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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXIV. CoRoT-25b and CoRoT-26b: two low-density giant planets
Almenara, J. M.; Bouchy, F.; Gaulme, P. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 555

We report the discovery of two transiting exoplanets, CoRoT-25b and CoRoT-26b, both of low density, one of which is in the Saturn mass-regime. For each star, ground-based complementary observations ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of two transiting exoplanets, CoRoT-25b and CoRoT-26b, both of low density, one of which is in the Saturn mass-regime. For each star, ground-based complementary observations through optical photometry and radial velocity measurements secured the planetary nature of the transiting body and allowed us to fully characterize them. For CoRoT-25b we found a planetary mass of 0.27 ± 0.04 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], a radius of 1.08[SUB]-0.10[/SUB][SUP]+0.3[/SUP] R[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and hence a mean density of 0.15[SUB]-0.06[/SUB][SUP]+0.15[/SUP] g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. The planet orbits an F9 main-sequence star in a 4.86-day period, that has a V magnitude of 15.0, solar metallicity, and an age of 4.5[SUB]-2.0[/SUB][SUP]+1.8[/SUP]-Gyr. CoRoT-26b orbits a slightly evolved G5 star of 9.06 ± 1.5-Gyr age in a 4.20-day period that hassolar metallicity and a V magnitude of 15.8. With a mass of 0.52 ± 0.05 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], a radius of 1.26[SUB]-0.07[/SUB][SUP]+0.13[/SUP] R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], and a mean density of 0.28[SUB]-0.07[/SUB][SUP]+0.09[/SUP] g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP], it belongs to the low-mass hot-Jupiter population. Planetary evolution models allowed us to estimate a core mass of a few tens of Earth mass for the two planets with heavy-element mass fractions of 0.52[SUB]-0.15[/SUB][SUP]+0.08[/SUP] and 0.26[SUB]-0.08[/SUB][SUP]+0.05[/SUP], respectively, assuming that a small fraction of the incoming flux is dissipated at the center of the planet. In addition, these models indicate that CoRoT-26b is anomalously large compared with what standard models could account for, indicating that dissipation from stellar heating could cause this size. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Partly based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal and La Silla, Chile in programs 083.C-0690(A), 184.C-0639. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XXI. CoRoT-19b: A low density planet orbiting an old inactive F9V-star
Guenther, E. W.; Diaz, R. F.; Gazzano, J-C et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 537

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to ... [more ▼]

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to achieve a very high photometric accuracy. By combining CoRoT data with high-precision radial velocity measurements, we derive precise planetary radii and masses. We report the discovery of CoRoT-19b, a gas-giant planet transiting an old, inactive F9V-type star with a period of four days. After excluding alternative physical configurations mimicking a planetary transit signal, we determine the radius and mass of the planet by combining CoRoT photometry with high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the echelle spectrographs SOPHIE, HARPS, FIES, and SANDIFORD. To improve the precision of its ephemeris and the epoch, we observed additional transits with the TRAPPIST and Euler telescopes. Using HARPS spectra obtained during the transit, we then determine the projected angle between the spin of the star and the orbit of the planet. We find that the host star of CoRoT-19b is an inactive F9V-type star close to the end of its main-sequence life. The host star has a mass M*=1.21+/-0.05 Msun and radius R*=1.65+/-0.04 Rsun. The planet has a mass of Mp=1.11+/-0.06 Mjup and radius of Rp=1.29+/-0.03 Rjup. The resulting bulk density is only rho=0.71+/-0.06 gcm-3, which is much lower than that for Jupiter. The exoplanet CoRoT-19b is an example of a giant planet of almost the same mass as Jupiter but a 30% larger radius. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT LRa01 field
Carone, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Cabrera, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose lightcurves have transit-like features. An extensive analytical and observational follow-up effort is undertaken to classify these candidates. Aims: The list of planetary transit candidates from the CoRoT LRa01 star field in the Monoceros constellation towards the Galactic anti-center is presented. The CoRoT observations of LRa01 lasted from 24 October 2007 to 3 March 2008. Methods: 7470 chromatic and 3938 monochromatic lightcurves were acquired and analysed. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were treated with several filtering tools by different teams from the CoRoT community. Different transit search algorithms were applied to the lightcurves. Results: Fifty-one stars were classified as planetary transit candidates in LRa01. Thirty-seven (i.e., 73 % of all candidates) are "good" planetary candidates based on photometric analysis only. Thirty-two (i.e., 87 % of the "good" candidates) have been followed-up. At the time of this writing twenty-two cases have been solved and five planets have been discovered: three transiting hot-Jupiters (CoRoT-5b, CoRoT-12b, and CoRoT-21b), the first terrestrial transiting planet (CoRoT-7b), and another planet in the same system (CoRoT-7c, detected by radial velocity survey only). Evidences of another non-transiting planet in the CoRoT-7 system, namely CoRoT-7d, have been recently found. [less ▲]

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See detailXX. CoRoT-20b: A very high density, high eccentricity transiting giant planet
Deleuil, M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Ferraz-Mello, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 +/- 0.23 MJ and a radius of 0.84 +/- 0.04 RJ. With a mean density of 8.87 +/- 1.10 g/cm^3 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 +/- 0.23 MJ and a radius of 0.84 +/- 0.04 RJ. With a mean density of 8.87 +/- 1.10 g/cm^3, it is among the most compact planets known so far. Evolution models for the planet suggest a mass of heavy elements of the order of 800 ME if embedded in a central core, requiring a revision either of the planet formation models or of planet evolution and structure models. We note however that smaller amounts of heavy elements are expected from more realistic models in which they are mixed throughout the envelope. The planet orbits a G-type star with an orbital period of 9.24 days and an eccentricity of 0.56. The star's projected rotational velocity is vsini = 4.5 +/- 1.0 km/s, corresponding to a spin period of 11.5 +/- 3.1 days if its axis of rotation is perpendicular to the orbital plane. In the framework of Darwinian theories and neglecting stellar magnetic breaking, we calculate the tidal evolution of the system and show that CoRoT-20b is presently one of the very few Darwin-stable planets that is evolving towards a triple synchronous state with equality of the orbital, planetary and stellar spin periods. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXII. CoRoT-16b: a hot Jupiter with a hint of eccentricity around a faint solar-like star
Ollivier, M; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Santerne, A et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 541

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-16b, a low density hot jupiter that orbits a faint G5V star (mV = 15.63) in 5.3523 ± 0.0002 days with slight eccentricity. A fit of the data with no a priori ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-16b, a low density hot jupiter that orbits a faint G5V star (mV = 15.63) in 5.3523 ± 0.0002 days with slight eccentricity. A fit of the data with no a priori assumptions on the orbit leads to an eccentricity of 0.33 ± 0.1. We discuss this value and also derive the mass and radius of the planet. <BR /> Methods: We analyse the photometric transit curve of CoRoT-16 given by the CoRoT satellite, and radial velocity data from the HARPS and HIRES spectrometers. A combined analysis using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to get the system parameters. <BR /> Results: CoRoT-16b is a 0.535 -0.083/+0.085 M[SUB]J[/SUB], 1.17 -0.14/+0.16 R[SUB]J[/SUB] hot Jupiter with a density of 0.44 -0.14/+0.21 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. Despite its short orbital distance (0.0618 ± 0.0015 AU) and the age of the parent star (6.73 ± 2.8 Gyr), the planet orbit exhibits significantly non-zero eccentricity. This is very uncommon for this type of objects as tidal effects tend to circularise the orbit. This value is discussed taking into account the characteristics of the star and the observation accuracy. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.Observations made with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (HARPS programs 083.C-0186 and 184.C-0639) and the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Observatory (NASA-Keck programs N035Hr, N143Hr and N095Hr). [less ▲]

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See detailCoRoT LRa02_E2_0121: Neptune-size planet candidate turns into a hierarchical triple system with a giant primary
Tal-Or, L.; Santerne, A.; Mazeh, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 534

This paper presents the case of CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121, which was initially classified as a Neptune-size transiting-planet candidate on a relatively wide orbit of 36.3 days. Follow-up observations were ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the case of CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121, which was initially classified as a Neptune-size transiting-planet candidate on a relatively wide orbit of 36.3 days. Follow-up observations were performed with UVES, Sandiford, SOPHIE, and HARPS. These observations revealed a faint companion in the spectra. To find the true nature of the system we derived the radial velocities of the faint companion using TODMOR - a two-dimensional correlation technique, applied to the SOPHIE spectra. Modeling the lightcurve with EBAS we discovered a secondary eclipse with a depth of ~0.07%, indicating a diluted eclipsing binary. Combined MCMC modeling of the lightcurve and the radial velocities suggested that CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121 is a hierarchical triple system with an evolved G-type primary and an A-type:F-type grazing eclipsing binary. Such triple systems are difficult to discover. Based on observations made with the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 184.C-0639), the VLT at Paranal Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 083.C-0690), and the 2.1-m Otto Struve telescope at McDonald Observatory, Texas, USA. [less ▲]

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