References of "Sterpenich, Virginie"
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See detailNeural correlates of generation and inhibition of verbal association patterns in mood disorders.
Piguet, Camille; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Cojan, Yann et al

in Social cognitive and affective neuroscience (2015), 10(7), 978-86

OBJECTIVES: Thought disorders such as rumination or flight of ideas are frequent in patients with mood disorders, and not systematically linked to mood state. These symptoms point to anomalies in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Thought disorders such as rumination or flight of ideas are frequent in patients with mood disorders, and not systematically linked to mood state. These symptoms point to anomalies in cognitive processes mediating the generation and control of thoughts; for example, associative thinking and inhibition. However, their neural substrates are not known. METHOD: To obtain an ecological measure of neural processes underlying the generation and suppression of spontaneous thoughts, we designed a free word association task during fMRI allowing us to explore verbal associative patterns in patients with mood disorders and matched controls. Participants were presented with emotionally negative, positive or neutral words, and asked to produce two words either related or unrelated to these stimuli. RESULTS: Relative to controls, patients produced a reverse pattern of answer typicality for the related vs unrelated conditions. Controls activated larger semantic and executive control networks, as well as basal ganglia, precuneus and middle frontal gyrus. Unlike controls, patients activated fusiform gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and medial prefrontal cortex for emotional stimuli. CONCLUSIONS: Mood disorder patients are impaired in automated associative processes, but prone to produce more unique/personal associations through activation of memory and self-related areas. [less ▲]

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See detailAbility to Maintain Internal Arousal and Motivation Modulates Brain Responses to Emotions
Sterpenich, Virginie; Schwartz, Sophie; MAQUET, Pierre ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2014)

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See detailNeural substrates of rumination tendency in non-depressed individuals.
Piguet, Camille; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in Biological psychology (2014), 103

The tendency to ruminate, experienced by both healthy individuals and depressed patients, can be quantified by the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS). We hypothesized that brain activity associated with ... [more ▼]

The tendency to ruminate, experienced by both healthy individuals and depressed patients, can be quantified by the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS). We hypothesized that brain activity associated with rumination tendency might not only occur at rest but also persist to some degree during a cognitive task. We correlated RRS with whole-brain fMRI data of 20 healthy subjects during rest and during a face categorization task with different levels of cognitive demands (easy or difficult conditions). Our results reveal that the more subjects tend to ruminate, the more they activate the left entorhinal region, both at rest and during the easy task condition, under low attentional demands. Conversely, lower tendency to ruminate correlates with greater activation of visual cortex during rest and activation of insula during the easy task condition. These results indicate a particular neural marker of the tendency to ruminate, corresponding to increased spontaneous activity in memory-related areas, presumably reflecting more internally driven trains of thoughts even during a concomitant task. Conversely, people who are not prone to ruminate show more externally driven activity. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep sharpens sensory stimulus coding in human visual cortex after fear conditioning.
Sterpenich, Virginie; Piguet, Camille; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2014), 100

Efficient perceptual identification of emotionally-relevant stimuli requires optimized neural coding. Because sleep contributes to neural plasticity mechanisms, we asked whether the perceptual ... [more ▼]

Efficient perceptual identification of emotionally-relevant stimuli requires optimized neural coding. Because sleep contributes to neural plasticity mechanisms, we asked whether the perceptual representation of emotionally-relevant stimuli within sensory cortices is modified after a period of sleep. We show combined effects of sleep and aversive conditioning on subsequent discrimination of face identity information, with parallel plasticity in the amygdala and visual cortex. After one night of sleep (but neither immediately nor after an equal waking interval), a fear-conditioned face was better detected when morphed with another identity. This behavioral change was accompanied by increased selectivity of the amygdala and face-responsive fusiform regions. Overnight neural changes can thus sharpen the representation of threat-related stimuli in cortical sensory areas, in order to improve detection in impoverished or ambiguous situations. These findings reveal an important role of sleep in shaping cortical selectivity to emotionally-relevant cues and thus promoting adaptive responses to new dangers. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory reactivation during rapid eye movement sleep promotes its generalization and integration in cortical stores.
Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Albouy, Genevieve et al

in Sleep (2014), 37(6), 1061-751075-1075

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. In this study we tested the influence of memory reactivation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on ... [more ▼]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. In this study we tested the influence of memory reactivation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-six healthy subjects (28 women and 28 men, age [mean +/- standard deviation]: 21.6 +/- 2.2 y) participated in this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. METHODS AND RESULTS: Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information. [less ▲]

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See detailA nap to recap: Reward strengthens relational memory during daytime sleep
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Igloi, Kinga; Eryilmaz, Hamdi et al

Conference (2013, September)

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See detailA nap to recap: Reward strengthens relational memory during daytime sleep
Igloi, Kinga; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Eryilmaz, Hamdi et al

Poster (2013, June)

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See detailA nap to recap: Reward strengthens relational memory during daytime sleep
Igloi, Kinga; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Eryilmaz, Hamdi et al

in Abstract book of the SSSSC annual meeting (2013, May)

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See detailA nap to recap: Reward strengthens relational memory during daytime sleep
Igloi, Kinga; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Eryilmaz, Hamdi et al

in Abstract book of BBL/CIBM Research Day (2013, May)

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See detailA nap to recap: Reward strengthens relational memory during daytime sleep
Igloi, Kinga; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Eryilmaz, Hamdi et al

in Abstract book of the NCCR Annual Research Forum (2013, February)

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See detailA nap to recap: Reward strengthens relational memory during daytime sleep
Igloi, Kinga; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Eryilmaz, Hamdi et al

in Abstract book of the ABIM meeting (2013, January)

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See detailNeural substrates of cognitive switching and inhibition in a face processing task.
Piguet, Camille; Sterpenich, Virginie; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2013), 82

We frequently need to change our current occupation, an operation requiring additional effortful cognitive demands. Switching from one task to another may involve two distinct processes: inhibition of the ... [more ▼]

We frequently need to change our current occupation, an operation requiring additional effortful cognitive demands. Switching from one task to another may involve two distinct processes: inhibition of the previously relevant task-set, and initiation of a new one. Here we tested whether these two processes are underpinned by separate neural substrates, and whether they differ depending on the nature of the task and the emotional content of stimuli. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy human volunteers who categorize emotional faces according to three different judgment rules (color, gender, or emotional expression). Our paradigm allowed us to separate neural activity associated with inhibition and switching based on the sequence of the tasks required on successive trials. We found that the bilateral medial superior parietal lobule and left intraparietal sulcus showed consistent activation during switching regardless of the task. On the other hand, no common region was activated (or suppressed) as a consequence of inhibition across all tasks. Rather, task-specific effects were observed in brain regions that were more activated when switching to a particular task but less activated after inhibition of the same task. In addition, compared to other conditions, the emotional task elicited a similar switching cost but lower inhibition cost, accompanied by selective decrease in the anterior cingulate cortex when returning to this task shortly after inhibiting it. These results demonstrate that switching relies on domain-general processes mediated by postero-medial parietal areas, engaged across all tasks, but also provide novel evidence that task inhibition produces domain-specific decreases as a function of particular task demands, with only the latter inhibition component being modulated by emotional information. [less ▲]

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See detailInteraction between hippocampal and striatal systems predicts subsequent consolidation of motor sequence memory.
Albouy, Geneviève; Sterpenich, Virginie; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(3), 59490

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See detailSleep stabilizes visuomotor adaptation memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2013), 22(2), 144-54

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See detailThe role of reward in sleep-related memory consolidation
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Igloi, Kinga; Eryilmaz, Hamdi et al

Poster (2012, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (9 ULg)
See detailEmotion and sleep interact to enhance the perceptual discrimination of ambiguous faces. Abstract book of the conference
Sterpenich, Virginie; Piguet, Camille; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

Conference (2011, June)

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See detailNeuroimaging insight into the dreaming brains
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Soriento, Yolanda E. (Ed.) Melatonin, Sleep and Insomnia (2011)

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See detailNeural substrates of the tendency of individuals to ruminate. Abstract Book of the congress.
Piguet, Camille; Sterpenich, Virginie; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

Conference (2010, June 10)

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