References of "Therrien, René"
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See detailDevelopping a physically based groundwater vulnerability concept in a DPSIR framework
Beaujean, Jean ULg; Brouyère, Serge ULg; Lemieux, Jean-Michel et al

Conference (2014, September 15)

A general physically based method is presented to assess vulnerability of groundwater to external pressures with respect to quality and/or quantity issues. In the vulnerability assessments, many ... [more ▼]

A general physically based method is presented to assess vulnerability of groundwater to external pressures with respect to quality and/or quantity issues. In the vulnerability assessments, many scientific authors agree nowadays that ‘physically based’ methods must be preferred to traditional approaches based on empirical overlay and index methods where physical attributes are often mixed with implicitly embedded conventional priorities. Results from one or another of these last methods can consequently be very dissimilar for a given case study and decision makers are losing confidence in these tools. A methodology is proposed to reframe the groundwater vulnerability assessment in a Pressure-State-Impact causal chain that is familiar to decision makers. The DPSIR framework, for describing interactions between society and the environment, defines a chain of Drivers that exert Pressures on the State of a given resource, such as water, which then generates an Impact that will require an appropriate Response (Kristensen, 2004). The concept of groundwater vulnerability assessment considered here is based on the calculation of sensitivity coefficients for a user-defined groundwater state for which several physically-based indicators are proposed. These sensitivity coefficients reflect the easiness with which the groundwater state transmits pressures into impacts. They are grouped into a vulnerability matrix of pressures and impacts that quantify vulnerability for every combination of causal links identified in the DPSIR chain. For that reason, the sensitivity coefficients are converted to vulnerability, using the concept of ‘falling below a given threshold’, which is commonly used in socioeconomic sciences (Luers et al. 2003). Outside the careful selection of the sensitivity analysis method that can significantly influence the computational effort (Beaujean et al., 2013), emphasis will be given to the illustration of the general methodology on a simple case (of an alluvial aquifer with concerns related to water supply) demonstrating the potential use of this general and physically based vulnerability assessment method. While the methodology is general, the choice of causal chains has to be made prior to the calculation. The vulnerability is also related to a damaged state and is related to the ‘distance’ between the current state and a given threshold. This choice is arbitrary such that the vulnerability is sensitive to the choice of the threshold. The framework is general and, when applied to water, can include states that are not limited to quality such as, for example, water quantity and availability. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysically Based Groundwater Vulnerability Assessment Using Sensitivity Analysis Methods
Beaujean, Jean ULg; Lemieux, Jean-Michel; Dassargues, Alain ULg et al

in Ground Water (2013), 52(6), 864-874

A general physically based method is presented to assess the vulnerability of groundwater to external pressures by numerical simulation of groundwater flow. The concept of groundwater vulnerability ... [more ▼]

A general physically based method is presented to assess the vulnerability of groundwater to external pressures by numerical simulation of groundwater flow. The concept of groundwater vulnerability assessment considered here is based on the calculation of sensitivity coefficients for a user-defined groundwater state for which we propose several physically based indicators. Two sensitivity analysis methods are presented: the sensitivity equation method and the adjoint operator method. We show how careful selection of a method can significantly minimize the computational effort. An illustration of the general methodology is presented for the Herten aquifer analog (Germany). This application to a simple, yet insightful, case demonstrates the potential use of this general and physically based vulnerability assessment method to complex aquifers. [less ▲]

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See detailImproving groundwater flow model conceptualisation and calibration with electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential methods
Robert, Tanguy ULg; Therrien, René; Lemieux, Jean-Michel et al

Conference (2011, September 19)

Developing a conceptual model for groundwater flow requires knowledge on the distribution of geological materials, which generally comes from geological observations on outcrops and boreholes, from the ... [more ▼]

Developing a conceptual model for groundwater flow requires knowledge on the distribution of geological materials, which generally comes from geological observations on outcrops and boreholes, from the interpretation of hydraulic tests or from geophysical surveys. The identification of spatial structures in the subsurface, such as preferential flow paths created by fractured zones, is also critical in developing a reliable conceptual model but it is difficult to achieve. Geophysical methods have been widely used to map the subsurface distribution of geological materials. Recent developments in geophysics, such as the increased use of joint inversion of geophysical and hydrogeological data, have further allowed to quantify the hydraulic conductivity of geological materials. The objective of our work is to demonstrate that the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and the self-potential (SP) methods can improve both the conceptual model developed for groundwater flow systems and the calibration of the corresponding groundwater flow model. The use of the two geophysical methods, combined with a groundwater flow model, is presented for a fractured limestone aquifer. The self-potential method relies on passive measurements of the ambient electrical potential at ground surface or in boreholes. One of the mechanisms responsible for the measured signal measured is the transport of dissolved ions with groundwater flow. When this electrokinetic effect is the dominant contribution, the resulting signal is called the streaming potential and it contains information about groundwater fluxes that can be useful to calibrate groundwater flow models. The solution to the SP forward problem was added to the HydroGeoSphere model, which simulates 3D groundwater flow and solute transport in porous media, including fractured geological formations. With this addition, the model can calculate the self-potential signal associated with groundwater flow, given the distribution of Darcy fluxes resulting from the forward flow solution and the electrical resistivity that is, for example, outputted by ERT data inversion. Darcy fluxes are transformed into sources of electrical current by using the streaming potential coupling coefficient. This parameter can be measured either in the laboratory or in-situ from the self-potential signal between two locations where the depth of the water table is known, such as observation wells. We used here both ERT and SP to develop a conceptual model for groundwater flow in a typical carboniferous limestone syncline in South Belgium. The rolling topography in the investigated area results from a succession of calcareous valleys (synclines) and sandstone crests (anticlines). The calcareous synclines form aquifers that are very complex since they are highly fractured and even karstified. A typical calcareous syncline has a width of about 800 m and, using ERT, we could subdivide the syncline into zones of different hydraulic conductivity, based on the degree of fracturation. The zones are oriented along the axis of the syncline and their width ranges between 10 and 40 m. The ERT profiles showed that there is a highly conductive zone, in terms of electrical conductivity, near the syncline fold axis. That zone is interpreted as being highly fractured. Other conductive zones are located symmetrically along both flanks of the calcareous syncline, with respect to the syncline fold axis. The main flow direction is along the axis of the syncline, towards a nearby river. The SP raw signals also showed that, locally, there is a second flow component perpendicular to the axis of the syncline, with groundwater flowing from the flanks of the syncline towards the axis. The conceptual groundwater flow model developed here includes the zones identified with ERT, which were then incorporated into the numerical model. The SP signals were inverted with PEST to calibrate the hydraulic conductivity value of the different zones. HydroGeoSphere was therefore used to simulate first groundwater flow and then the associated self-potential signals in an iterative process. At the start of an iteration, HydroGeoSphere solves the groundwater flow equation given one particular set of hydraulic conductivities and calculates the resulting Darcy fluxes. These fluxes are transformed into sources of electrical current assuming that the electrokinetic effect is the dominant contribution of the SP signals. HydroGeoSphere then calculates the distribution of self-potential given the sources of electrical current and the distribution of electrical resistivity. The hydraulic conductivity values of the zones are then modified and the iteration continues until the model reproduces the measured self-potential signal. [less ▲]

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See detailImproving Groundwater Flow Model Conceptualisation and Calibration with ERT and Self-potential Methods
Robert, Tanguy ULg; Therrien, René; Lemieux, Jean-Michel et al

in EarthDoc - Near Surface 2011 – 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics (2011, September 14)

The self-potential (SP) method relies on passive measurements of the ambient electrical potential at the ground surface or in boreholes. When the electrokinetic effect is the dominant contribution, the ... [more ▼]

The self-potential (SP) method relies on passive measurements of the ambient electrical potential at the ground surface or in boreholes. When the electrokinetic effect is the dominant contribution, the resulting signal is called the streaming potential and contains information about groundwater fluxes that can be useful for calibration of groundwater flow models. The streaming potential forward equation was implemented in the HydroGeoSphere model, which simulates 3D groundwater flow and solute transport in porous media, including fractured geological formations. HydroGeoSphere is able to calculate the streaming potential given a distribution of Darcy velocity and electrical resistivity. Since groundwater flow modelling relies on a conceptual model, prior information on the distribution of the geological units and hydraulic conductivity at the site is mandatory. However, this information is often scarce or missing. In this work, we use the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and the SP methods as an additional source of information for building the groundwater flow model. ERT is used to identify the location of fractured zones in a fractured and karstified calcareous aquifer of South Belgium. The SP signal is used with PEST in order to calibrate the groundwater flow model and better constrain the hydraulic conductivity of the fractured zones. [less ▲]

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See detailImproved automatic calibration of groundwater flow models using self-potential measurements
Robert, Tanguy ULg; Therrien, René; Lemieux, Jean-Michel et al

Conference (2011, April 11)

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See detailHow can large scale integrated surface - subsurface hydrological model be used to evaluate long term climate change impact on groundwater reserves
Goderniaux, Pascal ULg; Brouyère, Serge ULg; Fowler, Hayley J. et al

in Proceeding of the 7th international conference on calibration and reliability in groundwater modeling (2009, September)

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See detailLarge scale surface – subsurface hydrological model to assess climate change impacts on groundwater reserves
Goderniaux, Pascal ULg; Brouyère, Serge ULg; Fowler, Hayley J. et al

in Journal of Hydrology (2009), 373

Estimating the impacts of climate change on groundwater represents one of the most difficult challenges faced by water resources specialists. One difficulty is that simplifying the representation of the ... [more ▼]

Estimating the impacts of climate change on groundwater represents one of the most difficult challenges faced by water resources specialists. One difficulty is that simplifying the representation of the hydrological system often leads to discrepancies in projections. This study provides an improved methodology for the estimation of the impacts of climate change on groundwater reserves, where a physically-based surface – subsurface flow model is combined with advanced climate change scenarios for the Geer basin (465 km²), Belgium. Coupled surface–subsurface flow is simulated with the finite element model HydroGeoSphere. The simultaneous solution of surface and subsurface flow equations in HydroGeoSphere, as well as the internal calculation of the actual evapotranspiration as a function of the soil moisture at each node of the defined evaporative zone, improve the representation of interdependent processes like recharge, which is crucial in the context of climate change. More simple models or externally coupled models do not provide the same level of realism. Fully integrated surface – subsurface flow models have recently gained attention, but have not been used in the context of climate change impact studies. Climate change simulations were obtained from 6 regional climate model (RCM) scenarios assuming the SRES A2 emission (medium-high) scenario. These RCM scenarios were downscaled using a quantile mapping bias-correction technique that, rather than applying a correction only to the mean, forces the probability distributions of the control simulations of daily temperature and precipitation to match the observed distributions. The same corrections are then applied to RCM scenarios for the future. Climate change scenarios predict hotter and drier summer and warmer and wetter winters. The combined use of an integrated surface – subsurface modelling approach, a spatial representation of the evapotranspiration processes and sophisticated climate change scenarios improves the model realism and projections of climate change impacts on groundwater reserves. For the climatic scenarios considered, the integrated flow simulations show that significant decreases are expected in the groundwater levels (up to 8 meters) and in the surface water flow rates (between 9% and 33%) by 2080. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling of dual porosity media: comparisons of different techniques and evaluation of the impact on plume transport simulations
Brouyère, Serge ULg; Dassargues, Alain ULg; Therrien, René et al

in Stauffer, F.; Kinzelbach, W.; Kovar, K. (Eds.) et al Calibration and Reliability in Groundwater Modelling: Coping with Uncertainty (2000)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (16 ULg)