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See detailHematopoietic cell transplantation after reduced-intensity conditioning for older adults with acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storb, R.

in Current Opinion in Hematology (2007), 14(2), 145-151

Purpose of review Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning is a well established therapy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Its efficacy depends, in part, on ... [more ▼]

Purpose of review Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning is a well established therapy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Its efficacy depends, in part, on the destruction of recipient acute myeloid leukemia cells by the conditioning regimen and, in part on their removal by donor immune cells contained in the graft (graft-versus-tumor effect). Due to regiment related toxicities, the use of myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation has been restricted to younger patients in good condition. More recently, the introduction of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation following reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens, which rely mainly on graft-versus-tumor effects for tumor cell eradication, has permitted extending hematopoietic cell transplantation to include older patients and those with medical comorbidities. Recent findings Early results with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission are encouraging, with 2-year survivals after hematopoietic cell transplantation ranging from 48 to 79% among studies. Further, retrospective studies have demonstrated similar outcomes in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission given either myeloablative or nonmyeloablative conditioning. Summary Prospective studies are needed to define the place of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission, and to determine a role for consolidation chemotherapy before hematopoietic cell transplantation, if any. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors associated with outcomes in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning after failed myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storb, R.; Storer, B. E. et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2006), 24(25), 4150-4157

Purpose Several studies have investigated the feasibility of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) after reduced-intensity conditioning in patients who experienced relapse after ... [more ▼]

Purpose Several studies have investigated the feasibility of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) after reduced-intensity conditioning in patients who experienced relapse after myeloablative HCT. Although most studies showed relatively low nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rates and encouraging short-term results, it has yet to be defined which patients would benefit most from these approaches. Patients and Methods We analyzed data from 147 patients with hematologic malignancies who experienced treatment failure with conventional autologous (n = 135), allogeneic (n = 10), or syngeneic (n = 2) HCT and were treated with HLA-matched related (n = 62) or unrelated (n = 85) grafts after conditioning with 2 Gy of total-body irradiation with or without fludarabine. Results Three-year probabilities of NRM, relapse, and overall survival were 32%, 48%, and 27%, respectively, for related recipients, and 28%, 44%, and 44%, respectively, for unrelated recipients. The best outcomes were observed in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, whereas patients with multiple myeloma and Hodgkin's disease had worse outcomes as a result of high incidences of relapse and progression. Being in partial remission (PR) or complete remission (CR) at HCT (P = .002) and developing chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD; P = .03) resulted in lower risks of relapse and progression. Factors associated with better overall survival were PR or CR (P = .01) and lack of comorbidity (P = .03) at HCT and absence of acute GVHD after HCT (P = .06). Conclusion Encouraging outcomes were seen with allogeneic HCT after nonmyeloablative conditioning in selected patients who had experienced relapse after a high-dose HCT, particularly in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Results with unrelated grafts were comparable with results with related grafts. [less ▲]

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See detailFailure of donor lymphocyte infusion to prevent graft rejection in dogs given DLA-identical marrow after I Gy of total body irradiation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Sandmaier, B. M.; Zellmer, E. et al

in Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (2006), 12(8), 813-817

We investigated in a preclinical canine model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) whether preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) given 1 month after HCT could prevent late graft rejection that ... [more ▼]

We investigated in a preclinical canine model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) whether preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) given 1 month after HCT could prevent late graft rejection that was the rule in historical dogs given suboptimal conditioning with 1 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) before and immunosuppression with cyclosporine (CSP) and either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF; n = 6) or rapamycin (n = 5) after dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-identical marrow transplantation. Nine dogs given DLA-identical marrow after I Gy of TBI followed by postgrafting MMF and CSP were studied. A single DLI was given 28-36 days after HCT, either with (n = 5) or without (n = 4) preceding treatment with the immunosuppressive drug pentostatin. Two of the 4 dogs given DLI only maintained stable mixed donor-host chimera beyond 30 weeks after HCT, whereas 2 rejected their grafts, on weeks 10 and 15 after HCT. One of the 5 dogs given pentostatin before DLI maintained a stable mixed donor-host chimera beyond 30 weeks, whereas 4 rejected their grafts, at weeks 8, 12, 12, and 16 after HCT. The 30-week probability of stable mixed chimerism, was 33% among dogs given DLI, versus 0% among 11 historical dogs (P = .003). In conclusion, DLI was only moderately effective in preventing graft rejection in this model. Additional immunosuppression with pentostatin did not improve that outcome. The model might be useful in developing potential strategies aimed at preventing graft rejection in patients with low donor chimerism, levels. (C) 2006 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailAllogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation following nonmyeloablative conditioning as treatment for hematologic malignancies and inherited blood disorders
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storb, R.

in Molecular therapy (2006), 13(1), 26-41

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after myeloablative conditioning regimens has been an effective treatment for many patients with hematologic malignancies or inherited blood disorders ... [more ▼]

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after myeloablative conditioning regimens has been an effective treatment for many patients with hematologic malignancies or inherited blood disorders. Unfortunately, such regimens have been associated with significant toxicity, limiting their use to otherwise healthy, relatively young patients. In an attempt to extend treatment by allogeneic HCT to older patients and those with comorbid conditions, several groups of investigators have developed reduced-intensity or truly nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens, lacking such toxicity. Analogous to conventional regimens, reduced-intensity regimens both eliminated host-versus-graft (rejection) reactions and produced major anti-tumor effects. In contrast, nonmyeloablative regimens have relied on optimizing both pre-and posttransplant immunosuppression to overcome host-versus-g raft reactions, while anti-tumor responses have depended mainly on immune-mediated graft-versus-tumor effects. In this review, we define reduced-intensity and truly nonmyeloablative regimens, describe the preclinical development and clinical application of a very low intensity nonmyeloablative regimen, and review results with reduced-intensity regimens in patients with hematologic malignancies or inherited blood disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh doses of transplanted CD34(+) cells are associated with rapid T-cell engraftment and lessened risk of graft rejection, but not more graft-versus-host disease after nonmyeloablative conditioning and unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Maris, M. B.; Storer, B. E. et al

in Leukemia (2005), 19(5), 822-828

This report examines the impact of graft composition on outcomes in 130 patients with hematological malignancies given unrelated donor granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor-mobilized peripheral blood ... [more ▼]

This report examines the impact of graft composition on outcomes in 130 patients with hematological malignancies given unrelated donor granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (G-PBMC) ( n = 116) or marrow ( n = 14) transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning with 90 mg/m(2) fludarabine and 2Gy TBI. The median number of CD34(+) cells transplanted was 6.5 x 10(6)/ kg. Higher numbers of grafted CD14(+) ( P = 0.0008), CD3(+) ( P = 0.0007), CD4(+) ( P = 0.001), CD8(+) ( P = 0.004), CD3 - CD56(+) ( P = 0.003), and CD34(+) ( P = 0.0001) cells were associated with higher levels of day 28 donor T-cell chimerism. Higher numbers of CD14(+) ( P = 0.01) and CD34(+) ( P = 0.0003) cells were associated with rapid achievement of complete donor T-cell chimerism, while high numbers of CD8(+) ( P = 0.005) and CD34(+) ( P = 0.01) cells were associated with low probabilities of graft rejection. When analyses were restricted to G-PBMC recipients, higher numbers of grafted CD34(+) cells were associated with higher levels of day 28 donor T-cell chimerism ( P = 0.01), rapid achievement of complete donor T-cell chimerism ( P = 0.02), and a trend for lower risk for graft rejection ( P = 0.14). There were no associations between any cell subsets and acute or chronic GVHD nor relapse/progression. These data suggest more rapid engraftment of donor T cells and reduced rejection rates could be achieved by increasing the doses of CD34(+) cells in unrelated grafts administered after nonmyeloablative conditioning. [less ▲]

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See detailHLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Maris, M. B.; Storer, B. E. et al

in Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (2005), 11(4), 272-279

We evaluated 10/10 HLA antigen-matched unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning with fludarabine 3 x 30 mg/m(2) and 2 Gy of total body irradiation as ... [more ▼]

We evaluated 10/10 HLA antigen-matched unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning with fludarabine 3 x 30 mg/m(2) and 2 Gy of total body irradiation as treatment for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia who were ineligible for conventional HCT. Data from 21 consecutive patients in first chronic phase (CP1; n = 12), accelerated phase (AP; n = 5), second CP (CP2; n = 3), and blast crisis (n = 1) were analyzed. Stem cell sources were bone marrow (n = 4) or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (G-PBMCs; n = 17). The patient who underwent transplantation in blast crisis died on day 21 (too early to be evaluated. for engraftment) from progressive disease. Sustained engraftment was achieved in 5 of 12 patients who underwent transplantation in CP1, 4 of 5 patients who underwent transplantation in AP, and 2 of 3 patients who underwent transplantation in CP2, whereas 9 patients rejected their grafts between 28 and 400 days after HCT. Specifically, I of 4 marrow recipients and 10 of 17 G-PBMC recipients achieved sustained engraftment. Graft rejections were nonfatal in all cases and were followed by autologous reconstitution with persistence or recurrence of chronic myeloid leukemia. Seven of 11 patients with sustained engraftment-including all 5 patients in CP 1, 2 of 4 patients in AP, and neither of the 2 patients in CP2-were alive in complete cytogenetic remissions 118 to 1205 days (median, 867 days) after HCT. Two of the remaining 4 patients died of nonrelapse causes in complete (n = 1) or major (n = 1) cytogenetic remissions, and 2 died of progressive disease. Further efforts are directed at reducing the risk of graft rejection by exclusive use of G-PBMC and increasing the degree of pretransplantation immunosuppression. (c) 2005 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailGraft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Maris, M. B.; Sandmaier, B. M. et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2005), 23(9), 1993-2003

Purpose We have used a nonmyelorablative conditioning regimen consisting of total-body irradiation (2 Gy) with or without fludarabine (30 mg/m(2)/d for 3 days) for related and unrelated hematopoietic cell ... [more ▼]

Purpose We have used a nonmyelorablative conditioning regimen consisting of total-body irradiation (2 Gy) with or without fludarabine (30 mg/m(2)/d for 3 days) for related and unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with hematologic malignancies who were not candidates for conventional HCT because of age, medical comorbidities, or preceding high-dose HCT. This approach relied on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects for control of malignancy. Patients and Methods We analyzed GVT effects in 322 patients given grafts from HILA-matched related (n = 192) or unrelated donors (n = 130). Results Of the 221 patients with measurable disease at HCT, 126 (57%) achieved complete (n = 98) or partial (n = 28) remissions. In multivariate analysis, there was a higher probability trend of achieving complete remissions in patients with chronic extensive graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, P = .07). One hundred eight patients (34%) relapsed or progressed. In multivariate analysis, achievement of full donor chimerism was associated with a decreased risk of relapse or progression (P = .002). Grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD had no significant impact on the risk of relapse or progression but was associated with increased risk of nonrelapse mortality and decreased probability of progression-free survival (PFS). Conversely, extensive chronic GVHD was associated with decreased risk of relapse or progression (P = .006) and increased probability of PFS (P = .003). Conclusion New approaches aimed at reducing the incidence of grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD might improve survival after allogeneic HCT after nonmyeloablative conditioning. (c) 2005 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing donor chimerism level among CD3 T, CD4 T, CD8 T, and NK cells predicts subsequent graft rejection, GVHD, and relapse after allogeneic HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storb, R.; Gooley, T. et al

in Biology of Blood & Marrow Transplantation (2005), 11(2), 11

We previously showed that low levels of day-14 CD3 T and NK (CD56) cells donor chimerism predicted graft rejection, whereas high levels of day-28 CD3 T-cell donor chimerism predicted acute graft-versus ... [more ▼]

We previously showed that low levels of day-14 CD3 T and NK (CD56) cells donor chimerism predicted graft rejection, whereas high levels of day-28 CD3 T-cell donor chimerism predicted acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning. Here we investigate whether assessing chimerism levels among CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells, and also the absolute number of lymphocyte subsets of donor and host origins, would lend greater precision to our initial observations. We analyzed data from 157 patients receiving HCT after conditioning with 2 Gy TBI +/− fludarabine as treatment for AML (n= 22), ALL (n= 4), CML (n= 13), CLL (n= 19), MDS (n= 26), MM (n= 24), NHL (n= 30), HD (n= 14), RCC (n= 4), and WASP deficiency (n= 1). Postgrafting immunosuppression included MMF and CSP. A total of 97 patients received grafts from HLA-identical siblings, and 60 patients received grafts from HLA-matched unrelated donors. Lymphocyte subsets were isolated from peripheral blood by flow cytometry on days 14, 28, and 42. The proportion of cells of donor origin (chimerism levels) were assessed by VNTR-PCR and quantified by phosphor imaging. Eighteen patients (11%) had graft rejection. Day-14 donor chimerism levels< 50% among CD3 T (P =.0007), CD4 T (P =.03), and NK cells (P =.003) but not CD8 T cells predicted graft rejection. High absolute numbers of CD3 T (P =.002) and NK cells (P= .002) of host origin on day 14 were each associated with increased risks of graft rejection when treated as continuous linear variables. Grades 2, 3, and 4 acute GVHD were seen in 40%, 9%, and 5% of patients, respectively. High donor chimerism levels on day 14 among CD3 T (P= .02), CD4 T (P =.03), and CD8 T cells (P =.02) but not NK cells were each associated with increased risks of grades 2–4 acute GVHD. High absolute numbers of CD4 T (P =.04) and CD8 T cells (P =.04) of donor origin on days 14–42 were each associated with increased risks of grade 2–4 acute GVHD when treated as continuous linear variables, whereas high donor CD3 T (P= .002), CD8 T (P= .006), and NK cell (P= .002) chimerism levels from days 14–42 were associated with decreased risks of relapse. No statistically significant correlations between absolute numbers of donor cells and risks of relapse were found. These data suggest that assessing CD3, CD4, CD8, and NK cell donor chimerism levels and determining absolute numbers of CD3 and NK cells of host and donor origins are useful for predicting HCT outcomes after nonmyeloablative conditioning. [less ▲]

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