References of "Stapelfeldt, Karl"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailMaking high-accuracy null depth measurements for the LBTI exozodi survey
Mennesson, Bertrand; Defrere, Denis ULg; Nowak, Matthias et al

in Malbet, F.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Tuthill, P. (Eds.) Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V (2016, August 04)

The characterization of exozodiacal light emission is both important for the understanding of planetary systems evolution and for the preparation of future space missions aiming to characterize low mass ... [more ▼]

The characterization of exozodiacal light emission is both important for the understanding of planetary systems evolution and for the preparation of future space missions aiming to characterize low mass planets in the habitable zone of nearby main sequence stars. The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) exozodi survey aims at providing a ten-fold improvement over current state of the art, measuring dust emission levels down to a typical accuracy of 12 zodis per star, for a representative ensemble of 30+ high priority targets. Such measurements promise to yield a final accuracy of about 2 zodis on the median exozodi level of the targets sample. Reaching a 1 σ measurement uncertainty of 12 zodis per star corresponds to measuring interferometric cancellation ("null") levels, i.e visibilities at the few 100 ppm uncertainty level. We discuss here the challenges posed by making such high accuracy mid-infrared visibility measurements from the ground and present the methodology we developed for achieving current best levels of 500 ppm or so. We also discuss current limitations and plans for enhanced exozodi observations over the next few years at LBTI. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDirect imaging of extra-solar planets in star forming regions. Lessons learned from a false positive around IM Lup.
Mawet, Dimitri; Absil, Olivier ULg; Riaud, Pierre et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 544

Context. Most planet imagers consist of ground-based adaptive optics coronagraphic cameras which are currently limited in contrast, sensitivity and astrometric precision, but advantageously observe in the ... [more ▼]

Context. Most planet imagers consist of ground-based adaptive optics coronagraphic cameras which are currently limited in contrast, sensitivity and astrometric precision, but advantageously observe in the near-infrared window (1 - 5 µm). Because of these practical limitations, our current observational aim at detecting and characterizing planets puts heavy constraints on target selection, observing strategies, data reduction, and follow-up. Most surveys so far have thus targeted very young systems (1 - 100Myr) to catch the putative remnant thermal radiation of giant planets, which peaks in the near-infrared. They also favor systems in the solar neighborhood (d < 80 pc), which eases angular resolution requirements but also ensures a good knowledge of the distance and proper motion, which are critical to secure the planet status, and enable any subsequent characterization. Aims. Because of their youth, it is very tempting to target the nearby star forming regions, which are typically twice as far as the bulk of objects usually combed for planets by direct imaging. Probing these very interesting reservoirs in practice sets additional constraints that we review in this paper by presenting the planet search that we initiated in 2008 around the disk-bearing T Tauri star IM Lup, which is part of the Lupus star forming region (140-190 pc). Methods. We show and discuss why age determination, the choice of evolutionary model for both the central star and the planet, precise knowledge of the host star proper motion, relative or absolute (between different instruments) astrometric accuracy (including plate scale calibration), and patience are the key ingredients for exoplanet searches around more distant young stars. Results. Unfortunately, most of the time, precision and perseverance are not paying off: we discovered a candidate companion around IM Lup in 2008, which we report here to be a false positive event. We nevertheless review in details the lessons learned from our endeavor, and additionally present the best detection limits ever calculated for IM Lup. We also accessorily report on the successful use of innovative data reduction techniques, such as the damped-LOCI and iterative roll subtraction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (7 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHST Far-Ultraviolet Imaging of Jupiter During the Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9
Clarke, John T; Prange, Renee; Ballester, Gilda E et al

in Science (1995), 267

Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended ... [more ▼]

Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet images of Jupiter during the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts show the impact regions darkening over the 2 to 3 hours after the impact, becoming darker and more extended than at longer wavelengths, which indicates that ultraviolet-absorbing gases or aerosols are more extended, more absorbing, and at higher altitudes than the absorbers of visible light. Transient auroral emissions were observed near the magnetic conjugate point of the K impact site just after that impact. The global auroral activity was fainter than average during the impacts, and a variable auroral emission feature was observed inside the southern auroral oval preceding the impacts of fragments Q1 and Q2. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (5 ULg)