References of "Silvestre, Aude"
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See detailYou’re not my dad, you’re my coach! When Paternalism Impairs Agility Performance
Silvestre, Aude ULg; Dardenne, Benoît ULg

Poster (2012, August 21)

Objectives: We were interested in the impacts of coach’s paternalistic motivational speech on young high performance sportsmen and sportswomen. We suggested that their motor performance (agility test ... [more ▼]

Objectives: We were interested in the impacts of coach’s paternalistic motivational speech on young high performance sportsmen and sportswomen. We suggested that their motor performance (agility test) would be diminished. Design: We used a 2 (paternalism: presence vs. absence) X 2 (valence: positive vs. negative) design to create four types of motivational speech. Methods: 60 participants read a description of an invented collective sport, followed by the coach’s motivational speech. After reading those texts, they were asked to do a motor agility test. They also had to complete an emotional measure on a 7-point Likert scale. We used linear regression as well double mediation macros in order to test the impacts of the coach’s paternalistic motivational speech on agility performance. Results: The results revealed direct effects of paternalism and valence on two measures of agility performance. Agility performance was worse when the speech was paternalistic (vs. no paternalistic) as well as when the speech was negative (vs. positive). When we compared negative paternalistic speech with the 3 others, we found that the direct effect of negative paternalism on performance is serially mediated, first by anxiety and, second by feeling of (in)competence. Conclusions: Acting in a fatherlike attitude might look like a good idea to motivate a sport team, using a little bit of father authority. But by doing so, in a negative way, the risk is that the team might perform badly instead. [less ▲]

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See detailGentlemen, Bring out Your Wallet, It’s Time to Pay: Benevolent Sexism and Women’s Economic Behaviour
Silvestre, Aude ULg; Sarlet, Marie ULg; Dardenne, Benoît ULg

Conference (2012, May 11)

Some women want to be flattered, cherished and protected by men more than others. We tested the hypothesis that this belief, that is, the personal endorsement of Benevolent Sexism (BS) as well as the ... [more ▼]

Some women want to be flattered, cherished and protected by men more than others. We tested the hypothesis that this belief, that is, the personal endorsement of Benevolent Sexism (BS) as well as the perceived BS of the men, would lead women to take economic decisions which fit traditional gender roles depicting men as women’s financial providers. In Study 1 (Ultimatum Game) and after answering to a BS scale, female participants were proposed fair, quite fair, and very unfair financial offers made by 39 male's faces that varied in perceived BS. When the financial proposition contradicted their beliefs about men as providers (when the offers were very unfair), more offers were rejected by high BS individuals and for high BS faces compared to their low BS counterparts. However, when the financial propositions were more fair, more offers were accepted by high BS individuals and for high BS faces. In Study 2 (Dictator Game), women high (vs. low) in BS propose more unfair offers to men. Moreover, women propose more unfair offers to men with high (vs. low) BS facial characteristics. Economic decisions are shaped by interpersonal as well as individual beliefs about how gender relationships ought to be. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Emotional Side of Paternalism: Do People Share What They Feel?
Silvestre, Aude ULg; Dardenne, Benoît ULg

Poster (2012, January 28)

We were interested in the kind of emotions felt and socially shared after experiencing paternalism (when A acts toward B with a fatherlike attitude) or blatant hostility. Participants had to read either a ... [more ▼]

We were interested in the kind of emotions felt and socially shared after experiencing paternalism (when A acts toward B with a fatherlike attitude) or blatant hostility. Participants had to read either a paternalist, hostile or factual version of the welcome speech of their new boss. They then were asked to write a text about how this day was going (social sharing measure). The results revealed that being the target of paternalism or hostility is an emotional episode which leads to social sharing of emotion. Hostility is a clearly negative episode, leading to negative social sharing. Paternalism is more ambiguous. Participants felt positive emotions (except for distrust) but they shared both positive and negative ones. Paternalism can be perceived as positive but seems to lead to negative outcomes. Our further step would be to test its negative effects on performance (reading span test). [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Is the Impact of Benevolent Sexism on Reactions Facing Unfairness?
Silvestre, Aude ULg

Master's dissertation (2009)

Social interactions between men and women are subject to lots of influences, be it during an encounter, on the work place, in an intimate relationship, etc. Moreover, whereas they are in a similar ... [more ▼]

Social interactions between men and women are subject to lots of influences, be it during an encounter, on the work place, in an intimate relationship, etc. Moreover, whereas they are in a similar situation, men and women react quite differently. Benevolent sexism is one of the factors that affect men-women relationships. In this dissertation, an experiment was built in order to study the impacts of benevolent sexism on relationships between men and women in a particular frame: the Ultimatum Game. The authors try to know the impacts of benevolent sexism on women’s behaviour during an Ultimatum Game, and that according to the context female participants are in. Female participants played the role of receivers who had to accept or reject offers proposed by photographs of men on the computer screen. The results of the experiment revealed that the kind of offer (fair, unfair, very unfair), the context (romantic or occupational) and the level of benevolent sexism as well as attractiveness of the photographed male’s faces will influence female participants’ behaviour and their decision-making process in an Ultimatum Game. The results will then be discussed and suggestions for future research will be put forward. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (4 ULg)