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See detailIs the multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis, the most abundant natural enemy to aphids in agroecosystems?
Vandereycken, Axel ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg; Joie, Emilie ULg et al

in Journal of Insect Science [=JIS] (2013), 13(158), 1-14

The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), was introduced into Western Europe in the late 1990s. Since the late 2000s, this species has been commonly ... [more ▼]

The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), was introduced into Western Europe in the late 1990s. Since the late 2000s, this species has been commonly considered one of the most abundant aphid predators in most Western European coun- tries. In spite of the large amount of research on H. axyridis, information concerning its relative abundance in agroecosystems is lacking. This study aims to evaluate the abundance of H. axyridis within the aphidophage community in four crops situated in southern Belgium: wheat, Triticum aestivum L. (Poales: Poaceae), corn, Zea mays, potato, Solanum tuberosum (Solanales: Solanaceae), and broad bean Vicia faba (Fabales: Fabaceae). In order to assess the species diver- sity, the collected data were analyzed by considering (1) the species richness and (2) the evenness according to the Shannon diversity index. Eleven aphidophages were observed in every invento- ried agroecosystem, including five abundant species: three coccinellids, the seven-spotted ladybug, Coccinella septempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), the 14-spotted Ladybird, Propylea quatuordecimpunctata, and H. axyridis; one hoverfly, the marmalade hoverfly, Episyr- phus balteatus De Geer (Diptera: Syrphidae); and one lacewing, the common green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens sensu lato (= s.l.) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Harmonia axyridis has been observed to thrive, breed, and reproduce on the four studied crops. Harmonia axyridis is the most abundant predator of aphids in corn followed by C. septempunctata, which is the main aphid predator observed in the three other inventoried crops. In wheat and potato fields, H. axyridis occurs in low numbers compared to other aphidophage. These observations suggest that H. axyridis could be considered an invasive species of agrosystems, and that potato and wheat may intermittently act as refuges for other aphidophages vulnerable to intraguild predation by this invader. Harmonia axyridis is not the most abundant aphid predator in the main Belgian crops. [less ▲]

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See detailThe chemical ecology of Harmonia axyridis
Sloggett, John; Magro, Alexandra; Verheggen, François ULg et al

in Bulletin OILB/SROP = IOBC/WPRS Bulletin (2013), 94

In the recent SI of BioControl and resultant book from this working group (Roy et al., 2012), we contributed a review paper on the chemical ecology of the invasive aphidophagous ladybird Harmonia axyridis ... [more ▼]

In the recent SI of BioControl and resultant book from this working group (Roy et al., 2012), we contributed a review paper on the chemical ecology of the invasive aphidophagous ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Sloggett et al., 2011). This paper focused on both the pure and applied aspects of this subject, including sections on: (1) chemical defence; (2) foods, feeding and reproduction; (3) H. axyridis chemistry, humans and human activity, and (4) future research perspectives [less ▲]

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See detailAggregation behaviour of Harmonia axyridis
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg et al

in Bulletin OILB/SROP = IOBC/WPRS Bulletin (2013), 94

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), forms large aggregations inside dwellings to survive cold winters. The species’ migratory flight is well documented ... [more ▼]

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), forms large aggregations inside dwellings to survive cold winters. The species’ migratory flight is well documented. Harmonia axyridis preferentially moves towards prominent and visually contrasting elements (Obata, 1986; Nalepa et al., 2005). However, the mechanisms involved in the selection of aggregation sites are misunderstood. The work presented here was devoted to the study of chemicals used by H. axyridis during its aggregation process. During sampling of infested dwellings, non-volatile compounds were collected from aggregation sites. Gas chromatrography-mass spectometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the chemicals found on the substrate where the beetles aggregate were different from the ones collected around these aggregation sites. These two blends are made up of the same long-chain hydrocarbons, comprising saturated and unsaturated homologues, but they are quantitatively different, the blend collected directly on the overwintering sites containing a higher proportion of saturated compounds than the other one. Behavioural experiments, involving overwintering H. axyridis individuals, were then conducted in the laboratory to understand the roles of these chemicals in aggregation. Firstly, an aggregation assay using the blend collected inside overwintering sites showed a clear preference of ladybeetles for areas containing these compounds, highlighting the retention capacity of the blend on H. axyridis. On the other hand, a Y-shaped tube assay, using the chemical blend found around the sites, showed that those compounds are used by male and female congeners as cues, allowing individuals to orientate towards the side of the set-up containing the tested chemicals. These results suggest the use of two different area markings by H. axyridis during its aggregation: the first one to lead congeners towards aggregation sites, and the second to ensure the cohesion of the cluster. Additional investigations were conducted to study the influence of (1) the presence of congeners and (2) the shelters’ luminosity on the H. axyridis decision to settle and aggregate under shelters. A binary choice experiment conducted in the laboratory under non-wintering conditions showed that the multicoloured Asian ladybeetles present a permanent aggregative behaviour, as a result of the existence of social interactions. These experiments also highlighted the clear preference of H. axyridis for dark shelters. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of long-chain hydrocarbons in the aggregation behaviour of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Insect Physiology (2012)

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetles, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), form large aggregations inside dwellings to survive cold winters, causing annoyances to householders from their number and sometimes the ... [more ▼]

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetles, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), form large aggregations inside dwellings to survive cold winters, causing annoyances to householders from their number and sometimes the induction of allergic reactions. Migratory flight and macrosite choice of this species is well documented. H. axyridis shows a hypsotactic behaviour and a clear preference for contrasting visual elements. However, how the microsite is selected remains undocumented, although a better understanding of the implicated factors could lead to the development of new control methods for this pest. In this work, we have hypothesized that non-volatile compounds are involved in the microsite choice and the aggregation process of this beetle. Long chain hydrocarbons were identified inside aggregation sites, comprising saturated and unsaturated homologues. An aggregation bioassay was then conducted on overwintering individuals, highlighting the retention capacity of the previously cited compounds on the tested ladybeetles. Additional investigations have shown that H. axyridis males and females, originating from overwintering sites, deposit a similar blend of molecules while walking. A Y-shaped tube assay revealed that this blend is used by male and female congeners as cue, allowing individuals to orientate towards the treated side of the olfactometer. These results suggest the use of two different blends of long chain hydrocarbons by H. axyridis during its aggregative period, the first one to lead conspecifics towards aggregation sites (microsites) and the second to ensure the cohesion of the aggregation. These findings support the potential use of these blends, in association with volatiles, in the design of traps in order to control infestations of this species in dwellings. [less ▲]

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See detailThe chemical ecology of Harmonia axyridis
Sloggett, John; Magro, Alexandra; Verheggen, François ULg et al

in BioControl (2011), 56

We review the chemical ecology of the ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis from the perspective of its invasiveness and the deleterious effects it exerts in the regions it has colonised. We outline the ... [more ▼]

We review the chemical ecology of the ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis from the perspective of its invasiveness and the deleterious effects it exerts in the regions it has colonised. We outline the nature and quantification of its chemical defence, and discuss the protection this provides against natural enemies, particularly intraguild predators. We consider the role of infochemicals in location of prey, intraspecific communication and intraguild interactions. We also discuss the role of prey allelochemicals in relation to H. axyridis extreme dietary generalism. Harmonia axyridis poses a number of practical problems for human health and well-being, including “ladybug taint” wine contamination and problems resulting from large aggregations overwintering in buildings. We consider chemical insights into these issues and, in particular, how attractants and repellents might help manage H. axyridis populations through a push–pull strategy. We conclude by discussing future perspectives for research. [less ▲]

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See detailThe chemical ecology of Harmonia axyridis
Sloggett, John; Magro, Alexandra; Verheggen, François ULg et al

in Roy, Helen; Ware, Remy; Handley-Lawson, Lori (Eds.) et al Invasive arthropod predators and parasitoids: an ecological approach (2011)

We review the chemical ecology of the ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis from the perspective of its invasiveness and the deleterious effects it exerts in the regions it has colonised. We outline the ... [more ▼]

We review the chemical ecology of the ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis from the perspective of its invasiveness and the deleterious effects it exerts in the regions it has colonised. We outline the nature and quantification of its chemical defence, and discuss the protection this provides from natural enemies, particularly intraguild predators. We consider the role played by infochemicals in location of prey, intraspecific communication and intraguild interactions; we also discuss the role of prey allelochemicals in relation to H. axyridis extreme dietary generalism. Harmonia axyridis poses a number of practical problems for human health and well-being, including “lady beetle taint” wine contamination and problems consequent on large aggregations overwintering in buildings. We discuss chemical insights into these issues and, in particular, how attractants and repellents might help manage H. axyridis populations. We conclude by discussing future perspectives for research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (19 ULg)