References of "Theatre, Emilie"
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See detailAn efficient algorithm to perform multiple testing in epistasis screening
Van Lishout, François ULg; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg; Gusareva, Elena ULg et al

in BMC Bioinformatics (2013), 14

Background: Research in epistasis or gene-gene interaction detection for human complex traits has grown over the last few years. It has been marked by promising methodological developments, improved ... [more ▼]

Background: Research in epistasis or gene-gene interaction detection for human complex traits has grown over the last few years. It has been marked by promising methodological developments, improved translation efforts of statistical epistasis to biological epistasis and attempts to integrate different omics information sources into the epistasis screening to enhance power. The quest for gene-gene interactions poses severe multiple-testing problems. In this context, the maxT algorithm is one technique to control the false-positive rate. However, the memory needed by this algorithm rises linearly with the amount of hypothesis tests. Gene-gene interaction studies will require a memory proportional to the squared number of SNPs. A genome-wide epistasis search would therefore require terabytes of memory. Hence, cache problems are likely to occur, increasing the computation time. In this work we present a new version of maxT, requiring an amount of memory independent from the number of genetic effects to be investigated. This algorithm was implemented in C++ in our epistasis screening software MBMDR-3.0.3. We evaluate the new implementation in terms of memory efficiency and speed using simulated data. The software is illustrated on real-life data for Crohn's disease. Results: In the case of a binary (affected/unaffected) trait, the parallel workflow of MBMDR-3.0.3 analyzes all gene-gene interactions with a dataset of 100,000 SNPs typed on 1000 individuals within 4 days and 9 hours, using 999 permutations of the trait to assess statistical significance, on a cluster composed of 10 blades, containing each four Quad-Core AMD Opteron Processor 2352 2.1 GHz. In the case of a continuous trait, a similar run takes 9 days. Our program found 14 SNP-SNP interactions with a multiple-testing corrected p-value of less than 0.05 on real-life Crohn's disease data. Conclusions: Our software is the first implementation of the MB-MDR methodology able to solve large-scale SNP-SNP interactions problems within a few days, without using much memory, while adequately controlling the type I error rates. A new implementation to reach genome-wide epistasis screening is under construction. In the context of Crohn's disease, MBMDR-3.0.3 could identify epistasis involving regions that are well known in the field and could be explained from a biological point of view. This demonstrates the power of our software to find relevant phenotype-genotype higher-order associations. [less ▲]

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See detailEpilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis and febrile seizures linked by common genetic variation around SCN1A.
Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B.; Matarin, Mar et al

in Brain : a journal of neurology (2013), 136(Pt 10), 3140-50

Epilepsy comprises several syndromes, amongst the most common being mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis are ... [more ▼]

Epilepsy comprises several syndromes, amongst the most common being mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis are typically drug-resistant, and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is frequently associated with important co-morbidities, mandating the search for better understanding and treatment. The cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is unknown, but there is an association with childhood febrile seizures. Several rarer epilepsies featuring febrile seizures are caused by mutations in SCN1A, which encodes a brain-expressed sodium channel subunit targeted by many anti-epileptic drugs. We undertook a genome-wide association study in 1018 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 7552 control subjects, with validation in an independent sample set comprising 959 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 3591 control subjects. To dissect out variants related to a history of febrile seizures, we tested cases with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with (overall n = 757) and without (overall n = 803) a history of febrile seizures. Meta-analysis revealed a genome-wide significant association for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures at the sodium channel gene cluster on chromosome 2q24.3 [rs7587026, within an intron of the SCN1A gene, P = 3.36 x 10(-9), odds ratio (A) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.26-1.59]. In a cohort of 172 individuals with febrile seizures, who did not develop epilepsy during prospective follow-up to age 13 years, and 6456 controls, no association was found for rs7587026 and febrile seizures. These findings suggest SCN1A involvement in a common epilepsy syndrome, give new direction to biological understanding of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures, and open avenues for investigation of prognostic factors and possible prevention of epilepsy in some children with febrile seizures. [less ▲]

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See detailHost-microbe interactions have shaped the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease.
Jostins, Luke; Ripke, Stephan; Weersma, Rinse K. et al

in Nature (2012), 491(7422), 119-24

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome ... [more ▼]

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses of these two diseases as separate phenotypes have implicated previously unsuspected mechanisms, such as autophagy, in their pathogenesis and showed that some IBD loci are shared with other inflammatory diseases. Here we expand on the knowledge of relevant pathways by undertaking a meta-analysis of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis genome-wide association scans, followed by extensive validation of significant findings, with a combined total of more than 75,000 cases and controls. We identify 71 new associations, for a total of 163 IBD loci, that meet genome-wide significance thresholds. Most loci contribute to both phenotypes, and both directional (consistently favouring one allele over the course of human history) and balancing (favouring the retention of both alleles within populations) selection effects are evident. Many IBD loci are also implicated in other immune-mediated disorders, most notably with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis. We also observe considerable overlap between susceptibility loci for IBD and mycobacterial infection. Gene co-expression network analysis emphasizes this relationship, with pathways shared between host responses to mycobacteria and those predisposing to IBD. [less ▲]

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See detailOverexpression of CD39 in mouse airways promotes bacteria induced inflammation
Theatre, Emilie ULg; Frederix, Kim; Guilmain, William et al

in Journal of Immunology (2012), 189(4), 1966-1974

In airways, the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase CD39 plays a central role in the regulation of physiological mucosal nucleotide concentrations and likely contributes to the control of ... [more ▼]

In airways, the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase CD39 plays a central role in the regulation of physiological mucosal nucleotide concentrations and likely contributes to the control of inflammation because accelerated ATP metabolism occurs in chronic inflammatory lung diseases.We sought to determine whether constant elevated CD39 activity in lung epithelia is sufficient to cause inflammation and whether this affects the response to acute LPS or Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposure. We generated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD39 under the control of the airway-specific Clara cell 10-kDa protein gene promoter. Transgenic mice did not develop any spontaneous lung inflammation. However, intratracheal instillation of LPS resulted in accelerated recruitment of neutrophils to the airways of transgenic mice. Macrophage clearance was delayed, and the amounts of CD8+ T and B cells were augmented. Increased levels of keratinocyte chemoattractant, IL-6, and RANTES were produced in transgenic lungs. Similarly, higher numbers of neutrophils and macrophages were found in the lungs of transgenic mice infected with P. aeruginosa, which correlated with improved bacteria clearance. The transgenic phenotype was partially and differentially restored by coinstillation of P2X1 or P2X7 receptor antagonists or of caffeine with LPS. Thus, a chronic increase of epithelial CD39 expression and activity promotes airway inflammation in response to bacterial challenge by enhancing P1 and P2 receptor activation. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Efficient Algorithm to Perform Multiple Testing in Epistasis Screening
Van Lishout, François ULg; Cattaert, Tom ULg; Mahachie John, Jestinah ULg et al

Conference (2011, December 13)

Background: Research in epistasis or gene-gene interaction detection for human complex traits has grown exponentially over the last few years. It has been marked by promising methodological developments ... [more ▼]

Background: Research in epistasis or gene-gene interaction detection for human complex traits has grown exponentially over the last few years. It has been marked by promising methodological developments, improved translation efforts of statistical epistasis to biological epistasis and attempts to integrate different omics information sources into the epistasis screening to enhance power. The quest for gene-gene interactions poses severe multiple-testing problems. In this context, the maxT algorithm is one technique to control the false-positive rate. However, the memory needed by this algorithm rises linearly with the amount of hypothesis tests. In main-effects detection, this is not a problem since the memory required is thus proportional to the number of SNPs. In contrast, gene-gene interaction studies will require a memory proportional to the squared amount of SNPs. A genome wide epistasis would therefore require terabytes of memory. Hence, cache problems are likely to occur, increasing the computation time. Methods: In this work we present a new version of maxT, requiring an amount of memory independent from the number of genetic effects to be investigated. This algorithm was implemented in C++ in our epistasis screening software MB-MDR-2.6.2 and compared to MB-MDR's first implementation as an R-package (Calle et al., Bioinformatics 2010). We evaluate the new implementation in terms of memory efficiency and speed using simulated data. The software is illustrated on real-life data for Crohn's disease. Results: The sequential version of MBMDR-2.6.2 is approximately 5,500 times faster than its R counterparts. The parallel version (tested on a cluster composed of 14 blades, containing each 4 quad-cores Intel Xeon CPU E5520@2.27 GHz) is approximately 900,000 times faster than the latter, for results of the same quality on the simulated data. It analyses all gene-gene interactions of a dataset of 100,000 SNPs typed on 1000 individuals within 4 days. Our program found 14 SNP-SNP interactions with a p-value less than 0.05 on the real-life Crohn’s disease data. Conclusions: Our software is able to solve large-scale SNP-SNP interactions problems within a few days, without using much memory. A new implementation to reach genome wide epistasis screening is under construction. In the context of Crohn's disease, MBMDR-2.6.2 found signal in regions well known in the field and our results could be explained from a biological point of view. This demonstrates the power of our software to find relevant phenotype-genotype associations. [less ▲]

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See detailA P2X Ion Channel-triggered NF-{kappa}B Pathway Enhances TNF-{alpha}-induced IL-8 Expression in Airway Epithelial Cells.
Theatre, Emilie ULg; Bours, Vincent ULg; Oury, Cécile ULg

in American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology (2009)

Extracellular ATP, acting at P2Y and P2X receptors, has recently been shown to contribute to airway inflammation. Using different epithelial cell models, this study shows that ATP promotes TNF-alpha ... [more ▼]

Extracellular ATP, acting at P2Y and P2X receptors, has recently been shown to contribute to airway inflammation. Using different epithelial cell models, this study shows that ATP promotes TNF-alpha-elicited IL-8 expression through P2X ion channel-triggered Ca(2+) entry, leading to CaMK-dependent IKK activation and binding of active p65 to IL-8 gene promoter. [less ▲]

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See detailInduction of nuclear factor-kappaB and its downstream genes by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta has a pro-apoptotic role in pancreatic beta cells
Ortis, Fernanda; Pirot, P.; Naamane, N. et al

in Diabetologia (2008), 51

IL-1beta and TNF-alpha contribute to pancreatic beta cell death in type 1 diabetes. Both cytokines activate the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), but recent observations suggest that ... [more ▼]

IL-1beta and TNF-alpha contribute to pancreatic beta cell death in type 1 diabetes. Both cytokines activate the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), but recent observations suggest that NF-kappaB blockade prevents IL-1beta + IFN-gamma- but not TNF-alpha + IFN-gamma-induced beta cell apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha on cell death and the pattern of NF-kappaB activation and global gene expression in beta cells. METHODS: Cell viability was measured after exposure to IL-1beta or to TNF-alpha alone or in combination with IFN-gamma, and blockade of NF-kappaB activation or protein synthesis. INS-1E cells exposed to IL-1beta or TNF-alpha in time course experiments were used for IkappaB kinase (IKK) activation assay, detection of p65 NF-kappaB by immunocytochemistry, real-time RT-PCR and microarray analysis. RESULTS: Blocking NF-kappaB activation protected beta cells against IL-1beta + IFNgamma- or TNFalpha + IFNgamma-induced apoptosis. Blocking de novo protein synthesis did not increase TNF-alpha- or IL-1beta-induced beta cell death, in line with the observations that cytokines induced the expression of the anti-apoptotic genes A20, Iap-2 and Xiap to a similar extent. Microarray analysis of INS-1E cells treated with IL-1beta or TNF-alpha showed similar patterns of gene expression. IL-1beta, however, induced a higher rate of expression of NF-kappaB target genes putatively involved in beta cell dysfunction and death and a stronger activation of the IKK complex, leading to an earlier translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: NF-kappaB activation in beta cells has a pro-apoptotic role following exposure not only to IL-1beta but also to TNF-alpha. The more marked beta cell death induced by IL-1beta is explained at least in part by higher intensity NF-kappaB activation, leading to increased transcription of key target genes. [less ▲]

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See detailSensitivity of intestinal fibroblasts to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-mediated apoptosis in Crohn's disease
Reenaers, Catherine ULg; Franchimont, Nathalie; Oury, Cécile ULg et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology (2008), 43

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See detailThe TNF/ADAM 17 system: implication of an ADAM 17 haplotype in the clinical response to infliximab in Crohn's disease
Dideberg, Vinciane ULg; Theatre, Emilie ULg; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in European Journal of Clinical Investigation (2007, May), 37(Suppl. 1), 79

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See detailThe Tnf/Adam 17 System: Implication of an Adam 17 Haplotype in the Clinical Response to Infliximab in Crohn's Disease
Dideberg, Vinciane ULg; Theatre, Emilie ULg; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in Pharmacogenetics and Genomics (2006), 16(10), 727-734

Infliximab, a chimeric anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antibody induces a clinical response in 70% of Crohn's disease patients and the response to infliximab therapy could be partially determined ... [more ▼]

Infliximab, a chimeric anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antibody induces a clinical response in 70% of Crohn's disease patients and the response to infliximab therapy could be partially determined by genetic factors. The implication of both transmembrane and soluble forms of the TNF-alpha in the mechanism of action of infliximab has been demonstrated. The aim of our work was first to perform a complete study of TNF variants role in the response to infliximab in Crohn's disease. Secondly, considering the role of ADAM 17 in TNF-alpha shedding, the ADAM 17 locus was also studied. The response to infliximab was evaluated in 222 Caucasian Crohn's disease patients with a luminal (n=160) or fistulizing (n=62) form of the disease. Clinical and biological response evaluation was based on the Crohn's Disease Activity Index score and C-reactive protein level evolutions, respectively. The entire TNF gene was sequenced on the complete cohort. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning the ADAM 17 locus were studied and haplotypes rebuilt. A clinical response was observed in 64% of the patients and biological response in 77.1% of patients. No association was found between the TNF gene and the response to infliximab. One haplotype in the ADAM 17 region was associated with a clinical response to infliximab in CD patients (adjusted P=0.045). In conclusion, our results exclude, with a reasonable power, an implication of the TNF gene in the response to infliximab in Crohn's disease, but reveal a potential role of the ADAM 17 gene in this response. [less ▲]

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