References of "Shaffii, Anahita"
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See detailInfluence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythm on executive discriminative ability during a constant routine
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep ... [more ▼]

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep pressure associated to the deterioration in brain efficiency. When wakefulness is extended into the circadian night, maintenance of cognitive performance is jeopardized . Some individuals are very vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep loss and circadian misalignment, whereas others are resilient. These individuals differences can be readily explained within the conceptual framework of the circadian and homeostatic regulation of performance but also by individual genetic differences and notably the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism. In this experiment, we investigated the consequences of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance during a working memory task (3-back). Following the signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target from non-target stimuli is estimated by d prime (d') and criterion (cr). Here we assessed whether d' and cr were modulated by the raising sleep need and the oscillatory circadian signal. We also tested whether the individual vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism influences this cognitive modulation, which is also driven by the sleep/wake regulation. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of acute sleep loss on the neural correlates of alerting, orientating and executive attention components
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012), 21(6), 648-58

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See detailSleep, memory and the hippocampus
Foret, Ariane; Mascetti, Laura ULg; Kussé, Caroline ULg et al

in Clinical Neurobiology of the Hippocampus (2012)

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See detailFunctional neuroimaging of the reciprocal influences between sleep and wakefulness.
JEDIDI, Zayd ULg; Rikir, Estelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Pflugers Archiv : European journal of physiology (2011), 463(1), 103-9

The activity patterns adopted by brain neuronal populations differ dramatically between wakefulness and sleep. However, these vigilance states are not independent and they reciprocally interact. Here, we ... [more ▼]

The activity patterns adopted by brain neuronal populations differ dramatically between wakefulness and sleep. However, these vigilance states are not independent and they reciprocally interact. Here, we provide evidence that in humans, regional brain activity during wakefulness is influenced by sleep regulation, namely by the interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian signals. We also show that, by contrast, regional brain activity during sleep is influenced by the experience acquired during the preceding waking period. These data reveal the dynamic interactions by which the succession of vigilance states support normal brain function and human cognition. [less ▲]

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See detailReciprocal interactions between wakefulness and sleep influence global and regional brain activity
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Mascetti, Laura ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

in Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry (2011), 11(19), 2403-13

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See detailA systems-level approach to human REM sleep
Matarazzo, Luca; Foret, Ariane; Mascetti, Laura ULg et al

in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function (2011)

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See detailNeural Correlates of Human NREM Sleep Oscillations
Foret, Ariane ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Hutt, Axel (Ed.) Sleep and Anesthesia (2011)

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See detailEpidemiology of pestivirus infection in wild ungulates of the French South Alps
Martin, C.; Letellier, C.; Caij, B. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 147(3-4), 320-328

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See detailSpontaneous neural activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2011), 193

Recent neuroimaging studies characterized the neural correlates of slow waves and spindles during human non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. They showed that significant activity was consistently ... [more ▼]

Recent neuroimaging studies characterized the neural correlates of slow waves and spindles during human non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. They showed that significant activity was consistently associated with slow (> 140 muV) and delta waves (75-140 muV) during NREM sleep in several cortical areas including inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate cortices. Unexpectedly, slow waves were also associated with transient responses in the pontine tegmentum and in the cerebellum. On the other hand, spindles were associated with a transient activity in the thalami, paralimbic areas (anterior cingulate and insular cortices), and superior temporal gyri. Moreover, slow spindles (11-13 Hz) were associated with increased activity in the superior frontal gyrus. In contrast, fast spindles (13-15 Hz) recruited a set of cortical regions involved in sensorimotor processing, as well as the mesial frontal cortex and hippocampus. These findings indicate that human NREM sleep is an active state during which brain activity is temporally organized by spontaneous oscillations (spindles and slow oscillation) in a regionally specific manner. The functional significance of these NREM sleep oscillations is currently interpreted in terms of synaptic homeostasis and memory consolidation. [less ▲]

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See detailExperience-dependent induction of hypnagogic images during daytime naps: a combined behavioural and EEG study.
Kussé, Caroline ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg; Schrouff, Jessica ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2011)

This study characterizes hypnagogic hallucinations reported during a polygraphically recorded 90-min daytime nap following or preceding practice of the computer game Tetris. In the experimental group (N ... [more ▼]

This study characterizes hypnagogic hallucinations reported during a polygraphically recorded 90-min daytime nap following or preceding practice of the computer game Tetris. In the experimental group (N = 16), participants played Tetris in the morning for 2 h during three consecutive days, while in a first control group (N = 13, controlling the effect of experience) participants did not play any game, and in a second control group (N = 14, controlling the effect of anticipation) participants played Tetris after the nap. During afternoon naps, participants were repetitively awakened 15, 45, 75, 120 or 180 s after the onset of S1, and were asked to report their mental content. Reports content was scored by three judges (inter-rater reliability 85%). In the experimental group, 48 out of 485 (10%) sleep-onset reports were Tetris-related. They mostly consisted of images and sounds with very little emotional content. They exactly reproduced Tetris elements or mixed them with other mnemonic components. By contrast, in the first control group, only one report out of 107 was scored as Tetris-related (1%), and in the second control group only three reports out of 112 were scored as Tetris-related (3%; between-groups comparison; P = 0.006). Hypnagogic hallucinations were more consistently induced by experience than by anticipation (P = 0.039), and they were predominantly observed during the transition of wakefulness to sleep. The observed attributes of experience-related hypnagogic hallucinations are consistent with the particular organization of regional brain activity at sleep onset, characterized by high activity in sensory cortices and in the default-mode network. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging of dreaming: state of the art and limitations
Kussé, Caroline ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Mascetti, Laura ULg et al

in International Review of Neurobiology (2010)

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See detailContributions du sommeil a la consolidation mnésique
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Matarazzo; Foret, Ariane ULg et al

in Biologie Aujourd'hui (2010), 204(2), 139-143

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (41 ULg)