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See detailRELEVANCE OF A SYSTEMATIC GERIATRIC SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT IN OLDER PATIENTS WITH CANCER RESULTS OF A PROSPECTIVE MULTICENTRIC STUDY
Kenis, C; Bron, D; Libert, Y et al

in Annals of Oncology (2013)

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See detailSymptom attribution and radiation thérapy for breast cancer : changes over time and associated psychological factors
Bonamis, O.; Liénard, A.; Coucke, Philippe ULg et al

in Psycho-oncology (2009, June), 18 (Suppl. 2)

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See detailFactors influencing physicians' detection of cancer patients' and relatives distress : can a communication skills training program improve physicians' detection?
Merckaert, I.; Libert, Y.; Delvaux, N. et al

in Psycho-oncology (2008), 17

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See detailPhysicians are different when they learn communication skills: influence of the locus of control
Libert, Yves; Merckaert, I.; Reynaert, C. et al

in Psycho-Oncology (2007), 16(6), 553-562

Purpose: Although it is widely recognised that educational interventions may be more effective for people with an 'internal' Locus of Control (who believe that life outcomes are controlled by their own ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Although it is widely recognised that educational interventions may be more effective for people with an 'internal' Locus of Control (who believe that life outcomes are controlled by their own characteristics or actions) compared to people with an 'external' Locus of Control (who believe that life outcomes are controlled by external forces such as luck, fate or others), no study has yet assessed the influence of physicians' Locus of Control (LOC) on communication skills learning. This study aims to test the hypothesis that, in a communication skills training program, physicians with an 'internal' LOC would demonstrate communication skills acquisition to a greater degree than those with an 'external' LOC. Methods: A non-randomised longitudinal intervention study was conducted between January 1999 and April 2001. Sixty-seven volunteer physicians from private and institutional practice in Belgium participated in a learner-centred, skills-focused, practice-oriented communication skills training program. Communication skills changes were assessed in 2 standardised simulated interviews before and after training (one two-person and one three-person interview). Communication skills were assessed using the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Physicians' LOC was assessed using the Rotter I-E scale. Communication skills changes of the upper and lower third of physicians in respect of their scores on this scale were compared using group by time repeated measures of variance. Results: In the two-person and three-person interviews, changes in the use of open directive questions were more important among physicians with an "internal" LOC compared with changes observed among physicians with an 'external' LOC (P = 0.066 and P = 0.004, respectively). In the three-person interview, changes in the use of directive questions, assessing functions and moderate feelings stated explicitly were more important among physicians with an 'internal' LOC compared with changes observed among physicians with an 'external' LOC (P = 0.001; P = 0.002 and P = 0.011 respectively). Conclusion: This study shows that physicians' LOC is a psychological characteristic that could influence the efficacy of a communication skills training program. This evidence supports the idea that a psychological characteristic such as 'internal' LOC may facilitate communication skills acquisition through physicians' belief that communication with patients may be controlled by physicians themselves. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley [less ▲]

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See detailPhysicians' communication with a cancer patient and a relative - A randomized study assessing the efficacy of consolidation workshops
Delvaux, N.; Merckaert, I.; Marchal, S. et al

in Cancer (2005), 103(11), 2397-2411

BACKGROUND. Although patients with cancer are often accompanied by a relative during medical interviews, to the authors' knowledge little is known regarding the efficacy of communication skills training ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND. Although patients with cancer are often accompanied by a relative during medical interviews, to the authors' knowledge little is known regarding the efficacy of communication skills training programs on physicians' communication skills in this context. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy of 6 consolidation workshops, 3 hours in length, that were conducted after a 2.5-day basic training program. METHODS. After attending the basic training program, physicians were assigned randomly to consolidation workshops or to a waiting list. Training efficacy was assessed through simulated and actual interviews that were recorded on an audio tape at baseline, after consolidation workshops for the consolidation-workshops group, and 5 months after the end of basic training for the waiting-list group. Communication skills were assessed according to the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Patients' and relatives' perceptions of and satisfaction with physicians' communication performance were assessed using a 15-item questionnaire. RESULTS. Sixty-two physicians completed the training program. Compared with physicians who participated to the basic training program, when addressing the patient, physicians who were randomized to the consolidation workshops used more open, open directive, and screening questions (P = 0.011 in simulated patient interviews and P = 0.005 in actual patient interviews) and elicited and clarified psychologic concerns more often (P = 0.006 in simulated patient interviews and P < 0.001 in actual patient interviews). When they addressed the relative, physicians who were randomized to the consolidation workshops gave less premature information (P = 0.032 in simulated patient interviews and P < 0.001 in actual patient interviews). When they addressed the patient and the relative simultaneously, physicians who were randomized to the consolidation workshops used more empathy, educated guesses, alerting to reality, confronting, negotiating, and summarizing (P = 0.003 in simulated patient interviews and P = 0.024 in actual patient interviews). Patients, but not relatives, who interacted with physicians in the consolidation-workshops group were more satisfied globally with the interviews (P = 0.022). CONCLUSIONS. Six 3-hour consolidation workshops resulted in improved communication skills addressed to patients and to relatives. The current results showed that the transfer of skills addressing relatives' concerns remained limited and that consolidation workshops should focus even more systematically on the practice of three-person interviews. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to optimize physicians' communication skills in cancer care: Results of a randomized study assessing the usefulness of posttraining consolidation workshops
Razavi, D.; Merckaert, I.; Marchal, Sylvie ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2003), 21(16), 3141-3149

Purpose: Although there is wide recognition of the usefulness of improving physicians' communication skills, no studies have yet assessed the efficacy of post-training consolidation workshops. This study ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Although there is wide recognition of the usefulness of improving physicians' communication skills, no studies have yet assessed the efficacy of post-training consolidation workshops. This study aims to assess the efficacy of six 3-hour consolidation workshops conducted after a 2.5-day basic training program. Methods: Physicians, after attending the basic training program, were randomly assigned to consolidation workshops or to a waiting list. Training efficacy was assessed through simulated and actual patient interviews that were audiotaped at baseline and after consolidation workshops for the consolidation-workshop group, and approximately 5 months after the end of basic training for the waiting-list group. Communication skills were assessed according to the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Patients' perceptions of communication skills improvement were assessed using a 14-item questionnaire. Results : Sixty-three physicians completed the training program. Communication skills improved significantly more in the consolidation-workshop group compared with the waiting-list group. In simulated interviews, group-by-time repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant increase in open and open directive questions (P =.014) and utterances alerting patients to reality (P =.049), as well as a significant decrease in premature reassurance (P =.042). In actual patient interviews, results revealed a significant increase in acknowledgments (P =.022) and empathic statements (P =.009), in educated guesses (P =.041), and in negotiations (P =.008). Patients interacting with physicians who benefited from consolidation workshops reported higher scores concerning their physicians' understanding of their disease (P =.004). Conclusion: Consolidation workshops further improve a communication skills training program's efficacy and facilitate the transfer of acquired skills to clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of medical specialist' locus of control on communication skills in oncological interviews
Libert, Y.; Janne, P.; Razavi, D. et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2003), 88

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