References of "Schulz, Rita"
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See detailNitrogen Isotope Ratios in Comets. ESO Astrophysics Symposia
Cochran, Anita L; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Precision Spectroscopy in Astrophysics (2008)

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See detailThe impact and rotational light curves of Comet 9P/Tempel 1
Manfroid, Jean ULg; Hutsemekers, Damien ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Icarus: International Journal of Solar System Studies (2007), 187

UVES and HIRES high-resolution spectra of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 are used to investigate the impact and rotational light curves of various species with a view toward building a simple model of the distribution ... [more ▼]

UVES and HIRES high-resolution spectra of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 are used to investigate the impact and rotational light curves of various species with a view toward building a simple model of the distribution and activity of the sources. The emission by OH, NH, CN, C[SUB]3[/SUB], CH, C[SUB]2[/SUB], NH[SUB]2[/SUB], and OI, are analyzed, as well as the light scattered by the dust. It is found that a simple model reproduces fairly well the impact light curves of all species combining the production of the observed molecules and the expansion of the material throughout the slit. The impact light curves are consistent with velocities of 400 600 m/s. Their modeling requires a three-step dissociation sequence ``Grand-Parent --> Parent --> Daughter'' to produce the observed molecules. The rotational light curve for each species is explained in terms of a single model with three sources. The dust component can however not easily be explained that way. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact and rotational light curves of Comet 9P/Tempel 1
Manfroid, Jean ULg; Hutsemekers, Damien ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Icarus: International Journal of Solar System Studies (2007), 191

UVES and HIRES high-resolution spectra of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 are used to investigate the impact and rotational light curves of various species with a view toward building a simple model of the distribution ... [more ▼]

UVES and HIRES high-resolution spectra of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 are used to investigate the impact and rotational light curves of various species with a view toward building a simple model of the distribution and activity of the sources. The emission by OH, NH, CN, C[SUB]3[/SUB], CH, C[SUB]2[/SUB], NH[SUB]2[/SUB], and OI, are analyzed, as well as the light scattered by the dust. It is found that a simple model reproduces fairly well the impact light curves of all species combining the production of the observed molecules and the expansion of the material throughout the slit. The impact light curves are consistent with velocities of 400 600 m/s. Their modeling requires a three-step dissociation sequence ``Grand-Parent --> Parent --> Daughter'' to produce the observed molecules. The rotational light curve for each species is explained in terms of a single model with three sources. The dust component can however not easily be explained that way. [less ▲]

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See detailAnomalous Nitrogen Isotope Ratio in Comets
Arpigny, Claude ULg; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Science (2003), 301

High-resolution spectra of the CN B[SUP]2[/SUP] Sigma[SUP]+[/SUP]-X[SUP]2[/SUP] Sigma[SUP]+[/SUP] (0,0) band at 390 nanometers yield isotopic ratios for comets C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR ... [more ▼]

High-resolution spectra of the CN B[SUP]2[/SUP] Sigma[SUP]+[/SUP]-X[SUP]2[/SUP] Sigma[SUP]+[/SUP] (0,0) band at 390 nanometers yield isotopic ratios for comets C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR) as follows: 165 +/- 40 and 115 +/- 20 for [SUP]12[/SUP]C/[SUP]13[/SUP]C, 140 +/- 35 and 140 +/- 30 for [SUP]14[/SUP]N/[SUP]15[/SUP]N. Our N isotopic measurements are lower than the terrestrial [SUP]14[/SUP]N/[SUP]15[/SUP]N = 272 and the ratio for Hale-Bopp from measurements of HCN, the presumed parent species of CN. This isotopic anomaly suggests the existence of other parent(s) of CN, with an even lower N isotopic ratio. Organic compounds like those found in interplanetary dust particles are good candidates. [less ▲]

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