References of "Sartelet, Arnaud"
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See detailArthrodèse du carpe chez le veau
Djebala, Salem ULg; Touati, Kamal ULg; Sartelet, Arnaud ULg

in Point Vétérinaire (2016), 365

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See detailTénotomie chez le veau
Djebala, Salem ULg; Sartelet, Arnaud ULg

in Point Vétérinaire (2016), 363

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See detailL'abdomen aigu chez le bovin du diagnostic au traitement : un challenge pour le praticien
Sartelet, Arnaud ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailL'échographie bovine: une autre utilité ... chez le veau
Sartelet, Arnaud ULg; Knapp, Emilie ULg; Rao, Anne-Sophie ULg et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailParage et Chirurgie du Pied de Bovin
Sartelet, Arnaud ULg; Frisee, Vincent ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailA stop-gain in the laminin, alpha 3 gene causes recessive junctional epidermolysis bullosa in Belgian Blue cattle
Sartelet, Arnaud ULg; Harland, Chad ULg; Tamma, Nico ULg et al

in Animal Genetics (2015), 46(5), 566-570

Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity ... [more ▼]

Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity mapping located the causative gene in a 8.3-Mb interval on bovine chromosome 24. Combining information from (i) whole-genome sequencing of an affected calf, (ii) transcriptomic data from a panel of tissues and (iii) a list of functionally ranked positional candidates pinpointed a private G to A nucleotide substitution in the LAMA3 gene that creates a premature stop codon (p.Arg2609*) in exon 60, truncating 22% of the corresponding protein. The LAMA3 gene encodes the alpha 3 subunit of the heterotrimeric laminin-332, a key constituent of the lamina lucida that is part of the skin basement membrane connecting epidermis and dermis layers. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in this gene are known to cause severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa in human, mice, horse, sheep and dog. Overall, our data strongly support the causality of the identified gene and mutation. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic Toxic Hepatitis in Beef Calves due to Mycotoxins in Mixed Feed
Theron, Léonard ULg; Callebaut, Alfons; Bayrou, Calixte ULg et al

in Zemljic, Borut; Podpecan, Ozbalt; Zmljic-Jokhadar, Spela (Eds.) Proceedings of the XV middle European Buiatric Congress (2015, June 10)

Mycotoxins intoxination is an emerging disorder in Belgium, due to evolution of cultural practices and harvesting weather conditions. These intoxinations are difficult to diagnose for the vet practioners ... [more ▼]

Mycotoxins intoxination is an emerging disorder in Belgium, due to evolution of cultural practices and harvesting weather conditions. These intoxinations are difficult to diagnose for the vet practioners, since unspecific clinical signs, and their impact on ruminant disorder remains controversial. Although legal concentrations have been established for mycotoxins in the EU, farm forages are most of the time not tested (EU 2006/576/EC). In January 2015, a 500 calvings cross-bred Belgian blue cattle herd (BVDV free) referred a second (the first was directly sent to the rendering-plant) unexplained fatal case of jaundice on a 2 months-old calf to the Clinic for Ruminants of the University of Liège for necropsy. In 2013, a case of jaundice due to a Salmonella dublin hepatocholecystitis had previously diagnosed in this farm (Ronzoni et al., 2014), but so far preventions measures were implemented. Necropsy revealed generalized icterus, mild bilirubinuria, splenomegaly, but no precise etiology. On February a second 2 month old calf with jaundice is referred, lethargic, normothermic with a mild diarrhea, Calf shown generalized jaundice, anemia, elevation of leukocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes), TGO, bilirubinemia, total biliary acids and Globulins (alpha2). He had also diminished erythrocytes and albuminemia. Copraemia, leptospirosis serology, leademia, hemoculture and pancreatic enzymes were within normal ranges, ruling out classic causes of jaundice in calf. Abdomen ultrasonography revealed a mild hyperechogenicity of the liver but no gall bladder modifications. Symptomatic treatment was based on symptoms, with fluidotherapy and choleretics. A third calf was referred three days after in a worst clinical condition, with also a severely modified liver enzymes, but no anemia. Three days after, this calf died and a necropsy revealed petechiae and hemorrhages in the abomasum, congestive mucosae in the distal bowel, white depot in the kidney medulla, modified urine and splenomegaly. Bile bacteriology and leptospirosis PCR was negative and liver histopathology revealed a severe histopathological liver degeneration associated with a disruption of the parenchyma and marked hyperplasia of the bile ducts compatible with chronic metabolic disorder. Meanwhile, the anemic calf recovered from anemia without any treatment after 4 days and was discharged from the Clinic for Ruminants. Considering the weird clinical patterns of these jaundice cases, and the fact that only calves from 2 to 3 months were affected, a nutritional origin as etiology was suspected. To test it, eight clinically healthy two to three months-old calves, of two different pens were sampled. TGO, GLDH, GGT or biliary acids were either modified and the values tended to increase with the age of the calves. The water was analyzed for classic toxics, and cultured for total germ content and everything were within recommended values. The calves fed with a milk replacer (30 % milk powder), and a commercial calf starter until one month of age. Then, they were given a mixed feed (containing cereal mix, cocoa, beet pulp, soja, maize), made at the farm from primary product/byproducts bought from different sources. The mix was tested for mycotoxins presence and ranged from 0.8 to 1.5 ppm of Desoxynivalenone (DON), and 115-215 ppb of Zearalenone (ZEA). The principal source of DON was maize (3.1 to 6.2 ppm), as for ZEA (0.3-0.6 ppm), but several compounds contained small dose of DON (0.2-0.7 ppm) for Barley feed, Tanned soja. Cacao contained 2.7 to 5.9 ppb of Ochratoxine (OTA). Nutritionnal recommendations were immediately given with a change in the source of maize and an addition of clay and yeast at 40g/calf/day and hay. Since, any other hypothetic origin to this progressive hepatic intoxination was demostrated, and that the doses founded, even if barely legal in the mix, are not accounted for toxic in the EU regulation, we believe that the calves were chronically exposed to these toxins. However, some mycotoxins experts still claim that various clinical signs would be observed in ruminants, if the rumen is partially defaunated, like in our case with the lake of forage. We propose that monitoring of subclinical liver health could be a key to screen DON effects. [less ▲]

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See detailChirurgie de l'atrésie anale du veau
Arengi, Ada; Sartelet, Arnaud ULg

in Point Vétérinaire (2015), 353

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See detailLordose et/ou xyphose chez le porc : mise à l’épreuve de l’hypothèse héréditaire
Laitat, Martine ULg; Veillat, Emilie; Van Cauwenberge, Henry et al

Poster (2015, February)

Lordosis and/or kyphosis, also called ”dipped shoulder” or ”humpy‐back” is sporadically observed in growing pigs. This condition is characterized by a thoracic and/or lumbar spinal deformity ... [more ▼]

Lordosis and/or kyphosis, also called ”dipped shoulder” or ”humpy‐back” is sporadically observed in growing pigs. This condition is characterized by a thoracic and/or lumbar spinal deformity. Pathomorphologically, it may be comparable with Scheuermann’s kyphosis in man and so constitutes a spontaneous model for this humane kyphosis of the thoracic or thoracolumbar spine. In pigs, this condition may decrease the value of carcasses, making deboning efforts challenging. Three major and non‐exclusive hypotheses formulated to explain these back deformations are nutrition, intrauterine viral infection and inherited predisposition. The objective of the present study was to test the latter and, if possible, to identify a locus (some loci) associated with the affection. Forty‐eight pigs were included in this case‐control study. Based on a clinical examination and/or on a measure of the degree of spinal deformity, 25 pigs classified as affected were compared to 23 pigs considered as normal. A whole genome Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed using a 50,000 SNP array. DNA from forty‐seven samples (tail tissue or blood) was extracted while one sample was eliminated because of its poor quality. After applying quality controls, 40 pigs and 57,838 SNPs (on a total of 62,163) remained for further analysis. One SNP (ASGA0090747) located on Sus scrofa chromosome SSC8 crossed the genome‐wide significant threshold and is thus suspected of being associated with the lordosis and/or kyphosis phenotype. These results seem to confirm the hereditary hypothesis. Further investigations are however needed to confirm the suspected association. [less ▲]

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See detailLes utilités de l’échographie chez le bovin en dehors du suivi de reproduction
Sartelet, Arnaud ULg; Knapp, Emilie ULg; Rao, Anne-Sophie ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, November 17)

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See detailPlantigrady due to a MRSI localized myopathy in a newborn Belgian blue calf
Genart, Marie; Evrard, Laurence ULg; Garcia de Fonseca, Rita et al

Scientific conference (2014, October 17)

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See detailWound management of a pregnant Belgian blue cow with severe toxic cutaneous necrosis affecting the limbs.
Gaillot, Claire; Claeys, Stéphanie ULg; Douffet, François ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, October 17)

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See detailHepatocholecystitis due to Salmonella Dublin in a crossbred calf
Ronzoni, Anna; Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Evrard, Laurence ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, October 17)

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See detailProceedings of the 1st FARAH-Day Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (University of Liege - Belgium)
Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

Book published by Presses de la Faculté de Médecine vétérinaire de l’Université de Liège (2014)

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See detailNatural intrauterine infection with Schmallenberg virus in malformed newborn calves: pathology and distribution of viral RNA
Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Sarlet, Michaël ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2014), 20(8),

We comprehensively surveyed morphologic alterations in calves naturally infected in utero by Schmallenberg virus (SBV) and born deformed. SBV-specific RNA was distributed unevenly in different tissues ... [more ▼]

We comprehensively surveyed morphologic alterations in calves naturally infected in utero by Schmallenberg virus (SBV) and born deformed. SBV-specific RNA was distributed unevenly in different tissues. Implications for diagnosic procedures are highlighted. [less ▲]

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