References of "Schabus, M"
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See detailThe fate of incoming stimuli during NREM sleep is determined by spindles and the phase of the slow oscillation
Schabus, M.; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Heib, D. P. J. et al

in Frontiers in Neurology (2012), 3(40), 1-11

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See detailHierarchical clustering of brain activity during human nonrapid eye movement sleep.
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Perlbarg, V; Marrelec, G et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2012)

Consciousness is reduced during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to changes in brain function that are still poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that impaired consciousness during NREM ... [more ▼]

Consciousness is reduced during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to changes in brain function that are still poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that impaired consciousness during NREM sleep is associated with an increased modularity of brain activity. Cerebral connectivity was quantified in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging times series acquired in 13 healthy volunteers during wakefulness and NREM sleep. The analysis revealed a modification of the hierarchical organization of large-scale networks into smaller independent modules during NREM sleep, independently from EEG markers of the slow oscillation. Such modifications in brain connectivity, possibly driven by sleep ultraslow oscillations, could hinder the brain's ability to integrate information and account for decreased consciousness during NREM sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking memory load affects chronotype- and time-of-day dependent cerebral activity modulations
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2010), 19(Suppl. 2),

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See detailSpectral quality of light modulates emotional brain responses in humans
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Schwartz, S.; Grandjean, D. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010), 107(45), 19549-54

Light therapy can be an effective treatment for mood disorders, suggesting that light is able to affect mood state in the long term. As a first step to understand this effect, we hypothesized that light ... [more ▼]

Light therapy can be an effective treatment for mood disorders, suggesting that light is able to affect mood state in the long term. As a first step to understand this effect, we hypothesized that light might also acutely influence emotion and tested whether short exposures to light modulate emotional brain responses. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, 17 healthy volunteers listened to emotional and neutral vocal stimuli while being exposed to alternating 40-s periods of blue or green ambient light. Blue (relative to green) light increased responses to emotional stimuli in the voice area of the temporal cortex and in the hippocampus. During emotional processing, the functional connectivity between the voice area, the amygdala, and the hypothalamus was selectively enhanced in the context of blue illumination, which shows that responses to emotional stimulation in the hypothalamus and amygdala are influenced by both the decoding of vocal information in the voice area and the spectral quality of ambient light. These results demonstrate the acute influence of light and its spectral quality on emotional brain processing and identify a unique network merging affective and ambient light information. [less ▲]

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See detailRejection of pulse related artefact (PRA) from continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using constraint independent component analysis (cICA).
Leclercq, Yves ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2009), 44(3), 679-91

Rejection of the pulse related artefact (PRA) from electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded simultaneously with fMRI data is difficult, particularly during NREM sleep because of the similarities ... [more ▼]

Rejection of the pulse related artefact (PRA) from electroencephalographic (EEG) time series recorded simultaneously with fMRI data is difficult, particularly during NREM sleep because of the similarities between sleep slow waves and PRA, in both temporal and frequency domains and the need to work with non-averaged data. Here we introduce an algorithm based on constrained independent component analysis (cICA) for PRA removal. This method has several advantages: (1) automatic detection of the components corresponding to the PRA; (2) stability of the solution and (3) computational treatability. Using multichannel EEG recordings obtained in a 3 T MR scanner, with and without concomitant fMRI acquisition, we provide evidence for the sensitivity and specificity of the method in rejecting PRA in various sleep and waking conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral correlates of False Memories after Sleep and Sleep Deprivation
Darsaud, A.; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg et al

Poster (2008, April)

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See detailIntrinsic brain activity in altered states of consciousness: how conscious is the default mode of brain function?
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Tshibanda, Luaba ULg et al

in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (2008), 1129

Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain-behavior relationships ... [more ▼]

Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain-behavior relationships has been challenged. That altered states of consciousness are a privileged way to study the relationships between spontaneous brain activity and behavior is proposed, and common resting-state brain activity features observed in various states of altered consciousness are reviewed. Early positron emission tomography studies showed that states of extremely low or high brain activity are often associated with unconsciousness. However, this relationship is not absolute, and the precise link between global brain metabolism and awareness remains yet difficult to assert. In contrast, voxel-based analyses identified a systematic impairment of associative frontoparieto-cingulate areas in altered states of consciousness, such as sleep, anesthesia, coma, vegetative state, epileptic loss of consciousness, and somnambulism. In parallel, recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified structured patterns of slow neuronal oscillations in the resting human brain. Similar coherent blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) systemwide patterns can also be found, in particular in the default-mode network, in several states of unconsciousness, such as coma, anesthesia, and slow-wave sleep. The latter results suggest that slow coherent spontaneous BOLD fluctuations cannot be exclusively a reflection of conscious mental activity, but may reflect default brain connectivity shaping brain areas of most likely interactions in a way that transcends levels of consciousness, and whose functional significance remains largely in the dark. [less ▲]

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See detailVoluntary brain processing in disorders of consciousness
Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Perrin, F.; Schabus, M. et al

in Neurology (2008), 71(20), 1614-1620

Background: Disentangling the vegetative state from the minimally conscious state is often difficult when relying only on behavioral observation. In this study, we explored a new active evoked related ... [more ▼]

Background: Disentangling the vegetative state from the minimally conscious state is often difficult when relying only on behavioral observation. In this study, we explored a new active evoked related potentials paradigm as an alternative method for the detection of voluntary brain activity. Methods: The participants were 22 right-handed patients (10 traumatic) diagnosed as being in a vegetative state (VS) (n 8) or in a minimally conscious state (MCS) (n 14). They were presented sequences of names containing the patient’s own name or other names, in both passive and active conditions. In the active condition, the patients were instructed to count her or his own name or to count another target name. Results: Like controls, MCS patients presented a larger P3 to the patient’s own name, in the passive and in the active conditions. Moreover, the P3 to target stimuli was higher in the active than in the passive condition, suggesting voluntary compliance to task instructions like controls. These responses were even observed in patients with low behavioral responses (e.g., visual fixationand pursuit). In contrast, no P3 differences between passive and active conditions were observed for VS patients. Conclusions: The present results suggest that active evoked-related potentials paradigms may permit detection of voluntary brain function in patients with severe brain damage who present with a disorder of consciousness, even when the patient may present with very limited to questionablyany signs of awareness. [less ▲]

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See detailActive brain processes during human quiescent sleep: an EEG/fMRI study of non-REM slow oscillations
Dang-Vu, T.; Schabus, M.; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2007, May), 254(Suppl. 3), 50

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See detailHow should functional imaging of patients with disorders of consciousness contribute to their clinical rehabilitation needs?
Laureys, Steven ULg; Giacino, J. T.; Schiff, N. D. et al

in Current Opinion in Neurology (2006), 19(6), 520-527

Purpose of review We discuss the problems of evidence-based neurorehabilitation in disorders of consciousness, and recent functional neuroimaging data obtained in the vegetative state and minimally ... [more ▼]

Purpose of review We discuss the problems of evidence-based neurorehabilitation in disorders of consciousness, and recent functional neuroimaging data obtained in the vegetative state and minimally conscious state. Recent findings Published data are insufficient to make recommendations for or against any of the neurorehabilitative treatments in vegetative state and minimally conscious state patients. Electrophysiological and functional imaging studies have been shown to be useful in measuring residual brain function in noncommunicative brain-damaged patients. Despite the fact that such studies could in principle allow an objective quantification of the putative cerebral effect of rehabilitative treatment in the vegetative state and minimally conscious state, they have so far not been used in this context. Summary Without controlled studies and careful patient selection criteria it will not be possible to evaluate the potential of therapeutic interventions in disorders of consciousness. There also is a need to elucidate the neurophysiological effects of such treatments. Integration of multimodal neuroimaging techniques should eventually improve our ability to disentangle differences in outcome on the basis of underlying mechanisms and better guide our therapeutic options in the challenging patient populations encountered following severe acute brain damage. [less ▲]

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See detailSuperiority of blue (470 nm) light in eliciting non-image forming brain responses during auditory working memory in humans: a fMRI study
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Gais, S.; Schabus, M. et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2006, September), 15(Suppl. 1), 54

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See detailActive brain processes during human quiescent sleep
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schabus, M.; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2006, September), 15(Suppl. 1), 51

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See detailNeural correlates of sleep spindles as revealed by simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI)
Schabus, M.; Dang-Vu, T.; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2006, September), 15(Suppl. 1), 50-51

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See detailBrain response to one's own name in vegetative state, minimally conscious state and locked-in syndrome
Perrin, F.; Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Schabus, M. et al

in Archives of Neurology (2006), 63

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (7 ULg)