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See detailA window on exoplanet dynamical histories: Rossiter-McLaughlin observations of WASP-13b and WASP-32b
Brothwell, R.D.; Watson, C.A.; Hébrard, G. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2014), 440(4), 3392-3401

We present Rossiter-McLaughlin observations of WASP-13b and WASP-32b and determine the sky-projected angle between the normal of the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation axis (lambda). WASP-13b and ... [more ▼]

We present Rossiter-McLaughlin observations of WASP-13b and WASP-32b and determine the sky-projected angle between the normal of the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation axis (lambda). WASP-13b and WASP-32b both have prograde orbits and are consistent with alignment with measured sky-projected angles of lambda =8°^{+13}_{-12} and lambda =-2°^{+17}_{-19}, respectively. Both WASP-13 and WASP-32 have Teff < 6250 K, and therefore, these systems support the general trend that aligned planetary systems are preferentially found orbiting cool host stars. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis was carried out on archival SuperWASP data for both systems. A statistically significant stellar rotation period detection (above 99.9 per cent confidence) was identified for the WASP-32 system with Prot = 11.6 ± 1.0 days. This rotation period is in agreement with the predicted stellar rotation period calculated from the stellar radius, R*, and vsin i if a stellar inclination of i* = 90° is assumed. With the determined rotation period, the true 3D angle between the stellar rotation axis and the planetary orbit, psi, was found to be psi = 11° ± 14°. We conclude with a discussion on the alignment of systems around cool host stars with Teff < 6150 K by calculating the tidal dissipation time-scale. We find that systems with short tidal dissipation time-scales are preferentially aligned and systems with long tidal dissipation time-scales have a broad range of obliquities. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-frequency A-type pulsators discovered using SuperWASP
Holdsworth, Daniel L.; Smalley, B.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2014)

We present the results of a survey using the WASP archive to search for high-frequency pulsations in F-, A- and B-type stars. Over 1.5 million targets have been searched for pulsations with amplitudes ... [more ▼]

We present the results of a survey using the WASP archive to search for high-frequency pulsations in F-, A- and B-type stars. Over 1.5 million targets have been searched for pulsations with amplitudes greater than 0.5 millimagnitude. We identify over 350 stars which pulsate with periods less than 30 min. Spectroscopic follow-up of selected targets has enabled us to confirm 10 new rapidly oscillating Ap stars, 13 pulsating Am stars and the fastest known δ Scuti star. We also observe stars which show pulsations in both the high-frequency domain and the low-frequency δ Scuti range. This work shows the power of the WASP photometric survey to find variable stars with amplitudes well below the nominal photometric precision per observation. [less ▲]

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See detailEclipsing Am binary systems in the SuperWASP survey
Smalley, B.; Southworth, J.; Pintado, O. I. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2014), 564

The results of a search for eclipsing Am star binaries using photometry from the SuperWASP survey are presented. The light curves of 1742 Am stars fainter than V = 8.0 were analysed for the presence of ... [more ▼]

The results of a search for eclipsing Am star binaries using photometry from the SuperWASP survey are presented. The light curves of 1742 Am stars fainter than V = 8.0 were analysed for the presence of eclipses. A total of 70 stars were found to exhibit eclipses, with 66 having sufficient observations to enable orbital periods to be determined and 28 of which are newly identified eclipsing systems. Also presented are spectroscopic orbits for 5 of the systems. The number of systems and the period distribution is found to be consistent with that identified in previous radial velocity surveys of "classical" Am stars. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery of WASP-65b and WASP-75b: Two Hot Jupiters Without Highly Inflated Radii
Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013)

We report the discovery of two transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-65b (Mpl = 1.55 ± 0.16 MJ; Rpl = 1.11 ± 0.06 RJ), and WASP-75b (Mpl = 1.07 ± 0.05 MJ; Rpl = 1.27 ± 0.05 RJ). They orbit their host star every ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of two transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-65b (Mpl = 1.55 ± 0.16 MJ; Rpl = 1.11 ± 0.06 RJ), and WASP-75b (Mpl = 1.07 ± 0.05 MJ; Rpl = 1.27 ± 0.05 RJ). They orbit their host star every ~2.311, and ~2.484 days, respectively. The planet host WASP-65 is a G6 star (Teff = 5600 K, [Fe/H] = -0.07 ± 0.07, age ≳8 Gyr); WASP-75 is an F9 star (Teff = 6100 K, [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.09, age ~ 3 Gyr). WASP-65b is one of the densest known exoplanets in the mass range 0.1 and 2.0 MJ (rhopl = 1.13 ± 0.08 rhoJ), a mass range where a large fraction of planets are found to be inflated with respect to theoretical planet models. WASP-65b is one of only a handful of planets with masses of ~1.5 MJ, a mass regime surprisingly underrepresented among the currently known hot Jupiters. The radius of WASP-75b is slightly inflated (≲10%) as compared to theoretical planet models with no core, and has a density similar to that of Saturn (rhopl = 0.52 ± 0.06 rhoJ). [less ▲]

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See detailThree sub-Jupiter-mass planets: WASP-69b & WASP-84b transit active K dwarfs and WASP-70Ab transits the evolved primary of a G4+K3 binary
Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, Laetitia ULg et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

We report the discovery of the transiting exoplanets WASP-69b, WASP-70Ab and WASP-84b, each of which orbits a bright star (V~10). WASP-69b is a bloated Saturn-mass planet (0.26 M$_{\rm Jup}$, 1.06 R$_{\rm ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of the transiting exoplanets WASP-69b, WASP-70Ab and WASP-84b, each of which orbits a bright star (V~10). WASP-69b is a bloated Saturn-mass planet (0.26 M$_{\rm Jup}$, 1.06 R$_{\rm Jup}$) in a 3.868-d period around an active mid-K dwarf. We estimate a stellar age of 1 Gyr from both gyrochronological and age-activity relations, though an alternative gyrochronological relation suggests an age of 3 Gyr. ROSAT detected X-rays at a distance of 60$\pm$27 arcsec from WASP-69. If the star is the source then the planet could be undergoing mass-loss at a rate of ~10$^{12}$ g s$^{-1}$. This is 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the evaporation rate estimated for HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which have exhibited anomalously-large Lyman-{\alpha} absorption during transit. WASP-70Ab is a sub-Jupiter-mass planet (0.59 M$_{\rm Jup}$, 1.16R$_{\rm Jup}$) in a 3.713-d orbit around the primary of a spatially-resolved G4+K3 binary, with a separation of 3.3 arcsec ($\geq$800 AU). We exploit the binary nature of the system to construct a H-R diagram, from which we estimate its age to be 9-10 Gyr. WASP-84b is a sub-Jupiter-mass planet (0.69 M$_{\rm Jup}$, 0.94 R$_{\rm Jup}$) in an 8.523-d orbit around an active early-K dwarf. Of the transiting planets discovered from the ground to date, WASP-84b has the third-longest period. From a combination of gyrochronological and age-activity relations we estimate the age of WASP-84 to be ~1 Gyr. For both the active stars WASP-69 and WASP-84 we find a modulation of the radial velocities with a period similar to the photometrically-determined stellar rotation period. We fit the residuals with a low-order harmonic series and subtract the best fit from the RVs prior to deriving the system parameters. In each case the solution is essentially unchanged, with much less than a 1-{\sigma} change to the planetary mass. We found... [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-54b, WASP-56b and WASP-57b: Three new sub-Jupiter mass planets from SuperWASP
Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence ... [more ▼]

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence, every 3.69 days. Our MCMC fit of the system yields a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.067+0.033-0.025) for WASP-54b. We investigated further the veracity of our detection of the eccentric orbit for WASP-54b, and we find that it could be real. However, given the brightness of WASP-54 V = 10.42 mag, we encourage observations of a secondary eclipse to draw robust conclusions on both the orbital eccentricity and the thermal structure of the planet. WASP-56b and WASP-57b have masses of 0.571+0.034-0.035MJ and 0.672+0.049-0.046MJ, respectively; and radii of 1.092+0.035-0.033RJ for WASP-56b and 0.916+0.017-0.014RJ for WASP-57b. They orbit main sequence stars of spectral type G6 every 4.67 and 2.84 days, respectively. WASP-56b and WASP-57b show no radius anomaly and a high density possibly implying a large core of heavy elements; possibly as high as ~50 M⊕ in the case of WASP-57b. However,the composition of the deep interior of exoplanets remains still undetermined. Thus, more exoplanet discoveries such as the ones presented in this paper, are needed to understand and constrain giant planets' physical properties. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-35b, WASP-48b and WASP-51b: Two new planets and an independent discovery of HAT-P-30b
Enoch, B.; Anderson, D. R.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2011), 142(3), 86

We report the detection of WASP-35b, a planet transiting a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.15) star in the Southern hemisphere, WASP-48b, an inflated planet which may have spun-up its slightly evolved host star ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of WASP-35b, a planet transiting a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.15) star in the Southern hemisphere, WASP-48b, an inflated planet which may have spun-up its slightly evolved host star of 1.75 R_sun in the Northern hemisphere, and the independent discovery of HAT-P-30b / WASP-51b, a new planet in the Northern hemisphere. Using WASP, RISE, FTS and TRAPPIST photometry, with CORALIE, SOPHIE and NOT spectroscopy, we determine that WASP-35b has a mass of 0.72 +/- 0.06 M_J and radius of 1.32 +/- 0.03 R_J, and orbits with a period of 3.16 days, WASP-48b has a mass of 0.98 +/- 0.09 M_J, radius of 1.67 +/- 0.08 R_J and orbits in 2.14 days, while WASP-51b, with an orbital period of 2.81 days, is found to have a mass of 0.76 +/- 0.05 M_J and radius of 1.42 +/- 0.04 R_J, agreeing with values of 0.71 +/- 0.03 M_J and 1.34 +/- 0.07 R_J reported for HAT-P-30b. [less ▲]

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See detailThe spin-orbit angles of the transiting exoplanets WASP-1b, WASP-24b, WASP-38b and HAT-P-8b from Rossiter-McLaughlin observations
Simpson, E. K.; Pollacco, D.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2011), 414

We present observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for the transiting exoplanet systems WASP-1, WASP-24, WASP-38 and HAT-P-8, and deduce the orientations of the planetary orbits with respect to the ... [more ▼]

We present observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for the transiting exoplanet systems WASP-1, WASP-24, WASP-38 and HAT-P-8, and deduce the orientations of the planetary orbits with respect to the host stars' rotation axes. The planets WASP-24b, WASP-38b and HAT-P-8b appear to move in prograde orbits and be well aligned, having sky-projected spin orbit angles consistent with zero: {\lambda} = -4.7 \pm 4.0{\deg}, {\lambda} = 15 + 33{\deg}/-43{\deg} and {\lambda} = -9.7 +9.0{\deg}/-7.7{\deg}, respectively. The host stars have Teff < 6250 K and conform with the trend of cooler stars having low obliquities. WASP-38b is a massive planet on a moderately long period, eccentric orbit so may be expected to have a misaligned orbit given the high obliquities measured in similar systems. However, we find no evidence for a large spin-orbit angle. By contrast, WASP-1b joins the growing number of misaligned systems and has an almost polar orbit, {\lambda} = -79 +4.5{\deg}/-4.3{\deg}. It is neither very massive, eccentric nor orbiting a hot host star, and therefore does not share the properties of many other misaligned systems. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-40b: Independent Discovery of the 0.6 M Transiting Exoplanet HAT-P-27b
Anderson, D. R.; Barros, S. C. C.; Boisse, I. et al

in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific [=PASP] (2011), 123

From WASP photometry and SOPHIE radial velocities we report the discovery of WASP-40b (HAT-P-27b), a 0.6 M planet that transits its 12th magnitude host star every 3.04 days. The host star is of late G ... [more ▼]

From WASP photometry and SOPHIE radial velocities we report the discovery of WASP-40b (HAT-P-27b), a 0.6 M planet that transits its 12th magnitude host star every 3.04 days. The host star is of late G-type or early K-type and likely has a metallicity greater than solar ([Fe/H]=0.14±0.11). The planet's mass and radius are typical of the known hot Jupiters, thus adding another system to the apparent pileup of transiting planets with periods near 3-4 days. Our parameters match those of the recent HATnet announcement of the same planet, thus giving confidence in the techniques used. We report a possible indication of stellar activity in the host star. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-32b: A transiting hot Jupiter planet orbiting a lithium-poor, solar-type star
Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific [=PASP] (2010), 122(898), 1465-1470

We report the discovery of a transiting planet orbiting the star TYC 2-1155-1. The star, WASP-32, is a moderately bright (V=11.3) solar-type star (Teff=6100 +- 100K, [Fe/H] = -0.13 +- 0.10). The ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a transiting planet orbiting the star TYC 2-1155-1. The star, WASP-32, is a moderately bright (V=11.3) solar-type star (Teff=6100 +- 100K, [Fe/H] = -0.13 +- 0.10). The lightcurve of the star obtained with the WASP-South and WASP-North instruments shows periodic transit-like features with a depth of about 1% and a duration of 0.10d every 2.72d. The presence of a transit-like feature in the lightcurve is confirmed using z-band photometry obtained with Faulkes Telescope North. High resolution spectroscopy obtained with the CORALIE spectrograph confirms the presence of a planetary mass companion. From a combined analysis of the spectroscopic and photometric data, assuming that the star is a typical main-sequence star, we estimate that the planet has a mass M_p = 3.60 +- 0.07 M_Jup and a radius R_p = 1.19 +- 0.06R_Jup. WASP-32 is one of a small group of hot Jupiters with masses M_p > 3M_Jup. We find that some stars with hot Jupiter companions and with masses M_* =~ 1.2M_sun, including WASP-32, are depleted in lithium, but that the majority of these stars have similar lithium abundances to field stars. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-24 b: A New Transiting Close-in Hot Jupiter Orbiting a Late F-star
Street, R. A.; Simpson, E.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 720

We report the discovery of a new transiting close-in giant planet, WASP-24 b, in a 2.341 day orbit, 0.037 AU from its F8-9 type host star. By matching the star's spectrum with theoretical models, we infer ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a new transiting close-in giant planet, WASP-24 b, in a 2.341 day orbit, 0.037 AU from its F8-9 type host star. By matching the star's spectrum with theoretical models, we infer an effective temperature T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6075 ± 100 K and a surface gravity of log g = 4.15 ± 0.10. A comparison of these parameters with theoretical isochrones and evolutionary mass tracks places only weak constraints on the age of the host star, which we estimate to be 3.8[SUP]+1.3[/SUP] [SUB]-1.2[/SUB] Gyr. The planetary nature of the companion was confirmed by radial velocity measurements and additional photometric observations. These data were fit simultaneously in order to determine the most probable parameter set for the system, from which we infer a planetary mass of 1.071[SUP]+0.036[/SUP] [SUB]-0.038[/SUB] M [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and radius 1.3[SUP]+0.039[/SUP] [SUB]-0.037[/SUB] R [SUB]Jup[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-19b: The Shortest Period Transiting Exoplanet Yet Discovered
Hebb, L.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Triaud, A H M J et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 708

We report on the discovery of a new extremely short period transiting extrasolar planet, WASP-19b. The planet has mass M [SUB]pl[/SUB] = 1.15 ± 0.08 M[SUB]J[/SUB] , radius R [SUB]pl[/SUB] = 1.31 ± 0.06 ... [more ▼]

We report on the discovery of a new extremely short period transiting extrasolar planet, WASP-19b. The planet has mass M [SUB]pl[/SUB] = 1.15 ± 0.08 M[SUB]J[/SUB] , radius R [SUB]pl[/SUB] = 1.31 ± 0.06 R[SUB]J[/SUB] , and orbital period P = 0.7888399 ± 0.0000008 days. Through spectroscopic analysis, we determine the host star to be a slightly super-solar metallicity ([M/H] = 0.1 ± 0.1 dex) G-dwarf with T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5500 ± 100 K. In addition, we detect periodic, sinusoidal flux variations in the light curve which are used to derive a rotation period for the star of P [SUB]rot[/SUB] = 10.5 ± 0.2 days. The relatively short stellar rotation period suggests that either WASP-19 is somewhat young (~ 600 Myr old) or tidal interactions between the two bodies have caused the planet to spiral inward over its lifetime resulting in the spin-up of the star. Due to the detection of the rotation period, this system has the potential to place strong constraints on the stellar tidal quality factor, Q'[SUB] s [/SUB], if a more precise age is determined. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-16b: A New Jupiter-Like Planet Transiting a Southern Solar Analog
Lister, T. A.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 703

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery from WASP-South of a new Jupiter-like extrasolar planet, WASP-16b, which transits its solar analog host star every 3.12 days. Analysis of the transit photometry and radial velocity spectroscopic data leads to a planet with R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.008 ± 0.071 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.855 ± 0.059 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], orbiting a host star with R [SUB]*[/SUB] = 0.946 ± 0.054 R [SUB]sun[/SUB] and M [SUB]*[/SUB] = 1.022 ± 0.101 M [SUB]sun[/SUB]. Comparison of the high resolution stellar spectrum with synthetic spectra and stellar evolution models indicates the host star is a near-solar metallicity ([Fe/H] =0.01 ± 0.10) solar analog (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5700 ± 150 K and log g = 4.5 ± 0.2) of intermediate age (tau = 2.3[SUP]+5.8[/SUP] [SUB]--2.2[/SUB] Gyr). [less ▲]

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See detailWasp-7: A Bright Transiting-Exoplanet System in the Southern Hemisphere
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 690

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest ... [more ▼]

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest transiting-exoplanet system in the southern hemisphere. WASP-7b is among the densest of the known Jupiter-mass planets, suggesting that it has a massive core. The planet mass is 0.96[SUP]+0.12[/SUP] [SUB]--0.18[/SUB] M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], the radius is 0.915[SUP]+0.046[/SUP] [SUB]--0.040[/SUB] R [SUB]Jup[/SUB], and the density is 1.26[SUP]+0.25[/SUP] [SUB]--0.21[/SUB] rho[SUB]Jup[/SUB] (1.67[SUP]+0.33[/SUP] [SUB]--0.28[/SUB] g cm[SUP]--3[/SUP]). [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-5b: a dense, very hot Jupiter transiting a 12th-mag Southern-hemisphere star
Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Hellier, C. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2008), 387

We report the discovery of WASP-5b, a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting a 12th-mag G-type star in the Southern hemisphere. The 1.6-d orbital period places WASP-5b in the class of very hot Jupiters and leads to ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-5b, a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting a 12th-mag G-type star in the Southern hemisphere. The 1.6-d orbital period places WASP-5b in the class of very hot Jupiters and leads to a predicted equilibrium temperature of 1750K. WASP-5b is the densest of any known Jovian-mass planet, being a factor of 7 denser than TrES-4, which is subject to similar stellar insolation, and a factor of 3 denser than WASP-4b, which has a similar orbital period. We present transit photometry and radial velocity measurements of WASP-5 (= USNO-B10487-0799749), from which we derive the mass, radius and density of the planet: M[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.58[SUP]+0.13[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB]M[SUB]J[/SUB],R[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.090[SUP]+0.094[/SUP][SUB]-0.058[/SUB]R[SUB]J[/SUB] and rho[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.22[SUP]+0.19[/SUP][SUB]-0.24[/SUB]rho[SUB]J[/SUB]. The orbital period is P = 1.6284296[SUP]+0.0000048[/SUP][SUB]-0.0000037[/SUB]d and the mid-transit epoch is T[SUB]C[/SUB](HJD) = 2454375.62466[SUP]+0.00026[/SUP][SUB]-0.00025[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-4b: A 12th Magnitude Transiting Hot Jupiter in the Southern Hemisphere
Wilson, D. M.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Hellier, C. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2008), 675

We report the discovery of WASP-4b, a large transiting gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.34 days. This is the first planet to be discovered by the SuperWASP-South observatory and CORALIE ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-4b, a large transiting gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.34 days. This is the first planet to be discovered by the SuperWASP-South observatory and CORALIE collaboration and the first planet orbiting a star brighter than 16th magnitude to be discovered in the southern hemisphere. A simultaneous fit to high-quality light curves and precision radial velocity measurements leads to a planetary mass of 1.22[SUP]+0.09[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB] M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a planetary radius of 1.42[SUP]+0.07[/SUP][SUB]-0.04[/SUB] R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. The host star is USNO-B1.0 0479-0948995, a G7 V star of visual magnitude 12.5. As a result of the short orbital period, the predicted surface temperature of the planet is 1761 K, making it an ideal candidate for detections of the secondary eclipse at infrared wavelengths. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-1b and WASP-2b: two new transiting exoplanets detected with SuperWASP and SOPHIE
Cameron, A Collier; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2007), 375

We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified ... [more ▼]

We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified as being likely host stars of transiting exoplanets in the 2004 SuperWASP wide-field transit survey. Using the newly commissioned radial-velocity spectrograph SOPHIE at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, we found that both objects exhibit reflex orbital radial-velocity variations with amplitudes characteristic of planetary-mass companions and in-phase with the photometric orbits. Line-bisector studies rule out faint blended binaries as the cause of either the radial-velocity variations or the transits. We perform preliminary spectral analyses of the host stars, which together with their radial-velocity variations and fits to the transit light curves yield estimates of the planetary masses and radii. WASP-1b and WASP-2b have orbital periods of 2.52 and 2.15 d, respectively. Given mass estimates for their F7V and K1V primaries, we derive planet masses 0.80-0.98 and 0.81-0.95 times that of Jupiter, respectively. WASP-1b appears to have an inflated radius of at least 1.33 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], whereas WASP-2b has a radius in the range 0.65-1.26 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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