References of "Taton, Arnaud"
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See detailPlectolyngbya hodgsonii: a novel filamentous cyanobacterium from Antarctic lakes
Taton, Arnaud; Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Smarda, Jan et al

in Polar Biology (2011), 34

A special cluster of filamentous, false-branched cyanobacteria, isolated from littoral mat samples in coastal lakes of the Larsemann Hills region (coll. by D. Hodgson) was studied by a polyphasic approach ... [more ▼]

A special cluster of filamentous, false-branched cyanobacteria, isolated from littoral mat samples in coastal lakes of the Larsemann Hills region (coll. by D. Hodgson) was studied by a polyphasic approach. This morphotype has several characters corresponding to the traditional genera Leptolyngbya (morphology of trichomes), Pseudophormidium (type of false branching) or Schizothrix (occasional multiple arrangement of trichomes in the sheaths). However, this cluster of strains is distinctly isolated according to its phylogenetic position (based on 16S rRNA gene sequences), and thus, a separate generic classification is justified. The cytomorphology of this generic entity is also characteristic. Therefore, a new genus (Plectolyngbya with the type species P. hodgsonii) was described. [less ▲]

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See detailStructuring effects of climate-related environmental factors on Antarctic microbial mat communities
Verleyen, Elie; Sabbe, Koen; Hodgson, Dominic A et al

in Aquatic Microbial Ecology (2010), 59

Both ground-based and satellite data show that parts of Antarctica have entered a period of rapid climate change, which already affects the functioning and productivity of limnetic ecosystems. To predict ... [more ▼]

Both ground-based and satellite data show that parts of Antarctica have entered a period of rapid climate change, which already affects the functioning and productivity of limnetic ecosystems. To predict the consequences of future climate anomalies for lacustrine microbial communities, we not only need better baseline information on their biodiversity but also on the climaterelated environmental factors structuring these communities. Here we applied denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) to assess the genetic composition and distribution of Cyanobacteria and eukaryotes in 37 benthic microbial mat samples from east Antarctic lakes. The lakes were selected to span a wide range of environmental gradients governed by differences in lake morphology and chemical limnology across 5 ice-free oases. Sequence analysis of selected DGGE bands revealed a high degree of potential endemism among the Cyanobacteria (mainly represented by Oscillatoriales and Nostocales), and the presence of a variety of protists (alveolates, stramenopiles and green algae), fungi, tardigrades and nematodes, which corroborates previous microscopy-based observations. Variation partitioning analyses revealed that the microbial mat community structure is largely regulated by both geographical and local environmental factors of which salinity (and related variables), lake water depth and nutrient concentrations are of major importance. These 3 groups of environmental variables have previously been shown to change drastically in Antarctica in response to climate change. Together, these results have obvious consequences for predicting the trajectory of biodiversity under changing climate conditions and call for the continued assessment of the biodiversity of these unique ecosystems. [less ▲]

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See detailThe biodiversity of cyanobacteria in Antarctic microbial mats
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Fernandez-Carazo, Rafael; Zakhia, Frederic et al

Conference (2009)

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See detailCyanobacteria from benthic mats of Antarctic lakes as a source of new bioactivities
Biondi, Natascia; Tredici, Mario; Taton, Arnaud et al

in Journal of Applied Microbiology (2008), 105(1), 105-115

Aims: To exploit the cyanobacterial diversity of microbial mats growing in the benthic environment of Antarctic lakes for the discovery of novel antibiotic and antitumour activities. Methods and results ... [more ▼]

Aims: To exploit the cyanobacterial diversity of microbial mats growing in the benthic environment of Antarctic lakes for the discovery of novel antibiotic and antitumour activities. Methods and results: In all, 51 Antarctic cyanobacteria isolated from benthic mats were cultivated in the laboratory by optimizing temperature, irradiance and mixing. Productivity was generally very low (£60 mg l)1 d)1) with growth rates (l) in the range of 0Æ02–0Æ44 d)1. Growth rates were limited by photosensitivity, sensitivity to air bubbling, polysaccharide production or cell aggregation. Despite this, 126 extracts were prepared from 48 strains and screened for antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. Seventeen cyanobacteria showed antimicrobial activity (against the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus or the yeast Cryptococcus neoformans), and 25 were cytotoxic. The bioactivities were not in accordance with the phylogenetic grouping, but rather strain-specific. One active strain was cultivated in a 10-l photobioreactor. Conclusions: Isolation and mass cultivation of Antarctic cyanobacteria and LCMS (liquid chromatography ⁄ mass spectrometry) fractionation of extracts from a subset of those strains (hits) that exhibited relatively potent antibacterial and ⁄ or antifungal activities, evidenced a chemical novelty worthy of further investigation. Significance and impact of the study: Development of isolation, cultivation and screening methods for Antarctic cyanobacteria has led to the discovery of strains endowed with interesting antimicrobial and antitumour activities. [less ▲]

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See detailCyanobacteria in microbial mats of Antarctic lakes (East Antarctica) - A microscopical approach
Taton, Arnaud; Hoffmann, Lucien; Wilmotte, Annick ULg

in Algological Studies (2008), 168

The cyanobacterial diversity in microbial mats of 56 lakes located in the Larsemann Hills and Bølingen Islands (East Antarctica) was studied by light microscopy. Thirty taxa belonging to 13 genera of ... [more ▼]

The cyanobacterial diversity in microbial mats of 56 lakes located in the Larsemann Hills and Bølingen Islands (East Antarctica) was studied by light microscopy. Thirty taxa belonging to 13 genera of Chroococcales, Oscillatoriales and Nostocales were described. Photomicrographs of the different taxa are provided and their taxonomical assignment as well as their ecology and distribution are discussed. In addition, a semi-quantitative estimation of the abundance of the different morphotypes in the samples was realized and correlated with the mat physiognomy. [less ▲]

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See detailCyanobacteria in cold environments
Zakhia, Frederic; Jungblut, Anne-Dorothee; Taton, Arnaud et al

in Margesin, Rosi; Schinner, Frederic; Marx, Jean-Claude (Eds.) et al 'Psychrophiles: from Biodiversity to Biotechnology (2007)

Cyanobacteria evolved under the harsh conditions of the Precambrian and their modern representatives retain a remarkable ability to adapt to and survive within extreme conditions. They dominate ... [more ▼]

Cyanobacteria evolved under the harsh conditions of the Precambrian and their modern representatives retain a remarkable ability to adapt to and survive within extreme conditions. They dominate terrestrial and freshwater cold ecosystems of the Arctic, Antarctic and alpine regions, even though they do not seem to be specifically adapted to optimal growth at low temperatures. They play a major ecological role as they often are primary colonisers of substrates and major primary producers in these ecosystems. The application of molecular tools in combination with classic morphological techniques has begun to provide new insights into the real diversity of cyanobacteria and their biogeographical distribution in cold environments. Our survey of recent studies suggests complex distributional patterns of cyanobacteria, with cosmopolitan, endemic, and habitat-specific genotypes. This ongoing research will help to identify specific geographical areas that have unique microbial communities. However, many more studies are needed to unravel the enormous diversity of cyanobacteria and to better define their biogeographical patterns in cold environments. This is an urgent task in view of the climatic changes that will undoubtedly alter the structure and functioning of microbial communities in polar and alpine ecosystems. [less ▲]

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See detailBiogeographic trends in Antarctic lake communities
Gibson, John; Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Taton, Arnaud et al

in Bergstrom, Dana; Convey, Peter; Huiskes, Ad HL (Eds.) Trends in Antarctic terrestrial and limnetic ecosystems (2006)

The basic biogeographic zones proposed many years ago – the Subantarctic islands, Maritime Antarctica and Continental Antarctica – continue to hold up, though they cannot be seen as absolute dividers of ... [more ▼]

The basic biogeographic zones proposed many years ago – the Subantarctic islands, Maritime Antarctica and Continental Antarctica – continue to hold up, though they cannot be seen as absolute dividers of biodiversity. For example, subantarctic Macquarie Island appears to be biogeographically separate from the islands of the Kerguelen Province, and on the continent there are species that are present in lakes of more than one zone. Furthermore, there are numerous lake environments that have yet to be investigated, and it is probable that some of these lakes could turn up surprises that will bring into question these basic divisions. An important question to be answered is whether these biogeographic zones reflect climate attributes, or whether they were moulded long ago by barriers to dispersal. Again, our imperfect knowledge of Antarctic lacustrine biogeography means that this question cannot at present be answered. However, as discussed elsewhere in this volume (Chown and Convey), there are indications of a strong biogeographical boundary for terrestrial species between the Maritime and Continental Antarctic zones. A palaeolimnological approach will assist in answering this question: understanding how Antarctic biogeography has developed through time will provide necessary insights into current distributions. A prime example is the occurrence of the copepod Boeckella poppei in Beaver Lake. Pugh et al. (2002) initially concluded that this species was an anthropogenic introduction, then Bayly et al. (2003) provided morphological evidence for long habitation in the area of Beaver Lake. Recent palaeolimnological work has shown that the species has been present in nearby Lake Terrasovoje for at least 9000 yrs (L. Cromer, A. Bissett, J. Gibson and K. Swadling, unpublished data). Even though this lake has only existed in the Holocene, cosmogenic exposure dates in the same area of exposed rock can exceed 106 years (D. Gore and D. White, personal communication). From these observations it can be concluded that Boeckella poppei has been associated with the Beaver Lake area for at least the entire Holocene and probably well back into the Pleistocene, and that its occurrence outside its ‘preferred’ biogeographical zone (Maritime Antarctica) is not a reflection of current climate, rather of history. The majority of our knowledge regarding Antarctic lacustrine biodiversity and biogeography has come from classic taxonomic studies, where the morphology (or biochemistry for bacteria) has been of greatest importance. In many cases this has led to questionable identification, correct identification of species is paramount if the true biodiversity and biogeography of Antarctica is to be deduced. It is only in the last few years that the more objective approach of molecular genetics has been applied to Antarctic lacustrine organisms, and then only for more cryptic groups, such as bacteria and cyanobacteria. As more samples and organisms are studied by these methods it is likely that new relationships between species distributions will be found. Due to the limited number of species in Antarctica (compared to more temperate zones), it may be possible in the future to record the make-up of selected genes of most, if not all, of the biota, which will allow more precise analysis. There is increasing evidence for endemism amongst the inhabitants of lakes both on the Antarctic continent and the subantarctic islands, from bacteria to crustacea. Use of molecular genetic techniques to identify more cryptic species will most likely add to the list of putative endemics. It is clear, however, that recent colonisation and current climate also play important roles in the distribution of the biota, as most of the lakes in Antarctica are of relatively recent (Holocene) origin. Colonising species have to be adapted to transport from source areas, which can either involve inter- or intra-continental movement, as well as survival on arrival at potential habitat. Flexibility in nutritional and habitat requirements is an important factor in determining whether a species will be a successful coloniser. The buffering to environmental extremes provided by the liquid water habitat means that conditions further south will not be as harsh as those experienced by their terrestrial counterparts. As the climate changes in the future, it will be interesting to note the effects of these changes on the lacustrine biota. Will new species colonise the Antarctic Peninsula where temperatures are warming? In the longer term, the biogeography of Antarctic lakes will continue to be dynamic. New species will arrive, others will become extinct. The biogeographic zones long-proposed may continue to hold, though more precise knowledge of current distributions and responses to climate change may refine our view. [less ▲]

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See detailSalinity, depth and the structure and composition of microbial mats in continental Antarctic lakes
Sabbe, Koen; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Verleyen, Elie et al

in Freshwater Biology (2004), 49(3), 296-319

1. Lakes and ponds in the Larsemann Hills and Bolingen Islands (East-Antarctica) were characterised by cyanobacteria-dominated, benthic microbial mats. A 56-lake dataset representing the limnological ... [more ▼]

1. Lakes and ponds in the Larsemann Hills and Bolingen Islands (East-Antarctica) were characterised by cyanobacteria-dominated, benthic microbial mats. A 56-lake dataset representing the limnological diversity among the more than 150 lakes and ponds in the region was developed to identify and quantify the abiotic conditions associated with cyanobacterial and diatom communities. 2. Limnological diversity in the lakes of the Larsemann Hills and Bolingen Islands was associated primarily with conductivity and conductivity-related variables (concentrations of major ions and alkalinity), and variation in lake morphometry (depth, catchment and lake area). Low concentrations of pigments, phosphate, nitrogen, DOC and TOC in the water column of most lakes suggest extremely low water column productivity and hence high water clarity, and may thus contribute to the ecological success of benthic microbial mats in this region. 3. Benthic communities consisted of prostrate and sometimes finely laminated mats, flake mats, epilithic and interstitial microbial mats. Mat physiognomy and carotenoid/chlorophyll ratios were strongly related to lake depth, but not to conductivity. 4. Morphological-taxonomic analyses revealed the presence of 26 diatom morphospecies and 33 cyanobacterial morphotypes. Mats of shallow lakes (interstitial and flake mats) and those of deeper lakes (prostrate mats) were characterised by different dominant cyanobacterial morphotypes. No relationship was found between the distribution of these morphotypes and conductivity. In contrast, variation in diatom species composition was strongly related to both lake depth and conductivity. Shallow ponds were mainly characterised by aerial diatoms (e.g. Diadesmis cf. perpusilla and Hantzschia spp.). In deep lakes, communities were dominated by Psammothidium abundans and Stauroforma inermis. Lakes with conductivities higher than +/-1.5 mS cm(-1) became susceptible to freezing out of salts and hence pronounced conductivity fluctuations. In these lakes P. abundans and S. inermis were replaced by Amphora veneta. Stomatocysts were important only in shallow freshwater lakes. 5. Ice cover influenced microbial mat structure and composition both directly by physical disturbance in shallow lakes and by influencing light availability in deeper lakes, as well as indirectly by generating conductivity increases and promoting the development of seasonal anoxia. 6. The relationships between diatom species composition and conductivity, and diatom species composition and depth, were statistically significant. Transfer functions based on these data can therefore be used in paleolimnological reconstruction to infer changes in the precipitation-evaporation balance in continental Antarctic lakes. [less ▲]

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