References of "Sgambato, S"
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See detailInsulin effects on glucose kinetics in non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients with secondary failure to hypoglycaemic agents: role of different modes and rates of delivery.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Varricchio, M. et al

in European Journal of Medicine (The) (1992), 1(5), 261-7

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at investigating the effects of pulsatile and continuous insulin delivery on glucose kinetics in non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetic patients with secondary failure to ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at investigating the effects of pulsatile and continuous insulin delivery on glucose kinetics in non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetic patients with secondary failure to oral hypoglycaemic agents. METHODS: Seven type 2 diabetic patients underwent a 585 minute glucose-controlled glucose intravenous infusion using the Biostator. The endogenous pancreas secretion was inhibited by somatostatin. Three experiments were performed in each patient on different days and in random order. In all cases, glucagon was replaced (58 ng/min). The amounts of insulin infused were: a) 0.15 mU/kg x min continuously; b) 0.20 mU/kg x min continuously and c) 1.0 mU/kg x min in 2 minute pulses every 13 minutes. D-[3-3H]-glucose infusion allowed determination of glucose kinetics. RESULTS: Infusion of identical amounts of insulin (A vs C) demonstrated that pulsatile insulin delivery exerted greater metabolic effects (higher glucose infusion rate and, mainly at the beginning of the experiment, lower endogenous glucose production) than continuous infusion; furthermore pulsatile insulin delivery (C) exerted metabolic effects similar to those of a greater dose of insulin (B) infused continuously. CONCLUSIONS: In type 2 diabetic patients with secondary failure to oral hypoglycaemic agents, pulsatile insulin delivery exerts greater metabolic effects than continuous hormone delivery. [less ▲]

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See detailPulsatile insulin delivery has greater metabolic effects than continuous hormone administration in man: importance of pulse frequency.
Paolisso, G.; Scheen, André ULg; Giugliano, D. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1991), 72(3), 607-15

The aim of this study was to see if the greater effect of insulin on hepatic glucose output when insulin is given using 13-min pulses in man remains when the same amount of insulin is delivered using 26 ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to see if the greater effect of insulin on hepatic glucose output when insulin is given using 13-min pulses in man remains when the same amount of insulin is delivered using 26-min pulses. The study was performed on nine male healthy volunteers submitted to a 325 min glucose-controlled glucose iv infusion using the Biostator. The endogenous secretion of pancreatic hormones was inhibited by somatostatin. Three experiments were performed in each subject on different days and in random order. In all cases glucagon was replaced (58 ng min-1). The amounts of insulin infused were identical in all instances and were 0.2 mU kg-1 min-1 (continuous), 1.3 mU kg-1 min-1, 2 min on and 11 min off (13-min pulses) or 2.6 mU kg-1 min-1, 2 min on and 24 min off (26-min pulses). Blood glucose levels and glucose infusion rate were monitored continuously by the Biostator, and classic methodology using D-[3-3H] glucose infusion allowed to study glucose turnover. When compared with continuous insulin, 13-min insulin pulses induced a significantly greater inhibition of endogenous glucose production. This effect disappeared when insulin was delivered in 26-min pulses. We conclude that, in man, an adequate pulse frequency is required to allow the appearance of the greater inhibition of pulsatile insulin on endogenous glucose production. [less ▲]

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See detailPulsatile glucagon has greater hyperglycaemic, lipolytic and ketogenic effects than continuous hormone delivery in man: effect of age.
Paolisso, G.; Buonocore, S.; Gentile, S. et al

in Diabetologia (1990), 33(5), 272-7

The present study aimed at investigating the hyperglycaemic, lipolytic and ketogenic effects of small doses of glucagon delivered continuously or in a pulsatile manner. The study was performed in eight ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed at investigating the hyperglycaemic, lipolytic and ketogenic effects of small doses of glucagon delivered continuously or in a pulsatile manner. The study was performed in eight healthy young volunteers (24.2 +/- 1.2 years) and in eight healthy aged subjects (69.4 +/- 2.0 years). In all the subjects, endogenous pancreatic hormone secretion was inhibited by somatostatin and only glucagon was replaced. Consequently, the effects of pulsatile and continuous glucagon delivery were studied in conditions of progressive somatostatin-induced insulin deficiency. In both the young and the aged subjects, pulsatile glucagon delivery resulted in increases in plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acid, glycerol and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels greater than those observed when the same amount of glucagon was delivered in a continuous manner. The net increases in plasma glucose, glycerol and non-esterified fatty acid levels were similar between the young and the aged subjects when glucagon was infused continuously; in contrast, the rise in plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate in the aged was only about half that observed in the young subjects. Surprisingly, when glucagon was infused in a pulsatile manner, the rises in plasma glycerol, non-esterified fatty acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels were all significantly smaller in the aged subjects, while no significant differences were observed in the blood glucose responses. We conclude that, in the presence of somatostatin-induced insulin deficiency, pulsatile glucagon exerts greater effects on blood glucose, plasma non-esterified fatty acid, glycerol and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels than its continuous delivery. In the elderly, the lipolytic and ketogenic, but not the hyperglycaemic, responses to pulsatile glucagon are significantly reduced. [less ▲]

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See detailPulsatile insulin delivery is more efficient than continuous infusion in modulating islet cell function in normal subjects and patients with type 1 diabetes.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Torella, R. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1988), 66(6), 1220-6

The respective modulating effects of continuous and intermittent insulin delivery on pancreatic islet cell function were studied in seven normal men and nine insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetic patients ... [more ▼]

The respective modulating effects of continuous and intermittent insulin delivery on pancreatic islet cell function were studied in seven normal men and nine insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetic patients. In the normal men, saline or continuous (0.8 mU kg-1 min-1) or pulsatile (5.2 mU kg-1 min-1, with a switching on/off length of 2/11 min) human insulin were delivered on different days and in random order. Despite hyperinsulinemia, blood glucose was kept close to its basal value by the glucose clamp technique. The diabetic patients also were infused in random order and on different days with either saline or a smaller amount of insulin delivered continuously (0.15 mU kg-1 min-1) or in a pulsatile manner (0.97 mU kg-1 min-1 for 2 min, followed by 11 min during which no insulin was infused). In all experiments, 5 g arginine were given iv as a bolus dose 30 min before the end of the study, and plasma C-peptide and glucagon levels were determined to assess islet cell function. In the normal men, insulin administration resulted in a significant decline of basal plasma glucagon and C-peptide levels and in a clear-cut decrease in the arginine-induced glucagon response. These effects of insulin were significantly more marked when insulin was delivered in a pulsatile rather than a continuous manner. In the insulin-dependent diabetic patients, the lower dose of insulin infused continuously did not alter the basal or arginine-stimulated glucagon response. In contrast, when the same amount of insulin was delivered intermittently, arginine-induced glucagon release was greatly reduced. Thus, these data support the concept that insulin per se is a potent physiological modulator of islet A- and B-cell function. Furthermore, they suggest that these effects of insulin are reinforced when the hormone is administered in an intermittent manner in an attempt to reproduce the pulsatile physiological release of insulin. [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired insulin-induced erythrocyte magnesium accumulation is correlated to impaired insulin-mediated glucose disposal in type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Giugliano, D. et al

in Diabetologia (1988), 31(12), 910-5

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in 12 healthy subjects and 12 moderately obese patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Basal ... [more ▼]

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in 12 healthy subjects and 12 moderately obese patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Basal plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients than in control subjects. In vitro incubation in the presence of 100 mU/l insulin significantly increased magnesium erythrocyte levels in both control subjects (p less than 0.001) and patients with diabetes (p less than 0.001). However, even in the presence of 100 mU/l insulin, the erythrocyte magnesium content of patients with Type 2 diabetes was lower than that of control subjects. The in vitro dose-response curve of the effect of insulin on magnesium erythrocyte accumulation was shifted to the right when red cells of diabetic patients were used, with a highly significant reduction of the maximal effect. Such reduction of the maximal effect of insulin suggests that the impairment of insulin-induced erythrocyte magnesium accumulation observed in Type 2 diabetic patients results essentially from a post-receptor defect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailGreater efficacy of pulsatile insulin in type I diabetics critically depends on plasma glucagon levels.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Passariello, N. et al

in Diabetes (1987), 36(5), 566-70

The aim of this study was to investigate the role of plasma glucagon levels on the blood glucose response to intravenous insulin administered continuously or in a pulsatile manner. Six type I diabetic ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to investigate the role of plasma glucagon levels on the blood glucose response to intravenous insulin administered continuously or in a pulsatile manner. Six type I diabetic patients proven to have no residual insulin secretion were investigated. Endogenous glucagon secretion was inhibited by a continuous intravenous infusion of somatostatin (100 micrograms/h) and replaced by exogenous infusions of the hormone at three different rates (7.5, 4.5, and 2.5 micrograms/h), resulting in three different plasma glucagon steady-state levels (i.e., approximately equal to 200, approximately equal to 130, and approximately equal to 75 pg/ml, respectively). Each subject, in random order and on different days, was infused intravenously with regular human insulin either continuously (0.17 mU X kg-1 X min-1) or with the same amount of insulin infused in a pulsatile manner (0.85 mU X kg-1 X min-1 during 2 min followed by 8 min during which no insulin was infused). At plasma glucagon levels approximately equal to 200 pg/ml, blood glucose rose from approximately 10 to approximately 13 mM without any difference between the two modalities of insulin infusion. For plasma glucagon levels approximately equal to 130 pg/ml, plasma glucose remained steady throughout the experiments, but during the last 40 min, plasma glucose levels were significantly lower when insulin was administered intermittently. This greater blood glucose-lowering effect of pulsatile insulin occurred earlier and was more pronounced for plasma glucagon levels averaging 75 pg/ml. We conclude that the greater hypoglycemic effect of insulin administered intravenously in a pulsatile manner in type I diabetics critically depends on plasma glucagon circulating levels. [less ▲]

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See detailInsulin induces opposite changes in plasma and erythrocyte magnesium concentrations in normal man.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Passariello, N. et al

in Diabetologia (1986), 29(9), 644-7

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 10 healthy volunteers during an oral glucose tolerance test and during an euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic ... [more ▼]

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 10 healthy volunteers during an oral glucose tolerance test and during an euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic glucose clamp. At min 180 and 210 of the oral glucose tolerance test, a significant decline in plasma magnesium levels (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05 respectively) and a significant increase in erythrocyte magnesium levels (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05 respectively) were observed. Similar changes were seen during the second hour of the glucose clamp, during which euglycaemia (4.1 +/- 0.4 mmol/l) was maintained despite hyperinsulinaemia (110-130 mU/l). During in vitro incubations, glucose (5 mmol/l) did not modify erythrocyte magnesium levels. In contrast, erythrocyte magnesium levels were significantly increased (p less than 0.01) by insulin (100 mU/l), an effect entirely abolished by ouabain (5 X 10(-4) mol/l). These results suggest that insulin induces a shift of magnesium from the plasma to the erythrocytes both in vivo and in vitro. These data may help to interprete the abnormalities in magnesium circulating levels frequently reported in diabetic patients. [less ▲]

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