References of "Steiner, T. J"
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See detailNew appendix criteria open for a broader concept of chronic migraine.
Olesen, J.; Bousser, M*-G; Diener, H*-C et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2006), 26(6), 742-6

After the introduction of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache as diagnostic entities in The International Classification of Headache Disorders, Second Edition, ICHD-2, it has been shown that ... [more ▼]

After the introduction of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache as diagnostic entities in The International Classification of Headache Disorders, Second Edition, ICHD-2, it has been shown that very few patients fit into the diagnostic criteria for chronic migraine (CM). The system of being able to use CM and the medication overuse headache (MOH) diagnosis only after discontinuation of overuse has proven highly unpractical and new data have suggested a much more liberal use of these diagnoses. The International Headache Classification Committee has, therefore, worked out the more inclusive criteria for CM and MOH presented in this paper. These criteria are included in the appendix of ICHD-2 and are meant primarily for further scientific evaluation but may be used already now for inclusion into drug trials, etc. It is now recommended that the MOH diagnosis should no longer request improvement after discontinuation of medication overuse but should be given to patients if they have a primary headache plus ongoing medication overuse. The latter is defined as previously, i.e. 10 days or more of intake of triptans, ergot alkaloids mixed analgesics or opioids and 15 days or more of analgesics/NSAIDs or the combined use of more than one substance. If these new criteria for CM and MOH prove useful in future testing, the plan is to include them in a future revised version of ICHD-2. [less ▲]

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See detailThe International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-II)--revision of criteria for 8.2 Medication-overuse headache.
Silberstein, S. D.; Olesen, J.; Bousser, M.-G. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2005), 25(6), 460-5

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See detailComparative efficacy of eletriptan and zolmitriptan in the acute treatment of migraine
Steiner, T. J.; Diener, H. C.; MacGregor, E. A. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2003), 23(10), 942-952

Eletriptan 40 mg and 80 mg have shown greater efficacy in acute migraine than oral sumtriptan 100 mg and naratriptan 2.5 mg. This study continues the systematic series of active comparator trials in the ... [more ▼]

Eletriptan 40 mg and 80 mg have shown greater efficacy in acute migraine than oral sumtriptan 100 mg and naratriptan 2.5 mg. This study continues the systematic series of active comparator trials in the eletriptan clinical development programme. In a multicentre double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-groups trial, 1587 outpatients with migraine by IHS criteria were randomised in a 3: 3: 3: 1 ratio to eletriptan 80 mg, eletriptan 40 mg, zolmitriptan 2.5 mg or placebo. Of these, 1312 treated a single migraine attack and recorded baseline and outcome data to be included in the intention-to-treat population. The primary analysis was between eletriptan 80 mg and zolmitriptan. For the primary efficacy end-point of 2-h headache response, rates were 74% on eletriptan 80 mg, 64% on eletriptan 40 mg, 60% on zolmitriptan (P < 0.0001 vs. eletriptan 80 mg) and 22% on placebo (P < 0.0001 vs. all active treatments). Eletriptan 80 mg was superior to zolmitriptan on all secondary end-points at 1, 2 and 24 h, in most cases with statistical significance. Eletriptan 40 mg had similar efficacy to zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in earlier end-points, and significantly (P < 0.05) lower recurrence rate and need for rescue medication over 24 h. All treatments were well tolerated; 30-42% of patients on active treatments and 40% on placebo reported all-causality adverse events that were mostly mild and transient. On patients' global ratings of treatment, both eletriptan doses scored significantly better than zolmitriptan. [less ▲]

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See detailMigraine and cluster headache--their management with sumatriptan: a critical review of the current clinical experience.
Wilkinson, M.; Pfaffenrath, V.; Schoenen, Jean ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (1995), 15(5), 337-57

Sumatriptan is a potent and selective agonist at the vascular 5HT1 receptor which mediates constriction of certain large cranial blood vessels and/or inhibits the release of vasoactive neuropeptides from ... [more ▼]

Sumatriptan is a potent and selective agonist at the vascular 5HT1 receptor which mediates constriction of certain large cranial blood vessels and/or inhibits the release of vasoactive neuropeptides from perivascular trigeminal axons in the dura mater following activation of the trigeminovascular system. The mode of action of this drug in migraine and cluster headache is discussed. On the basis of a detailed review of all published trials and available data from post-marketing studies, the efficacy, safety, tolerability and the place of oral and subcutaneous sumatriptan in the treatment of both conditions are assessed. A number of double-blind clinical trials have demonstrated that sumatriptan 100 mg administered orally is clearly superior to placebo in the acute treatment of migraine headache and achieves significantly greater response rates than ergotamine or aspirin. In other studies, 70 to 80% of patients receiving sumatriptan 6 mg sc experienced relief of migraine headaches by 1 or 2 h after administration, and patients consistently required less rescue medication for unresolved symptoms. Sumatriptan was also effective in relieving associated migraine symptoms like nausea and vomiting. Sumatriptan was equally effective regardless of migraine type or duration of migraine symptoms. Overall, approximately 40% of patients who initially responded to oral or subcutaneous sumatriptan experienced recurrence of their headache usually within 24 h, effectively treated by a further dose of this drug. In 75% of patients with cluster headache treated with sumatriptan 6 mg sc, relief was achieved within 15 min. Based on pooled study data, sumatriptan is generally well tolerated and most adverse events are transient. Adverse events following oral administration include nausea, vomiting, malaise, fatigue and dizziness. With the subcutaneous injection, injection site reactions occur in approximately 30%. Chest syumptoms are reported in 3 to 5% but have been associated with myocardial ischaemia only in rare isolated cases. The recommended dosage of sumatriptan at the onset of migraine symptoms is 100 mg orally or 6 mg subcutaneously. The recommended dosage for cluster headache is 6 mg sumatriptan sc. Sumatriptan must not be given together with vasoconstrictive substances, e.g., ergotamines, or with migraine prophylactics with similar properties, e.g., methysergide. Sumatriptan should not be given during the migraine aura. It is contraindicated in patients with ischaemic heart disease, previous myocardial infarction, Prinzmetal (variant) angina and uncontrolled hypertension. [less ▲]

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