trial was performed in order to better specify the effects of zolpidem, but the patient, on this trial, failed to show any clinical improvements. The present open-label study therefore failed to show any clinically significant improvement (i.e., change of Effect of zolpidem in chronic disorders of consciousness: a prospective open-label study diagnosis) in any of the 60 studied chronic DOC patients. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing consciousness in coma and related states using transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography.
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Annales Françaises d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation (2014)

Thanks to advances in medical care, an increased number of patients recover from coma. However, some remain in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome or in a minimally conscious state. Detection of ... [more ▼]

Thanks to advances in medical care, an increased number of patients recover from coma. However, some remain in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome or in a minimally conscious state. Detection of awareness in severely brain-injured patients is challenging because it relies on behavioral assessments, which can be affected by motor, sensory and cognitive impairments of the patients. Other means of evaluation are needed to improve the accuracy of the diagnosis in this challenging population. We will here review the different altered states of consciousness occurring after severe brain damage, and explain the difficulties associated with behavioral assessment of consciousness. We will then describe a non-invasive technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG), which has allowed us to detect the presence or absence of consciousness in different physiological, pathological and pharmacological states. Some potential underlying mechanisms of the loss of consciousness will then be discussed. In conclusion, TMS-EEG is highly promising in identifying markers of consciousness at the individual level and might be of great value for clinicians in the assessment of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailNociception coma scale-revised scores correlate with metabolism in the anterior cingulate cortex.
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie et al

in Neurorehabilitation and neural repair (2014), 28(2), 149-52

BACKGROUND: . The Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R) was recently validated to assess possible pain perception in patients with disorders of consciousness. OBJECTIVE: . To identify correlations ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: . The Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R) was recently validated to assess possible pain perception in patients with disorders of consciousness. OBJECTIVE: . To identify correlations between cerebral glucose metabolism and NCS-R total scores. METHODS: . [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, NCS-R, and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised assessments were performed in 49 patients with disorders of consciousness. RESULTS: . We identified a significant positive correlation between NCS-R total scores and metabolism in the posterior part of the anterior cingulate cortex, known to be involved in pain processing. No other cluster reached significance. No significant effect of clinical diagnosis (vegetative/unresponsive vs minimally conscious states), etiology or interval since insult was observed. CONCLUSIONS: . Our data support the hypothesis that the NCS-R total scores are related to cortical processing of nociception and may constitute an appropriate behavioral tool to assess, monitor, and treat possible pain in brain-damaged noncommunicative patients with disorders of consciousness. Future studies using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging should investigate the correlation between NCS-R scores and brain activation in response to noxious stimulation at the single-subject level. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of visual fixatio in vegetative and minimally conscious states
Di, Haibo; Nie, Yunzhi; Hu, Xiaohu et al

in BMC Neurology (2014), 14(147),

Background: Visual fixation plays a key role in the differentiation between vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness (VS/UWS) syndrome and minimally conscious state (MCS). However, the use of different ... [more ▼]

Background: Visual fixation plays a key role in the differentiation between vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness (VS/UWS) syndrome and minimally conscious state (MCS). However, the use of different stimuli changes the frequency of visual fixation occured in patients, thereby possibly affecting the accuracy of the diagnosis. In order to establish a standardized assessment of visual fixation in patients in disorders of consciousness (DOC), we compared the frequency of visual fixation elicited by mirror,a ball and a light. Method: Visual fixation was assessed in eighty-one post-comatose patients diagnosed with a MCS or VS/UWS. Occurrence of fixation to different stimuli was analysis used Chi-square testing. Result: 40 (49%) out of the 81 patients showed fixation to visual stimuli. Among those, significantly more patients (39, 48%) had visual fixation elicited by mirror compared to a ball (23, 28%) and mirror compared to a light (20, 25%).Conclusion: The use of a mirror during the assessment of visual fixation showed higher positive response rate, compared to other stimuli in eliciting a visual fixating response. Therefore, fixation elicited by a mirror can be a very sensitive and accurate test to differentiate the two disorders of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailPain issues in disorders of consciousness
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Wythe, John et al

in Brain Injury (2014), 28(9), 1202-1208

Background: The assessment of pain and nociception in non-communicative patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) is a real challenge for clinicians. It is, therefore, important to develop sensitive ... [more ▼]

Background: The assessment of pain and nociception in non-communicative patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) is a real challenge for clinicians. It is, therefore, important to develop sensitive standardized tools usable at the bedside. Objectives: This review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge about pain processing and assessment in patients with DOC. Methods: A search was performed on PubMed using MeSH terms including vegetative state, unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, minimally conscious state, consciousness disorders, pain, nociception, neuroimaging and pain assessment. Results: Neuroimaging studies investigating pain processing in patients with DOC and their implication for clinicians are reviewed. Current works on the development of standardized and sensitive tools for assessing nociception are described. Conclusion: The suggested pain perception capacity highlighted by neuroimaging studies in patients in a MCS and in some patients in a VS/UWS supports the idea that these patients need analgesic treatment and monitoring. The first tool which has been developed to assess nociception and pain in patients with DOC is the NCS. Its revised version represents a rapid, standardized and sensitive scale which can be easily implemented in a clinical setting. Complementary pain assessments are also under validation in order to offer more options to clinicians. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative rates of brain glucose metabolism distinguish minimally conscious from vegetative state patients
Stender, Johan; Kupers, Ron; Rodell, Anders et al

in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism (2014)

The differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc ... [more ▼]

The differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) declines when consciousness is lost, and may reveal the residual cognitive function of these patients. However, no quantitative comparisons of cerebral glucose metabolism in VS/UWS and MCS have yet been reported. We calculated the regional and whole-brain CMRglc of 41 patients in the states of VS/UWS (n = 14), MCS (n = 21) or emergence from MCS (EMCS, n = 6), and healthy volunteers (n = 29). Global cortical CMRglc in VS/UWS and MCS averaged 42% and 55% of normal, respectively. Differences between VS/UWS and MCS were most pronounced in the frontoparietal cortex, at 42% and 60% of normal. In brainstem and thalamus, metabolism declined equally in the two conditions. In EMCS, metabolic rates were indistinguishable from those of MCS. Ordinal logistic regression predicted that patients are likely to emerge into MCS at CMRglc above 45% of normal. Receiver-operating characteristics showed that patients in MCS and VS/UWS can be differentiated with 82% accuracy, based on cortical metabolism. Together these results reveal a significant correlation between whole-brain energy metabolism and level of consciousness, suggesting that quantitative values of CMRglc reveal consciousness in severely brain-injured patients. [less ▲]

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See detailPositron emission tomography imaging in altered states of consciousness: Coma, sleep and hypnosis
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg; Stender, Johan et al

in Dierckx, Rudi; Otte, Andreas; Vries, Erik (Eds.) et al PET and SPECT in Neurology (2014)

Positron emission tomography (PET) allows studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow and has been widely used to investigate physiological mechanisms underlying altered states of consciousness. The aim ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) allows studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow and has been widely used to investigate physiological mechanisms underlying altered states of consciousness. The aim of this chapter is to review the current literature on brain metabolism during physiological or pathological loss of consciousness including studies on disorders of consciousness arising from severe brain injury (vegetative/unresponsive or minimally conscious states), and related non-pathological conditions such as sleep and hypnotic states. Identifying brain areas specifically involved in conscious processing, these studies have contributed to our understanding of the underlying physiology of consciousness. The precuneal and cingulate cortices, for example, seem to be key areas for maintaining consciousness awareness. Other areas such as hypothalamus, amygdala or the temporo-occipital cortex seem to play a role in different states of unconsciousness such as rapid eye movement sleep and hypnosis. PET studies permit a better comprehension of the loss of consciousness, and focus the implication of specific neural areas and networks in pathologically (vegetative/unresponsive or minimally conscious states), physiologically (sleep), and hypnotically altered states of consciousness. [less ▲]

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