References of "Schroeder, Hélène"
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See detailCancer du sein : de la thérapie ciblée à la médecine personnalisée
JERUSALEM, Guy ULg; COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg; Josse, Claire ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2015), 70(5-6), 269-276

Dans cet article, les auteurs passent en revue les grands principes de prise en charge du traitement systémique du cancer du sein et posent la question suivante : jusqu'où réellement aujourd'hui ce ... [more ▼]

Dans cet article, les auteurs passent en revue les grands principes de prise en charge du traitement systémique du cancer du sein et posent la question suivante : jusqu'où réellement aujourd'hui ce traitement est-il individualisé ? Les nouvelles technologies permettent une analyse détaillée des anomalies génomiques au niveau des cellules cancéreuses. Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas encore compris comment utiliser au mieux ces données au bénéfice du patient. La majorité des modifications du génome sont des évènements relativement rares compliquant le développement de nouveaux médicaments dans le cadre d'une médecine de précision. De plus, les tumeurs présentent une grande hétérogénéité temporelle et spatiale dont il faudra tenir compte lors de ce développement. Une collaboration internationale intensive est en cours pour tenter de confirmer que la médecine de précision permet d'optimiser les résultats du traitement systémique dans le cancer du sein. [less ▲]

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See detailCancer du sein: intérêt du bilan d’extension par imagerie lors du diagnostic initial et du suivi les trois premières années après le diagnostic
SCHROEDER, Hélène ULg; Hanocq, Florence ULg; COLLIGNON, Joëlle ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2015), 70(3), 140-147

In our region, repeated tumor staging by radiological procedures aiming to detect relapses and/or metastases from breast cancer is frequently performed. However, these procedures are not recommended by ... [more ▼]

In our region, repeated tumor staging by radiological procedures aiming to detect relapses and/or metastases from breast cancer is frequently performed. However, these procedures are not recommended by current international guidelines. We retrospectively analyzed the charts from 818 patients with a new diagnosis of breast cancer seen at CHU Liege between 2005 and 2009. We assessed the role of staging procedures at initial diagnosis and during follow-up the first 3 years after the diagnosis of breast cancer. Twenty-six patients presented with metastatic disease at diagnosis and 55 patients developed loco-regional relapses or metastases during follow-up. For asymptomatic patients, imaging procedures only detected tumor metastases or relapse without elevated tumor markers in 9 patients at initial diagnosis and 10 patients during follow-up. The diagnosis of an asymptomatic relapse and/or metastases had no positive impact on progression-free or overall survival. The anatomic extension identified patients at high risk for presenting distant metastases already at the time of initial diagnosis and the biological aggressiveness evaluated by Ki-67 was an important prognostic factor for early relapse. In view of these results, we do not recommend staging and searching for metastatic disease in asymptomatic patients presenting early stage breast cancer with low expression of the Ki-67 at the time of initial diagnosis. We also do not recommend repeated staging and searching for metastases by imaging in asymptomatic patients during routine follow-up. Staging should only be performed if a relapse is suspected during follow-up. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibody production by injection of living cells expressing non self antigens as cell surface type II transmembrane fusion protein.
Nizet, Yannick; Gillet, Laurent ULg; SCHROEDER, Hélène ULg et al

in Journal of immunological methods (2011)

Antigen expression and purification are laborious, time consuming and frequently difficult steps in the process of antibody production. In the present study, we developed a method avoiding these two steps ... [more ▼]

Antigen expression and purification are laborious, time consuming and frequently difficult steps in the process of antibody production. In the present study, we developed a method avoiding these two steps. This method relies on the injection of histocompatible living cells stably expressing the antigen as a cell surface type II transmembrane fusion protein. A vector, nicknamed pCD1-CD134L, was constructed to express the antigen fused at the carboxyterminal end of the human CD134 ligand (CD134L) type II transmembrane protein on the surface of eucaryotic cells. This vector was shown to induce cell surface expression of epitopes from human c-Myc (soluble protein), uterogloblin-related protein 1 (secreted protein) and CD94 (type II transmembrane protein). Using this vector, we developed a method to produce antibodies without antigen production. The flowchart of this method is as follows: (i) cloning of the antigen in the pCD1-CD134L vector; (ii) production of a histocompatible cell line stably expressing the CD134L-antigen fusion protein; (iii) testing for cell surface expression of the fusion protein by targeting the CD134L carrier; and (iv) prime-boost immunisation with living cells expressing the fusion protein. This method was successfully used for production of polyclonal antibodies raised against Ixodes ricinus calreticulin (secreted protein) in mice and for production of monoclonal antibodies raised against an epitope of Vaccinia virus A56 (type I transmembrane protein) protein in rat. The present study is the first to demonstrate the use of a type II transmembrane protein as a carrier for cell surface display of antigens. [less ▲]

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See detailSubversion of complement by hematophagous parasites
SCHROEDER, Hélène ULg; SKELLY, PJ; ZIPFEL, PF et al

in Developmental & Comparative Immunology (2009), 33(1), 5-13

The complement system is a crucial part of innate and adaptive immunity which exerts a significant evolutionary pressure on pathogens. It has selected for those pathogens, mainly microorganisms but also ... [more ▼]

The complement system is a crucial part of innate and adaptive immunity which exerts a significant evolutionary pressure on pathogens. It has selected for those pathogens, mainly microorganisms but also parasites, that have evolved countermeasures. The characterization of how pathogens evade complement attack is a rapidly developing field of current research. In recent years, multiple complement evasion strategies have been characterized. In this review, we focus on complement escape mechanisms expressed by hematophagous parasites, a heterogeneous group of metazoan parasites that share the property of ingesting the whole blood of their host. Complement inhibition is crucial for parasite survival within the host tissue or to facilitate blood feeding. Finally, complement inhibition by hematophagous parasites may also contribute to their success as pathogen vectors. [less ▲]

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See detailThe paralogous salivary anti-complement proteins IRAC I and IRAC II encoded by Ixodes ricinus ticks have broad and complementary inhibitory activities against the complement of different host species.
Schroeder, Hélène ULg; Daix, Virginie; Gillet, Laurent ULg et al

in Microbes & Infection (2007), 9(2), 247-50

Several observations suggest that inhibition of the host complement alternative pathway by Ixodes tick saliva is crucial to achieve blood feeding. We recently described two paralogous anti-complement ... [more ▼]

Several observations suggest that inhibition of the host complement alternative pathway by Ixodes tick saliva is crucial to achieve blood feeding. We recently described two paralogous anti-complement proteins called Ixodes ricinus anti-complement (IRAC) proteins I and II co-expressed in I. ricinus salivary glands. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that these sequences were diversifying by a process of positive Darwinian selection, possibly leading to molecules with different biological properties. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that each paralogue may have different inhibitory activities against the complement of different natural host species, thereby contributing to broaden the host range of I. ricinus ticks. IRAC I and IRAC II were tested against the complement of eight I. ricinus natural host species (six mammals and two birds). The results demonstrate that IRAC I and IRAC II have broad and complementary inhibition activities against the complement of different host species. This report is the first description of paralogous anti-complement molecules encoded by a pathogen with broad and complementary inhibitory activities against the complement of different host species. [less ▲]

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See detailIxodes ticks belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex encode a family of anticomplement proteins.
Daix, Virginie ULg; Schroeder, Hélène ULg; Praet, N. et al

in Insect Molecular Biology (2007), 16(2), 155-66

The alternative pathway of complement is an important innate defence against pathogens including ticks. This component of the immune system has selected for pathogens that have evolved countermeasures ... [more ▼]

The alternative pathway of complement is an important innate defence against pathogens including ticks. This component of the immune system has selected for pathogens that have evolved countermeasures. Recently, a salivary protein able to inhibit the alternative pathway was cloned from the American tick Ixodes scapularis (Valenzuela et al., 2000; J. Biol. Chem. 275, 18717-18723). Here, we isolated two different sequences, similar to Isac, from the transcriptome of I. ricinus salivary glands. Expression of these sequences revealed that they both encode secreted proteins able to inhibit the complement alternative pathway. These proteins, called I. ricinus anticomplement (IRAC) protein I and II, are coexpressed constitutively in I. ricinus salivary glands and are upregulated during blood feeding. Also, we demonstrated that they are the products of different genes and not of alleles of the same locus. Finally, phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that ticks belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex encode a family of relatively small anticomplement molecules undergoing diversification by positive Darwinian selection. [less ▲]

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