References of "Simon, Patricia"
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See detailDiversité moléculaire des cyanobactéries planctonniques dans les eaux de surface belges
Lara, Yannick ULg; Lambion, Alexandre ULg; Simon, Patricia ULg et al

Poster (2008, April 02)

Les développements massifs de cyanobactéries ou ‘blooms’ sont devenus un phénomène récurrent et de plus en plus important dans les eaux douces du monde entier durant la dernière décennie. Ces ... [more ▼]

Les développements massifs de cyanobactéries ou ‘blooms’ sont devenus un phénomène récurrent et de plus en plus important dans les eaux douces du monde entier durant la dernière décennie. Ces efflorescences présentent des risques potentiels majeurs pour la santé humaine et animale et interfèrent négativement avec l'utilisation des eaux de surface par exemple, pour le captage d'eau potable, les loisirs nautiques, l'irrigation, les exploitations piscicoles. Entre 25 et 70% des blooms sont toxiques. Comme beaucoup de pays la Belgique n'a pas échappé au problème des efflorescences de cyanobactéries toxiques, mais il y a encore relativement peu de données. Durant la dernière décennie, trois projets européens et nationaux (MIDICHIP 1999-2003, B-BLOOMS 2003-2005, B-BLOOMS 2 2007-2011) se sont intéressés à la diversité des cyanobactéries dans les eaux de surfaces belges. Nous présentons ici un arbre phylogénétique élaboré à partir d’ un pool de 249 séquences partielles du gène codant pour l’ARNr 16S obtenu à partir de 31 échantillons d’eaux belges issus de ces projets. Cet arbre représente la mise à jour d’une base de données qui constitue l’inventaire des cyanobactéries d’eaux douces belges. Cette base de données permet le suivi de l’évolution de la diversité observable de ces organismes en Belgique et la surveillance de l’apparition d’espèces tropicales comme conséquence aux changements climatiques globaux. [less ▲]

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See detailHighly effective SNP-based association mapping and management of recessive defects in livestock.
Charlier, Carole ULg; Coppieters, Wouter ULg; Rollin, Frédéric ULg et al

in Nature Genetics (2008), 40(4), 449-54

The widespread use of elite sires by means of artificial insemination in livestock breeding leads to the frequent emergence of recessive genetic defects, which cause significant economic and animal ... [more ▼]

The widespread use of elite sires by means of artificial insemination in livestock breeding leads to the frequent emergence of recessive genetic defects, which cause significant economic and animal welfare concerns. Here we show that the availability of genome-wide, high-density SNP panels, combined with the typical structure of livestock populations, markedly accelerates the positional identification of genes and mutations that cause inherited defects. We report the fine-scale mapping of five recessive disorders in cattle and the molecular basis for three of these: congenital muscular dystony (CMD) types 1 and 2 in Belgian Blue cattle and ichthyosis fetalis in Italian Chianina cattle. Identification of these causative mutations has an immediate translation into breeding practice, allowing marker assisted selection against the defects through avoidance of at-risk matings. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular dissection of a quantitative trait locus: a phenylalanine-to-tyrosine substitution in the transmembrane domain of the bovine growth hormone receptor is associated with a major effect on milk yield and composition.
Blott, Sarah; Kim, Jong-Joo; Moisio, Sirja et al

in Genetics (2003), 163(1), 253-66

We herein report on our efforts to improve the mapping resolution of a QTL with major effect on milk yield and composition that was previously mapped to bovine chromosome 20. By using a denser chromosome ... [more ▼]

We herein report on our efforts to improve the mapping resolution of a QTL with major effect on milk yield and composition that was previously mapped to bovine chromosome 20. By using a denser chromosome 20 marker map and by exploiting linkage disequilibrium using two distinct approaches, we provide strong evidence that a chromosome segment including the gene coding for the growth hormone receptor accounts for at least part of the chromosome 20 QTL effect. By sequencing individuals with known QTL genotype, we identify an F to Y substitution in the transmembrane domain of the growth hormone receptor gene that is associated with a strong effect on milk yield and composition in the general population. [less ▲]

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See detailExtensive Genome-Wide Linkage Disequilibrium in Cattle
Farnir, Frédéric ULg; Coppieters, Wouter ULg; Arranz, J. J. et al

in Genome Research (2000), 10(2), 220-7

A genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) map was generated using microsatellite genotypes (284 autosomal microsatellite loci) of 581 gametes sampled from the dutch black-and-white dairy cattle population ... [more ▼]

A genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) map was generated using microsatellite genotypes (284 autosomal microsatellite loci) of 581 gametes sampled from the dutch black-and-white dairy cattle population. LD was measured between all marker pairs, both syntenic and nonsyntenic. Analysis of syntenic pairs revealed surprisingly high levels of LD that, although more pronounced for closely linked marker pairs, extended over several tens of centimorgan. In addition, significant gametic associations were also shown to be very common between nonsyntenic loci. Simulations using the known genealogies of the studied sample indicate that random drift alone is likely to account for most of the observed disequilibrium. No clear evidence was obtained for a direct effect of selection ("Bulmer effect"). The observation of long range disequilibrium between syntenic loci using low-density marker maps indicates that LD mapping has the potential to be very effective in livestock populations. The frequent occurrence of gametic associations between nonsyntenic loci, however, encourages the combined use of linkage and linkage disequilibrium methods to avoid false positive results when mapping genes in livestock. [less ▲]

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See detailHybridization of 2,659 Clostridium Perfringens Isolates with Gene Probes for Seven Toxins (Alpha, Beta, Epsilon, Iota, Theta, Mu, and Enterotoxin) and for Sialidase
Daube, Georges ULg; Simon, Patricia ULg; Limbourg, Bernard et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (1996), 57(4), 496-501

OBJECTIVE--To genetically characterize Clostridium perfringens isolates for association of pathologic type with various diseases. DESIGN--Prospective study. SAMPLE POPULATION--2,659 C perfringens isolates ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE--To genetically characterize Clostridium perfringens isolates for association of pathologic type with various diseases. DESIGN--Prospective study. SAMPLE POPULATION--2,659 C perfringens isolates from various nonhuman animals species, human beings, and foods. PROCEDURE--Colony hybridization with DNA probes for 7 toxin (alpha, beta, epsilon, iota (subunits a and b), theta, mu, and enterotoxin) genes and 1 sialidase gene were performed to group the isolates by pathologic type. RESULTS--Enterotoxin-negative type-A isolates were the most common (2,575/2,659), were isolated from all sources, and were separated into 5 pathologic types. In cattle and horses with enterotoxemia, essentially only these pathologic types were identified. The enterotoxin-negative isolates of types C or D each had a single pathologic type. Type-C isolates were isolated only from swine with necrotic enteritis and type-D isolates from small ruminants with enterotoxemia, except that 1 type-D isolate was also found from a healthy fish. Type-B or -E isolates were not found. Among the 47 enterotoxin-positive isolates, 5 isolates from sheep or deer were type D and the other 42 were type A. These 42 isolates were grouped into 3 pathologic types: 1 type was isolated from samples of almost all origins, but the other 2 types were found in only 5 fish, 4 human beings, and 1 dog. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE--Genetic characterization of these isolates allowed identification of 11 different pathologic types. This approach may be useful in molecular diagnosis and prophylaxis of clostridial disease. [less ▲]

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See detailTyping of Clostridium Perfringens by in Vitro Amplification of Toxin Genes
Daube, Georges ULg; China, Bernard; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Journal of Applied Bacteriology (1994), 77(6), 650-655

The strains of Clostridium perfringens are classified according to major toxins produced. Classically, this determination involves the seroneutralization of their lethal effect in mice. However, this ... [more ▼]

The strains of Clostridium perfringens are classified according to major toxins produced. Classically, this determination involves the seroneutralization of their lethal effect in mice. However, this method requires specific antisera and a large number of mice. In this work, a new typing method was developed based on the amplification of toxin genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By combination of several pairs of primers, the toxinotype of a Cl. perfringens strain was determined by looking at the pattern of bands on an agarose gel electrophoresis. This mixture contained primers amplifying simultaneously a part of alpha-toxin, beta-toxin, epsilon-toxin and enterotoxin genes. In order to distinguish between toxinotype A and E, the l-toxin gene fragment must be amplified in a separate PCR reaction. Moreover, with the primers combination, in most cases, a PCR product corresponding to the alpha-toxin gene was obtained from direct enrichments of animal intestinal contents. [less ▲]

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See detailIs1151, an Is-Like Element of Clostridium Perfringens
Daube, Georges ULg; Kaeckenbeeck, Albert ULg; Simon, Patricia ULg

in Nucleic Acids Research (1993), 21(2), 352

Description of a new insertion sequence, named IS1151, associated with cpe gene from Clostridium perfringens

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